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Use Wordpress to build a website to sell music
Old 2nd October 2016
  #1
Lives for gear
 
StillCrazy's Avatar
 

Use Wordpress to build a website to sell music

Has anyone used wordpress to build a website to sell your music?

If anyone has I would like to know your thoughts on it after having done it. I am not a web developer but want to build a site to sell my music thru that doesn't break the bank.

Thanks in advance for any replies.
Old 2nd October 2016
  #2
Lives for gear
I don't have an answer, but might I suggest that the question asked appears to actually encapsulate two questions:

1. Can one reasonably hope to sell their music through their own stand-alone website?

2. Is making such a website do-able for a non-developer in Wordpress?
Old 2nd October 2016
  #3
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StillCrazy's Avatar
 

agree

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicus View Post
I don't have an answer, but might I suggest that the question asked appears to actually encapsulate two questions:

1. Can one reasonably hope to sell their music through their own stand-alone website?

2. Is making such a website do-able for a non-developer in Wordpress?
Thanks for a summary. It is indeed what I am asking.

I have had a distributor for Europe and Asia for 15+ years and finally negotiated a contract that I can set up a web site to sell in the U.S.. Partly to see if the music sells in the U.S. and part ego trip.
Old 4th October 2016
  #4
Lives for gear
Well more than a day later I'm sorry to see you don't have more replies. This is something that often surprises me about GS - threads about promoting your music generally garner little interest. Don't know why. I realize it's "Gear" Slutz, not "Music Business" Slutz - but still. I would have thought there'd be more interest in the topic of commercializing the music we make with all that gear. Or maybe people are keeping their marketing secrets close?
Old 4th October 2016
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Theres many tools out there other than wordpress TBH. I deal with it all the time at work and would gladly point people elsewhere. It's handy for sure, but you can be up and running alot quicker with other options.

If you want to sell your music through your website, make yourself a nice looking website, and have any buy options link to an external source. Here's a really cool way to give your audience many options for buying:

https://distrokid.com/
Old 4th October 2016
  #6
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by KamandaSD View Post
Theres many tools out there other than wordpress TBH. I deal with it all the time at work and would gladly point people elsewhere. It's handy for sure, but you can be up and running alot quicker with other options.
Not to hijack the OP's thread, but the information alluded to sounds like the kind of thing he and many of the rest of us would like to read.
Old 4th October 2016
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicus View Post
Not to hijack the OP's thread, but the information alluded to sounds like the kind of thing he and many of the rest of us would like to read.
You mean in terms of the other tools? I am simply referring to other website 'builders'. Two I have personally used and seen others use are the following:

Wix
Squarespace

Both stick with modern designs, are easy to use and easily allow for mobile viewing without you having to do anything.

To be honest I think 'selling directly through your website' is too much of a hassle. If you use something like distrokid then people have the option to buy on whatever their favourite platform is. Put a link on your page and bam.
Old 4th October 2016
  #8
Lives for gear
Ah, yes. I found an excellent overview of some of the most popular website builders, including Wordpress, here:

Best Website Builders (Free and Paid) | Digital Trends

A question about these: I know that you can self-host Wordpress sites. That is, install Wordpress on your own private hosting account (many web hosts even have auto-installers), buy a template, and install/build it yourself, so you have complete control over your website. But it's not clear to me if that's possible with other popular website builders.
Old 4th October 2016
  #9
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Cgbravo's Avatar
 

Buy a wordpress theme/template tailored for musicians that supports woocommerce or the like for selling your music, or you can utilize bandcamp and integrate it.

try Theme Forest.

Domain
Hosting
Template
Editing/content
Launch

Fiverr also has people willing to at the very least install the theme/template for you and you can edit the rest for around $5-$15
Old 4th October 2016
  #10
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgbravo View Post
Buy a wordpress theme/template tailored for musicians that supports woocommerce or the like for selling your music.....
Excellent option to retain control of your own website and music. But is that task list complete?

Domain - no problem

Hosting - so am I hosting my audio files for people to listen to before buying? At least that way I'm not subject to any other company's terms & conditions, which they reserve the right to change at any time. But then do I need a hosting package with unlimited bandwidth? And, on the other hand, I'm isolated - not part of a larger music discovery system.

Template - no problem

Editing/content - no problem; if I have no graphics abilities, can one reasonably populate a website's visuals with all photos?

Integrate E-Commerce

Set Up Payment Processing - the big one - where to even start

Launch - with a plan to bring traffic!
Old 4th October 2016
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Cgbravo's Avatar
 

Hey @ musicus thanks for elaborating for OP, I was a bit busy just wanted to give some insight.

Paypal? also Bandcamp now allows fans to use cards (new) or paypal for processing payments. A lot of templates now come integrated with e-commerce hence why I mentioned to make sure it has woocommerce, you can also sell merch this way.

As for audio why not use a 3rd party? Soundcloud? Youtube official audio? allows for monetization and streaming as well, a lot of these templates come with an audio player as well, pretty sleek designed and popular wordpress plugins, realistically how much music will you showcase for the time being? an entire catalog? a latest release? that will give you your answer.

A lot of the hosting packages already include unlimited/unmetered bandwidth storage is usually unlimited or enough, but read the fine print apparently its not necessarily unlimited, but if you're not expecting a TON of traffic this is a great way to start.

Photography is important and websites now a days tend to be particularly minimal, which is a great thing IMO, especially as a "beginner", consider partnering with an art director/graphic designer if you want something more elaborate for your websites header and such.

Since I mentioned the above let me stress simplicity a bit more, it goes a long way of course w/o sacrificing quality. Also budget this out on paper, like literally write it down a few times and adjust your plan accordingly OP.

I had no previous WP experience and after working on 2 or 3 sites for myself I have picked up on the basics, prepare for many tabs and youtube tuts! Also please consider your template, designers allow you to preview the demos, test it out on MOBILE, PC, MAC, SAFARI, CHROME, ect. get a feel for it, put yourself in your listeners shoes.

Think of Wordpress as your DAW
Template as your SONG (developers include their own plugins that integrate with the template consider it your stems?)
WP also includes additional 'PLUGINS'
Than its time for the MIX (editing the template to your needs)
Old 5th October 2016
  #12
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgbravo View Post
... A lot of templates now come integrated with e-commerce hence why I mentioned to make sure it has woocommerce, you can also sell merch this way....
OK - researched Woocommerce. Open source, free base product, handles digital products, lots of extensions, tight Wordpress integration - very nice.

Another thing I like is that it only works with self-hosted WP sites - this is software you install and run on your own server, not a hosted solution.

It appears there are two ways to get and install it:
- for some reason, the only way to get it directly from Woocommerce is to create an account with them
- but you can simply download and install it - or even auto-install it! - through WordPress.

As someone who hates having to create new accounts everywhere, I love that the second option is available - cause going this route, so far the only 'account' I've had to create is my hosting account, yet I've got a full website with a shopping cart.

BUT - woocommerce is just the shopping cart, right? If I understand correctly, then I need a subscription to a service to actually process the payments, called a 'payment gateway'?

Looking at Woocommerce's site

https://woocommerce.com/product-cate...ment-gateways/

they have a list of gateway partners. Looks like typical fees are 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction, plus most have a monthly/annual fee. And I'm going to have to create a Woocommerce account to buy the gateway's extension?

Reading a few of those, it appears that for some you then need a merchant bank account, which is not the same as a regular business or personal account. Some you don't.

So we've not reached the bottom of the rabbit hole just yet.

With apologies to the OP, as it appears I have thoroughly hijacked his thread.
Old 5th October 2016
  #13
Lives for gear
 

May I ask why you are so focused on self hosting? And so-called 'control'? I feel like your stuck in about 2008 and spending more time trying to figure stuff out when it could have been all done by now.
Old 5th October 2016
  #14
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Cgbravo's Avatar
 

if you notice, unless you have a very attentive and strong following the only thing worth selling direct to consumer as a musician from YOUR web under YOUR control is merch. Individual songs or singles will benefit more from digital aggregators in todays system.
Old 5th October 2016
  #15
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by KamandaSD View Post
May I ask why you are so focused on self hosting? And so-called 'control'? I feel like your stuck in about 2008 and spending more time trying to figure stuff out when it could have been all done by now.
We could have a long conversation about the pros and cons of the burgeoning internet middleman business model. But in this case, I'm just exploring what it does take to DIY it. Maybe the result will make using a middleman service the logical choice. Don't know 'til we look.

Besides, according to them, about a third of all online stores in the world go this way today - so it can't be too '2008'.

Last edited by musicus; 5th October 2016 at 07:52 PM..
Old 5th October 2016
  #16
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgbravo View Post
Individual songs or singles will benefit more from digital aggregators in todays system.
Now there's another conversation: just how important/beneficial is it really for a new, unknown artist to be present on the many digital music stores. Especially if they don't fit into one of the top few mainstream genres like pop or rap.

For now this is just an exploration of what it takes to diy the project, but, yes, that will need to be balanced against the costs and benefits of other solutions.

So far we're at:

- get hosting
- install WordPress
- select a band template
- populate it with photos, text and music
- install Woocommerce
- build the store
- select a payment gateway, get its woocommerce extension, & sign up
- maybe get a merchant account if the payment gateway needs it

I also saw that if you're going to process credit card numbers on your server, rather than transferring temporarily to the payment gateway's site, then you need to get an SSL certificate as well.

What's next?

Last edited by musicus; 5th October 2016 at 07:48 PM..
Old 6th October 2016
  #17
Lives for gear
 

It's beneficial because people have preferred platforms and may have credits in some of them to use as well. I definitely have preferred platforms to buy music online and my buy rate is definitely higher for those that support them. Hey, I'm all for DIY, but like I said, you could already be done by now. Not to mention it's still DIY...

-Sign up for wix or squarespace, build your website for free. No installs required. Easier than using WP.
-If happy with website, pay and you get your own domain and they host. No work on your end required.
-Sign up for distrokid, upload your stuff ONCE and have it across various platforms. Link these from your site.
-Use something like bigcartel for physical merch

The best part about the above method is there basically 0 maintenance.

Do what you will, just trying to provide an alternate method that I think will be easier for you now, as well as down the road.
Old 8th October 2016
  #18
I think going with Distrokid makes a lot of sense, to be frank. It puts you in major stores (or not at your per-store discretion) and only takes a fairly minimal yearly fee per artist, the artist keeps all the label/artist royalties. It's no frills, though, for sure.

But, anyhow, there is a pretty good Wordpress plugin system called Easy Digital Downloads.

(https://easydigitaldownloads.com/)

It's free and basically plugs in sales features to pages or posts using shortcodes. It has a built-in cart system (you can try it) that updates into a section of the page (and, of course, is accessible from any page where you place the appropriate shortcode.

Here's a proof-of-concept/demo page: Got Canned – If You Want It | TK Major

I have it set to handover to Paypal for secure transaction processing, but there are a number of gateway options.

(There is also an 'ecosystem' of add-ons, free and pay-for add-on modules for various extended business tasks. But the basic system works well for selling music or other downloads. I found the plugin creating an e-book sale thing for a friend. You can use it for music, software, books, basically anything you can serve from a website.)


PS... You may note the demo site above is still using http; because the transactions are passed over to Paypal (or a gateway of choice), it hasn't been an issue. But, of course, I will be complying with the push to have all sites be https by January. I've just been lazy (with little justification, actually, since my hosting provider is making things surprisingly easy and, better yet, free in basic form; I just have a slug of sites to do).

Last edited by theblue1; 8th October 2016 at 03:44 AM..
Old 9th October 2016
  #19
Lives for gear
OK - been doing a lot of reading the last couple of days, and have a new appreciation for hosted website builders like Wix.

Yes, it means entering into yet another contract with yet another service provider (does anyone ever think about all the online contracts they've personally committed to? - rhetorical question, few people do), but this includes hosting, and you'd have to sign up to a web host for the self-hosted solution anyway. So, same number of service contracts to enter into.

No, you don't 'own' your website - if the service shuts down, or changes so it's not good for you anymore, you have nothing to take with you. You have to set up from scratch all over again somewhere else. But I've moved owned websites before, and it was a major hassle. Probably as much work as simply setting up a new template-based builder solution.

Then there's maintenance - an owned site, it's yours, and so is the maintenance. Browsers evolve and older sites stop working on newer browsers, and fixing that is your problem. Whereas the hosted builders keep their templates up to date without you even knowing. This is especially true for mobile - ensuring that your website remains compatible with the rapidly changing and expanding mobile browser market.

Now, it does mean you're limited to the available templates for design. You might be tempted to discount the importance of a really unique site design for a new artist. But when you're trying to get noticed, anything that grabs people attention is helpful. Maybe it's possible to populate and customize the templates in unique, eye-catching ways.

And, a little bonus - in the specific case of Wix, they're a publicly traded company - you can actually own a piece of the company that owns your website.

OK, but the cost?

You can find very good hosting for a few dollars a month these days. Call it $10/mo. That includes, obviously, using your own domain. You might have to buy a WordPress theme, but this is a one time cost and you can find very good ones for $75. So if I spread the cost of the template over two years, that's about $13/mo.

Don't count the cost of the domain 'cause you have to own it in either case.

The hosted builders typically offer a free option, but generally you have to pay to use your own domain. For example the cheapest option with your own domain (and no advertising) at Wix is $16/mo (as of today), but the unlimited bandwidth option is $24/mo. So having that staff of developers keeping your site's coding up to date isn't free. And you have to take care which features you add to the site - some are free, some are paid. But, if you're thinking about this as more than a hobby and plan to do some marketing to make some money, how many businesses operate for just $25/mo? It's pretty reasonable. If you're not making $300/year to cover it, then it really is just a hobby - but many people spend a lot more than $300/yr on their hobbies.

So, $13/mo vs $24/mo for similar public presence. I'm paying the differential - $11/mo for the convenience of really simple set up and a tech team keeping my website up to date and mobile ready. That's $130/yr for that. I have to admit, $130/yr to take that off my shoulders and free up that time for music creation seems not just reasonable but smart for the small, upstart artist.

Next - sales.

Last edited by musicus; 9th October 2016 at 06:35 PM..
Old 10th October 2016
  #20
I tried Wordpress and I found it to be a real pain. The built in themes that come with WP are very sucky. Additionally, you cannot edit your pages with Dreamweaver, at least not with the non-cloud version. I had to download an additional editor to be able to work with WP which I didn't like.

I much prefer working with Dreamweaver to edit HTML code. If you do end up choosing WP, as others have already stated, it's better to purchase a prefab theme that's suitable to your liking.
Old 11th October 2016
  #21
Lives for gear
But wait - if I'm going to use a hosted website builder with a monthly fee, general website services like Wix are great, but there are several such services out there specialized in providing musician websites, with all the bells and whistles optimized for a musician. Why not use one of them? Looking at a few, they generally even have ecommerce for digital downloads built right in.
Old 11th October 2016
  #22
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Squawk's Avatar
If you don't know what you are doing, hire a professional or just use a built in system (Wix etc.) where everything is handled on their end. Wordpress as a platform is very easily hacked and compromised if you don't keep up with updates on a continual basis. This is especially true in a shared hosting environment.

You are far better off with digital distribution (iTunes, etc.), as others have mentioned, which you can then incorporate into your site. Dealing with the e-commerce and customer end yourself requires a certain level of knowledge and upkeep that you probably don't want to be dealing with yourself.

Feel free to PM me if you like with any questions. I do have extensive knowledge in this realm.
Old 11th October 2016
  #23
I really like wordpress. I have my own website hosted on it, and also maintain the website of the studio I work for. It is hugely customisable but it depends how much HTML, CSS and PHP you know.

I don't think you really need to buy anything wordpress related. There are hundreds, if not thousands of wordpress themes freely available from within the wordpress dashboard itself. Likewise plugins for virtually anything including e-commerce. Time is the ultimate challenge. Once you come to terms with what you are doing and how to achieve it you can knock together a wordpress site pretty quickly.
Old 19th October 2016
  #24
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lame pseudonym's Avatar
 

I have tried to work with Wordpress a few times, and I hated it every time. The templates all look like office furniture, because they are. And the options are near-nonexistent. And it's way harder to figure out than just writing the damn markup yourself.

I decided that it would be easier to just learn enough HTML and CSS to make a site, than to screw around with packaged "solutions". And I made a really nice simple site and it was way more fun than fighting some guy's software.

PM me if you want to see my site.
Old 20th October 2016
  #25
Gear Guru
 
Derp's Avatar
As someone that buys a lot of music online, Wordpress sites always look sketchy to me. I second setting up a Wix account. Wix is easy to use and has the ability to add a storefront. Plus you don't need to know any code to make something that looks professional.
Old 21st October 2016
  #26
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by lame pseudonym View Post
...I decided that it would be easier to just learn enough HTML and CSS to make a site, than to screw around with packaged "solutions". And I made a really nice simple site and it was way more fun than fighting some guy's software....
I have a strong appreciation for the DIY and KISS ethos. (ethii?)

But today, its tough. Have you tested your site on multiple browsers and multiple screen resolutions? Worse - at least a third of users are mobile these days - have you developed either a liquid or adaptive framework for them?

I abandoned the notion of a true DIY website for these reasons. Although I must say I have moments of being tempted to just make a bare bones retro html site - but I fear in that case anything less than excellent design would end up looking amateurish instead of intentionally-retro. And, as I said - there's mobile.
Old 21st October 2016
  #27
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicus View Post
I abandoned the notion of a true DIY website for these reasons. ....
On the other hand:

Weebly hacked, 43 million credentials stolen
https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/20/we...ntials-stolen/
Old 21st October 2016
  #28
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Squawk's Avatar
The bottom line is that unless you know what you are doing, you are far better off with a digital distributor that can get you onto iTunes, Bandcamp, etc. You'll have far more reach with new audiences. You're likely not going to make a fortune anyway, so why limit yourself, and deal with the extra work?

Selling on your website via WooCommerce will not allow your sales to be registered (Soundscan, RIAA, etc.), and means that you will need to deal with any and all technical issues, customer complaints, chargebacks, paypal refunds etc. And most importantly, security.

And, if you are taking credit card payments directly, then you need to have an SSL cert, and may require PCI compliance, in which case you will need compliance scans on a regular basis, and know how to bring your site and server into compliance if it fails.
Old 21st October 2016
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth Guru View Post
I tried Wordpress and I found it to be a real pain. The built in themes that come with WP are very sucky. Additionally, you cannot edit your pages with Dreamweaver, at least not with the non-cloud version. I had to download an additional editor to be able to work with WP which I didn't like.

I much prefer working with Dreamweaver to edit HTML code. If you do end up choosing WP, as others have already stated, it's better to purchase a prefab theme that's suitable to your liking.
As someone who started doing web pates in the mid 90s with a text editor and moving to Dreamweaver and then beyond, I can easily understand the discomfort of dealing with modern web development models and CSS.

But as a database developer (starting in mid-80s), I totally understand the need for CMS (content management systems) to work with regularized strictures.

In the old days of static web pages, you'd use a text/code editor to create your own HTML or maybe a WYSIWYG editor like the old MS Frontpage or Dreamweaver to create a one-off page. If you were doing a site, you might develop a sort of template, maybe manually cutting and pasting blocks of code for duplicated page elements. But sites with more than a few pages built in such a fashion could be a TPITA to maintain or implement system-wide changes upon.

That's why the notion of separating content from structure and styling arose -- leading to CSS and server languages that allowed the script-enviro equivalent of modular programming -- all with notion that sophisticated web sites of the future (and that's been now for some time) would likely served up on the fly from content files served from a database and plugged into procedural code files (also served from a database, in all likelihood) that then output browser-ready HTML+JS pages that are then 'styled' by CSS.

There are two primary ways to develop modern sites: through the use of code frameworks and via CMS systems like Wordpress, Drupal, and others.*
* (I think the Joomla CMS is still around and some folk still code their own CMS from the code up as I did on one large e-commerce site that had previously been built of individual static pages crafted in Dreamweaver in the late 90s. Things went OK enough for them -- until they needed to change the prices of the items -- which were all hard-coded in. I created a sales/catalog CMS coded the ground up for them and extended it with various submodules like message boards, galleries, and such.

If I was starting today, of course, I would have used a third party framework for my presentation system. But using a CMS instead, one with a rich ecosystem of plugins or custom site types [themes if you will] would make adding features like calendars, message boards, contact forms, etc, literally trivial in many cases.

But, touch wood, it's been generally very workable and makes it relatively easy to add new content and manage the catalogs. But I would NOT want to be the poor dev who might inherit this codebase. (Yes, it's documented but... er, that could be substantially better. I was young and impulsive in those days. If I were to take such an assignment today, I might seriously consider designing the system to run out of WordPress. You wouldn't do that for a meganational, million-transaction-a-day commerce site, of course, but keeping smaller systems in a widely-used and understood system like Wordpress does have some advantages when it comes time to hand over the developer reins.)

With regards to themes -- that's an interesting, slightly wild-west scene.

Wordpress is very open source and market-oriented. Plugins and themes often compete at the free level, trying to establish a user base and bona fides to sell 'professional themes' as well a turnkey sites (basically they use themes they develop and/or customize to create a site that can instantly be used by basic-WP-aware administrative and editorial staff (which, of course, might just be one person ).

And that can work out. It's great to have a range of different themes you can plug your content into -- or try. Because themes are essentially procedural/branching PHP code files combined with CSS styling files, modifying/customizing them to provide or add different capabilities can be a hassle. Even modifying the look can be a hassle because the procedural files generate the basic HTML file -- and you may need to modify both.

And THAT is why 'starter themes' evolved. The most useful of them from a dev point of view are those that simply output all the content for a page -- from a clearly written and well-commented PHP file that is, itself, relatively easy to mod or extend -- along with super basic CSS files that provide for customization of the display of the various elements.

Plugins in WP are, in effect, (often but not always smaller) code blocks that are used to add various changes or additions from small to quite large in a given WP site. They are separate from but can be interdependent on the features and procedures implicit in various themes. Some themes come with add-in plugins. (This is a popular way of adding commercial features to freely available themes. Say you as a WP developer offer a super basic onlines sales system theme available for free via the free WP themes repository. You might create a pay-for version of the same theme [like the step up from free to paid phone app] OR you might design a free core system and then add pay-for features via commercial plugins. That way you only have to maintain a single core codebase.)


Anyhow, I suspect I've drifted far away from the original topic, the paradigm shift implicit in comparing development in Dreamweaver vis a vis using a CMS.

On about your business, web denizens.
Old 21st October 2016
  #30
Using WordPress is great for selling merchandise, we're using WooCommerce and Stripe over on the Voidance Records Shop, Stripe is a free payment processor. Works well, only takes a few hours to get the whole thing up and running.

We were selling music through it as a digital product (option in WooCommerce), but we've recently decided that from here on out, we're giving away our records, open-sourcing the project files, and funding the whole thing through merch, as the merch has proven surprisingly lucrative versus streaming and selling records.

We're using The Printful for merchandise fulfillment via WordPress too, so we don't actually have to print our merchandise, hold stock, or even dispatch it, it's all automated. Selling music is fairly dead unless you're on a major label with significant TV and radio exposure, especially when compared to selling a product like clothing; everybody has to cover themselves, not everybody has to buy records. Go figure.

We're also distributing our records via RouteNote to the traditional stores and streaming platforms in case anybody wants it on Spotify, Apple Music et cetera. This means we can monetize through use of our tracks on YouTube etc and collect royalties.
RouteNote is free (they take a 15% cut unless you want to pay a small fee), and the experience has been far better than it was with Ditto Music-- which in our experience for two releases, was quite frankly bollocks with missing statistics to this day for the major stores, and dozens of support tickets over typos in metadata that weren't there in the information we submitted.

I offer a web design and development service, happy to help anybody set up their WordPress CMS for a reasonable figure if that's what you're after. We offer custom themes, and the configuration of off-the-shelf products.
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