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Behringer now talking about ARP Odyssey Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 30th December 2014
  #481
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grasspike's Avatar
Old 30th December 2014
  #482
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soundxplorer's Avatar
Dear Behringer -

We are getting an Odyssey clone already. Please make a Prophet 5 or Jupiter 8 instead. Or a Synthi AKS.

Thanks.
Old 30th December 2014
  #483
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acealive's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by grasspike View Post
the M Audio Venom is #1 hmmmmmmmm
no surprise.
It's below 200 bucks, has an USB-Audio Interface and a 49 keys keyboard.
Even if you don't use the (imo very mediocre) internal sounds, it's a great choice for a beginner's setup.
Old 30th December 2014
  #484
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by grasspike View Post
prove it post the sales numbers

for example take a look at the top selling synths on Sweetwater the largest online music and proaudio retailer in the USA

Keyboards / Synthesizers | Sweetwater.com

notice the amount of VA synths, then notice that years after it's release how the Roland GAIA which you claim was not successful commercially still sits on the list where it has for years

Sweetwater sells more GAIA's than the Moog Sub Phatty, Tom Oberheim Two Voice Pro, Prophet 12, Arturia Microbrute, Bass Station II, and Elektron Analog Keys

So by your logic if the GAIA was a failure and virtual analog synths are not popular how much more of a failure are Analog synths made by Moog, DSI, Aturia, Novation, and Electron?

Take special note of the Novation Mininova which sits at #3 and the Bass Station II which sits at #18 why is the VA synth from the same company selling so much better than the analog one if as you say VA synths are not popular these days?

Ok, I am talking about the new trend in sales, and from what I have observed the last months searching in several sites like Sweetwater, Amazon etc, if you want take a look on Amazon, Amazon.com: Arturia MicroBrute Analog Synthesizer: Musical Instruments. The Arturia Microbrute has already 33 reviews from happy customers, and the Roland Gaia only 9 …
Amazon.com: Roland GAIA SH-01 Synthesizer: Musical Instruments

The number of reviews on Amazon is the safest indicator about synthesizer’s popularity….
Sweetwater is a great company, maybe the biggest music store on the internet, but you can't base your opinion exclusively from their list….
Old 30th December 2014
  #485
Lives for gear
 

Also, interesting to see rytm and octatrak being the most expensive machines in the thomann list. Elektron must be making some nice business, and the octa is not a new machine.
Old 30th December 2014
  #486
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acealive View Post
no surprise.
It's below 200 bucks, has an USB-Audio Interface and a 49 keys keyboard.
Even if you don't use the (imo very mediocre) internal sounds, it's a great choice for a beginner's setup.
I agree, even the cheap midi keyboards are in the same price range….
Old 30th December 2014
  #487
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acealive View Post
also interesting, The Top Selling Synthesizers at Thomann, Europe's largest online shop for music equipment :

Thomann Top Sellers: Synthesizers - Thomann UK
Thanks for the link, very interesting list…..

So, the most popular synths are:

1. M- Audio Venom

2. Korg Volca Beats

3. Korg Volca Bass

4. Arturia Microbrute

5. Korg Volca Keys

6. Korg Monotron

7. Waldorf Streichfett

8. Roland TR - 8

9. Kurzweil PC3 LE

10. Electron Analog Rytm



Amazing!!!

(source, Thomann.de)
Old 30th December 2014
  #488
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steveswisher's Avatar
 

My only experience with Behringer gear is a XENYX 1622FX mixer that I've had for 7-8 years. It's been a great little mixer. Never had any issues thankfully.
Old 30th December 2014
  #489
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grasspike's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by George321 View Post
Ok, I am talking about the new trend in sales, and from what I have observed the last months searching in several sites like Sweetwater, Amazon etc, if you want take a look on Amazon, Amazon.com: Arturia MicroBrute Analog Synthesizer: Musical Instruments. The Arturia Microbrute has already 33 reviews from happy customers, and the Roland Gaia only 9 …
Amazon.com: Roland GAIA SH-01 Synthesizer: Musical Instruments

The number of reviews on Amazon is the safest indicator about synthesizer’s popularity….
Sweetwater is a great company, maybe the biggest music store on the internet, but you can't base your opinion exclusively from their list….
there you go again stating your opinion as fact, please explain why Amazon which is not a music store is the "safest indicator" of a synthesizer's popularity. I buy TONS of stuff from Amazon, yet I can't recall ever buying any piece of gear from them, my guess is I am not alone in that

For the record the GAIA has always been in the top 10 or so on Sweetwater every since it came out, a point I have made on this forum many times, when people want to falsely claim it doesn't sell well when in fact it does

and if you are as you claim

Quote:
Originally Posted by George321 View Post
talking about the new trend in sales, and from what I have observed the last months searching in several sites like Sweetwater, Amazon etc,,….
how much newer can you get with sales trends than with a current listing of popularity based on current trends on sales

Quote:
Originally Posted by George321 View Post
Thanks for the link, very interesting list…..

So, the most popular synths are:

1. M- Audio Venom
you mean you didn't do any research when you stated as fact

Quote:
Originally Posted by George321 View Post
VA synths aren't popular these days. Synths like M Audio Venom, Akai Miniak, Casio P1 and Roland Gaia were all unsuccessful commercially. I think, the new best seller is the Arturia microbrute! and also all synths by electron are very popular.
looks like in Europe home of Arturia the unsuccessful M Audio Venom is actually #1
Old 30th December 2014
  #490
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by grasspike View Post
there you go again stating your opinion as fact, please explain why Amazon which is not a music store is the "safest indicator" of a synthesizer's popularity. I buy TONS of stuff from Amazon, yet I can't recall ever buying any piece of gear from them, my guess is I am not alone in that

For the record the GAIA has always been in the top 10 or so on Sweetwater every since it came out, a point I have made on this forum many times, when people want to falsely claim it doesn't sell well when in fact it does

and if you are as you claim



how much newer can you get with sales trends than with a current listing of popularity based on current trends on sales



you mean you didn't do any research when you stated as fact



looks like in Europe home of Arturia the unsuccessful M Audio Venom is actually #1
It cant be that unsuccessful if its Thomann's top selling "synthesizer".
I've personaly bought a few items via amazon. I would personaly think(though im no expert) that due to amazons sell everything nature, that it wouldnt be a bad place to cast a judgement on an items overall economic impact in terms of a market. You get a broad comparison of how well it sells compared to everything else. In specific, i bought both of my volcas (bass and beats) from there. Just throwing in my two cents ;>
Old 30th December 2014
  #491
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Looping Loddar's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by grasspike View Post
looks like in Europe home of Arturia the unsuccessful M Audio Venom is actually #1
This seem to annoy you. I like the sound of the filter of the Venom very much. Maybe the Venom is not so bad not so bad as you think it is?

Afaik there is a special deal between M-Audio and Thomann - as a result they can sell the Venom for 200,- € as a "blowout". Maybe you know a lot of good or better poly synth alternatives (for a price of 200,- €, new), but the customers of Thomann buy the Venom in large quantities. This is a fact. Price is something that matters.

I am sure that Uli Behringer knows this and wants to sell his synthesizers (which maybe come in 2016 or later) in large quantities. This and Ulis systematic approach to build up "synth building competence" are good news for musicians.
Old 30th December 2014
  #492
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3rdpath's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looping Loddar View Post
This seem to annoy you. I like the sound of the filter of the Venom very much. Maybe the Venom is not so bad
we're getting off-topic ( and i'm not helping...) but the venom is a very underrated synth and an incredible bang for the buck. i have a boatload of hardware synths and the venom has a character that is unlike any of the others. it's filter can be a bit too nasty for my tastes but dial it back and it has some serious sweet spots.
Old 30th December 2014
  #493
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acealive's Avatar
what is really mindblowing about that list is to see how often the Microkorg is still bought, after being 11 years on the market.
I wonder how many units Korg has sold over the years.
Old 30th December 2014
  #494
I don't know what some of you ppl prefer when it comes down to synths & sounds, but VENOM is a killer synth. Period.

I couldn't afford it when it was released (it was +600 Euros IIRC), but I've finally managed to score one in mint condition for a little more than 100 Euros this year (was ready to order from Thomann otherwise). IMO, NOTHING comes close to it - its sound & character are quite unique.
Old 30th December 2014
  #495
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acealive View Post
what is really mindblowing about that list is to see how often the Microkorg is still bought, after being 11 years on the market.
I wonder how many units Korg has sold over the years.
Korg has sold more than 100.000 Microkorg synthesizers throughout the last decade! The Korg MicroKorg: The Most Popular Synthesizer Of All Time?
Old 30th December 2014
  #496
reviews on Amazon =/= Sales


Im a prime member, I buy tonnes of stuff on amazon, gear, household, automotive, I think Ive reviewed four items
Old 30th December 2014
  #497
DGL
Gear Maniac
One thing i'd like to add are technics, generalmusic and elka. They were all companies that you would have thought would never release a credible, high cost, professional product but they all did, Technics with the SX-WSA1, generalmusic with the PRO3, RealPiano, S2/3 and genesis and elka of course with the synthex (and I suppose you could count their master keyboards as they had polyAT and the work they started on the S2/3).
So a company with the resources such as Music Group (who have made their own custom silicon inc. VCA's/filters, ADAT transceivers and just recently the midas M8000 an 8 channel 192kHz A/D convertor) should also be able to do it.
Old 30th December 2014
  #498
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acealive's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcearl View Post
reviews on Amazon =/= Sales


Im a prime member, I buy tonnes of stuff on amazon, gear, household, automotive, I think Ive reviewed four items
Amazon's Review System is not very good.
It allows you to review items that you have not purchased at amazon, therefore leaving lots of room for manipulation by fake reviews and such.

Thomann on the other hand only allows for reviews of items that were purchased at Thomann with the same account.
That's a better system imo.
Old 30th December 2014
  #499
Gear Addict
 
Uli Behringer's Avatar
 

Dear all,

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Uli Behringer, CEO of the MUSIC Group, umbrella company of the brands Midas, Klark Teknik, Turbosound, Behringer and Bugera.

Our Customer Engagement Manager John DiNiccola which you have seen here a few times asked me to participate. I have been reading this thread with great interest.

We are just celebrating our 25th company anniversary and this is a wonderful opportunity to pursue something I always wanted to do - to build synthesizers.

When I was 16, I built my first analog synthesizer, the UB1, which unfortunately later got lost during a company relocation.
An image of the UB1 can be found here. UB1 Synthesizer

As a classically trained pianist and jazz musician, electronic instruments and synthesizers in particular have always been close to my heart. During my student days I played in bands and later in jazz clubs to make a living. Oscar Peterson has been and still is my absolute piano hero.

I am very excited to see how these classic synthesizers and sounds from the 70's and 80's have regained so much popularity.
During my younger days (and that's long ago), I was the proud owner of a stack of instruments that ranged from Fender Rhodes, to Mini Moog, Siel Orchestra, Hohner Clavinet and of course my UB1 Synthesizer.
In those days, if you owned some of these instruments, you had arrived as a keyboarder. However some of you might also remember that this stuff was so heavy, that unless you had roadies (and I didn't), carrying this equipment to a gig almost broke your fingers. (These were the few moments when you wished you had become a guitar player).

While much has changed in the past 40 years in terms of technology and manufacturing techniques, the desirability of analog sounds has not.
Analog sounds are different and there are physical reasons why these sounds cannot be fully recreated by digital means.

Our focus will be on monophonic as well as polyphonic analog synths, however combined with the power of today's digital control and some great add-on FX.

While we are currently looking into the revival of some classic synthesizers, we are also working on complete new designs. However in order to manage expectations, we are still some time away from releasing a finished product.

Leading this effort will be our world-class Midas R&D team in the UK, where we have incredible talents both on the analog as well as digital side. Best of all, these great people love synthesizers and that is equally important to design great instruments.

I am more than happy to answer questions you might have but kindly ask you to be patient as this is a very busy time around Namm.

Thank you for welcoming me here.

Uli
Old 30th December 2014
  #500
Quote:
Originally Posted by acealive View Post
Amazon's Review System is not very good.
It allows you to review items that you have not purchased at amazon, therefore leaving lots of room for manipulation by fake reviews and such.

Thomann on the other hand only allows for reviews of items that were purchased at Thomann with the same account.
That's a better system imo.
I doubt it has much to do with music gear but many of the reviewers on Amazon have received the items free from Amazon for review. I think its says "vine member" next to the reviewers name...

I use the reviews on Amazon when I purchase items, but, again, theyre no reflection of sales
Old 30th December 2014
  #501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uli Behringer View Post
Our focus will be on monophonic as well as polyphonic analog synths

cool
Old 30th December 2014
  #502
Gear Addict
 

Old 30th December 2014
  #503
Old 30th December 2014
  #504
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Looping Loddar's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uli Behringer View Post
(...)I am more than happy to answer questions you might have but kindly ask you to be patient as this is a very busy time around Namm.(...)
Hello!

I am very happy to take the opportunity to ask you:

1. Is there a realistic chance that the "Behringer Odyssey" comes with an AHDR or ADSR instead of the lame original AR?

2. ...and maybe a speed select for the LFO?
Old 30th December 2014
  #505
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rasseru's Avatar
1: How is the Behringer Oddysey going to differ from a straight clone?


2: Why the oddysey if korg are doing it? (im guessing you didnt know?) and does it change things because they are making one?


and thanks for offering to answer some questions, im glad you mentioned poly synths. make a jp8 please
Old 30th December 2014
  #506
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uli Behringer View Post
Leading this effort will be our world-class Midas R&D team in the UK, where we have incredible talents both on the analog as well as digital side.
Wow.

OK then: Korg got one of the ARP people on board, and for their Monotron and Volca stuff they got a young forward thinking designer if I recall correctly. Arturia hired Yves Usson for the Minibrute/Microbrute. Roland previewed their recreations at a whole slew of techno legends.

When you mention Midas, I think mixers, not synths. Sure, a well designed EQ most likely gives one a good basis for filter design, and of course there's all the other work you've done already - all ingredients should be there - but you are counting on the "native" strength of the Midas team?

I think most people like the idea of the lone inventor and while building your own synth is pretty much that, the synth designers became famous for synths in the first place (and then they branched out to other equipment), not so much the other way 'round.

I guess what I'm saying is that I personally really like the video series other manufacturers have made that sort of showcases the design/brainstorming process, and I think that'd warm up a lot of people to your future synths as well by showing the enthusiasm of a small, tightly knit team given the opportunity by a bigger company to do their own thing.

Of course, if a real product is still a while away it'd be way early to start building up hype, but still. You are after all known for the ability to scale manufacturing - and even though synths are mass produced, people like to think that analogs are sort of a bespoke/artisanal thing. Even the Stradivarius of monosynths had a run of 10,000+ units.
Old 30th December 2014
  #507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uli Behringer View Post
I am more than happy to answer questions you might have but kindly ask you to be patient as this is a very busy time around Namm.
Uli,
Thanks for taking the time to reach out across several different communities.

In 2013, you had said "pianos and synthesizers are not on our priority list.", and I'm glad that you've shifted gears so dramatically on that front.

Along those lines, I saw you mention on Facebook that keys on synths these days are seen as a method of triggering a sound, rather than a tool for performance. Given that the Odyssey is very specifically a performance synthesizer, might you have a similar change of heart, and consider including velocity (and aftertouch) as routable modulation sources? I have a Tempest drum machine that has a "Fixed Level" button that disables velocity when I'd prefer to trigger sounds rather than perform on the instrument.

I'm very pleased to see that the Odyssey you're making has patch memory. When you look at the Pro 2 and the Sub 37 (which, admittedly, are in a different class than an Odyssey), the lengths they take the monosynth beyond what was available in the 70s make a world of difference to me, both as a sound designer and a performer.

Trivially: Of the three Odyssey color schemes, do you have any preference?

Finally: Kudos for putting money back into R&D. I'm looking forward to what the next decade brings. Good luck!
Old 30th December 2014
  #508
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uli Behringer View Post
Dear all,

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Uli Behringer, CEO of the MUSIC Group, umbrella company of the brands Midas, Klark Teknik, Turbosound, Behringer and Bugera.

Our Customer Engagement Manager John DiNiccola which you have seen here a few times asked me to participate. I have been reading this thread with great interest.

We are just celebrating our 25th company anniversary and this is a wonderful opportunity to pursue something I always wanted to do - to build synthesizers.

When I was 16, I built my first analog synthesizer, the UB1, which unfortunately later got lost during a company relocation.
An image of the UB1 can be found here. UB1 Synthesizer

As a classically trained pianist and jazz musician, electronic instruments and synthesizers in particular have always been close to my heart. During my student days I played in bands and later in jazz clubs to make a living. Oscar Peterson has been and still is my absolute piano hero.

I am very excited to see how these classic synthesizers and sounds from the 70's and 80's have regained so much popularity.
During my younger days (and that's long ago), I was the proud owner of a stack of instruments that ranged from Fender Rhodes, to Mini Moog, Siel Orchestra, Hohner Clavinet and of course my UB1 Synthesizer.
In those days, if you owned some of these instruments, you had arrived as a keyboarder. However some of you might also remember that this stuff was so heavy, that unless you had roadies (and I didn't), carrying this equipment to a gig almost broke your fingers. (These were the few moments when you wished you had become a guitar player).

While much has changed in the past 40 years in terms of technology and manufacturing techniques, the desirability of analog sounds has not.
Analog sounds are different and there are physical reasons why these sounds cannot be fully recreated by digital means.

Our focus will be on monophonic as well as polyphonic analog synths, however combined with the power of today's digital control and some great add-on FX.

While we are currently looking into the revival of some classic synthesizers, we are also working on complete new designs. However in order to manage expectations, we are still some time away from releasing a finished product.

Leading this effort will be our world-class Midas R&D team in the UK, where we have incredible talents both on the analog as well as digital side. Best of all, these great people love synthesizers and that is equally important to design great instruments.

I am more than happy to answer questions you might have but kindly ask you to be patient as this is a very busy time around Namm.

Thank you for welcoming me here.

Uli
HI Mr Uli Behringer
You are always welcome here

The new big thing at the moment in the industry is the revival of the analog synths, but I think that the companies are obligated to embody all the new and modern features in these old fashion synths. Otherwise it not makes any sense.

Arpeggiator, advanced step sequencer, proper 8 or 16 track sequencer, patch memory (at least 64 or 128 user patches), full MIDI implementation, traditional Midi IN/OUT, USB out, and at least 4 or 6 notes polyphony must be standard features for every modern analog synth!

And, the storage capabilities are equally very important, isn't that a big thing the addition of a usb port for storing arrangements immediately as wav or midi files.
Old 30th December 2014
  #509
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Looping Loddar's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by George321 View Post
(...) proper 8 or 16 track sequencer (...) must be standard features for every modern analog synth!
Very ambitious, indeed. ;-)
Old 30th December 2014
  #510
Gear addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Looping Loddar View Post
Very ambitious, indeed. ;-)

Yeah, I know, heh but imagine how convenient it would be….
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