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Pink Floyd "Wish you were here" synth?
Old 27th August 2018
  #61
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Here's a somewhat silly question, but I've wondered for awhile now, How did Pink Floyd create the downward synth scale pattern at the very begin of Shine On? I don't think Richard Wright played the scale. It sounds like something done with a modular synth It sort of reminds me of the odd sounds you can hear out in the middle of nowhere on an AM radio. Thanks, sign me I am Curious Pink
Old 27th August 2018
  #62
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This is a somewhat silly question, but how did Pink Floyd — Richard Wright most likely — create that downward synth scale pattern at the beginning of Crazy Diamond? It wasn't played by a human. Could have been a Mini Moog, but has a modular feel to it. Sign me, I Am Curious Pink.
Old 27th August 2018
  #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReallyOldFart View Post
This is a somewhat silly question, but how did Pink Floyd — Richard Wright most likely — create that downward synth scale pattern at the beginning of Crazy Diamond? It wasn't played by a human. Could have been a Mini Moog, but has a modular feel to it. Sign me, I Am Curious Pink.
Sounds to me like a simple pitch bend or portamento on a patch that has a square wave LFO modulating the amplitude. It doesn't sound like an arpeggio or scale being played to my ears.
Old 27th August 2018
  #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReallyOldFart View Post
This is a somewhat silly question, but how did Pink Floyd — Richard Wright most likely — create that downward synth scale pattern at the beginning of Crazy Diamond? It wasn't played by a human. Could have been a Mini Moog, but has a modular feel to it. Sign me, I Am Curious Pink.
Well i created something like this:
https://www.gearslutz.com/board/atta...wdiamond11.m4a

And yes i remember it being just a portamento patch with LFO going to filter frequency.
The LFO was saw down though, not square.
Old 27th August 2018
  #65


@40:40 ”...VCS3 on Welcome to the Machine..”

Watch for a couple of minutes, Roger talks about loving the VCS3, using it all the time, and still owning one.

Watch the whole video, its great!
Old 15th August 2019
  #66
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Great info !
Thanks.
I'll dig up that old project and tweak some more.

1 more example of the squawk, but without the pitchbend (if that is possible) would be very useful for recreating the timbre.
Just a note held for about 1 second.
TIA

Interesting thing on the vibe sound - in the mix i could hear only the short high pitched part of it - maybe the lower longer part got buried in the bass and drone.
Old 15th August 2019
  #67
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the donal's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero View Post
( posting here, from a discussion in the "Boog" thread, that is veering off topic! )

Behringer Model D

--> I am pretty sure the weird squawk and bird sounds at the beginning are a Yamaha YC-45D

then the random chime/tinkle sounds that are sporadically around the first part, before the "Syd's Riff", I believe are the YC45 too, using the Vibraphone patch

I used to think they were percussion chimes, until I got the YC & experimented

since I am nearly positive they used it at the start, I think there is good probability they used it for those chimes, too

here a are a couple samples I just whipped up:

yc45_noises
yc45_vibe

the vibe mp3 starts dry, then with reverb, then delay ( no reverb )
That twittering sound is very close. I got similar on my SE-02. Haven't tried it with the Behri Model D yet. Was most likely Minimoog.

There's something else going on with the other sound- more than just a pitch bend. It could be with filter mod I suppose, but it sounds like something else is modulating the oscillator.

I reckon that one is more likely with VCS3, but not a scooby on how to reproduce it.

I'll make a recreation myself later
Old 15th August 2019
  #68
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Rob Ocelot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReallyOldFart View Post
This is a somewhat silly question, but how did Pink Floyd — Richard Wright most likely — create that downward synth scale pattern at the beginning of Crazy Diamond? It wasn't played by a human. Could have been a Mini Moog, but has a modular feel to it. Sign me, I Am Curious Pink.
For some reason I always thought this might be a downward pitching Shepard Tone (an acoustic equivalent to an optical illusion) with some amplitude modulation to better disguise it. Pink Floyd have used Shepard Tones before, most blatantly an upwards pitching one at the end of "Echoes".

Last edited by Rob Ocelot; 15th August 2019 at 05:54 PM..
Old 15th August 2019
  #69
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adhmzaiusz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
Pink Floyd have used Shepard Tones before, most blatantly an upwards pitching one at the end of "Echoes".
Actually, that effect at the end of echoes is pretty much a tape echo run into another tape echo... the first echo’s repeat time tweaked to give it that constant rise effect... I discovered this once when messing around
Old 15th August 2019
  #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adhmzaiusz View Post
Actually, that effect at the end of echoes is pretty much a tape echo run into another tape echo... the first echo’s repeat time tweaked to give it that constant rise effect... I discovered this once when messing around
Interesting! I thought that was Gilmour, slide guitar and echo. Nice to keep learning about these recordings.
Old 15th August 2019
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the donal View Post
Interesting! I thought that was Gilmour, slide guitar and echo. Nice to keep learning about these recordings.
You’re probably right, it probably was Gilmour and a slide guitar, but into 2 tape echoes which pretty much make that exact drone effect.
Old 16th August 2019
  #72
Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here: Probably my favorite album of all time. My soundman and I were on the Warner Bros. lot a few weeks ago where the original album cover photo was taken, where we attempted to recreate that iconic image (that's me on the right). Apologies for the small GIF and poorly crafted SFX (for some reason the GIF doesn't animate here):

Old 2 weeks ago
  #73
Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero View Post
it is the ribbon controller on a Yamaha YC-45D. you just slide your finger down, using the "birds" setting

they added some echo though
Just to ask - where is the evidence that he used the YC-45D on this track? The recordings you made do sound good, but I'm not aware that he ever owned/used Yamaha combo organs. These seem like generic enough sounds that he could have made them on many synths too. Just checking since your posts come across as definitive.
Old 1 week ago
  #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReallyOldFart View Post
Here's a somewhat silly question, but I've wondered for awhile now, How did Pink Floyd create the downward synth scale pattern at the very begin of Shine On? I don't think Richard Wright played the scale. It sounds like something done with a modular synth It sort of reminds me of the odd sounds you can hear out in the middle of nowhere on an AM radio. Thanks, sign me I am Curious Pink
Waters was the evil genius in the band with all things effects oriented involving synths. That’s likely his EMS Synthi and it’s unique keyboard you are hearing
Old 1 week ago
  #75
Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero View Post
both of those sounds in the intro are stock sounds on the YC45.

plus the bell like tones playing a random melody, although it is possible that was another organ, since they are not as unique

probability is very high it's a YC45, vs Rick/Roger/Dave/whoever spending a bunch of time to generate a sound that is exactly like what a YC45 ribbon controller sounds like. chances are high that any number of studios had them around, since they were released 1973 or so

go find one & play around with it
I don't want to poo-poo on anyone's party, and I think it would be fantastic to identify how they made those sounds. I just think it needs more research and evidence before saying so definitively that it was a YC-45D. If you're going to make a claim like that, the onus is on you to provide the proof (besides it just sounding close).

I would tend to agree with others that it's probably a VCS3/Synthi doing a modulated glide, given how many other oddball sound effects they used it for on the album. Of course that is just speculation too ..
Old 1 week ago
  #76
You can read about the instruments Pink Floyd used in wikipedia. Here's the listing for part one of SOYCD (each section is described in similar detail).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shine_..._Crazy_Diamond
Part I (Wright, Gilmour, Waters; from 0:00 to 3:54) There are no lyrics in Part I. The instrumental begins with a fade-in of a G minor chord created with an EMS VCS 3, ARP Solina, a Hammond organ, and a wine glass harp (recycled from an earlier project known as Household Objects). This is followed by Wright's Minimoog passages leading into a lengthy, bluesy guitar solo played by Gilmour on a Fender Stratocaster (neck pickup) using a heavily compressed sound and reverb. Part I ends with the synthesizer chord fading into the background. During the fade-out some very faint conversation in the studio can be heard on the left channel.
Old 1 week ago
  #77
Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but what was used to create the sustained chord in the intro to Shine on You Crazy Diamond, part I? The Solina?
Old 1 week ago
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero View Post
fair enough; I submitted it as a possibility by posting it here, but I personally believe 100% that's what they used.
I tend to trust my ears and not wikipedia or even memory of the musicians themselves on matters like that.
And what my ears are telling me is: "becks bolero is right".
Old 1 week ago
  #79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutantt View Post
I tend to trust my ears and not wikipedia or even memory of the musicians themselves on matters like that.
And what my ears are telling me is: "becks bolero is right".
I agree it sounds close, but in the grand scheme of things they are pretty generic sounds. If someone could show that only the YC-45D is capable of making those sounds, or show a photo of a YC-45D anywhere at Abbey Road, or something similar it would go a long way. Until then it seems premature to declare 'this is how it was done'.

Again, hopefully this doesn't come across as poo-poo'ing on the party. I personally love the game of figuring out what gear made what sounds (as long as there is some trail of evidence involved).

Someone mentioned that the quad mix isolates all the synth sounds to a single channel. Does anyone have a link to listen to that? It seems like a good start to find the best quality isolated clips of these sounds. I sure wish there was a way to contact someone in the know who has a good memory ..
Old 1 week ago
  #80
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I don’t have a VCS3 (in the process of building one) but I do have the iVCS3 app on an iPad. This is a pretty good emulation of the VCS3 and amongst the banks of presets for it are a number of Pink Floyd classic sounds. One of these is called ‘Shine On Droplets’ - identical to the sound being discussed.

Anyone have the app to corroborate?
Old 1 week ago
  #81
The documentary "The Story of Wish You Were Here" just says "...synthesizers and organ"


Edit: I didn't realize someone already posted the video.
Old 1 week ago
  #82
Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero View Post
anyone up to the task?

I need someone who feels strongly enough that it wasn't a YC45D, to accept my challenge. Someone courageous enough to be able to publicly admit they were wrong, and follow through with the case of beer.

No anonymous, cowardly disappearing wimps allowed
What exactly is your challenge? Not sure if you intended this to sound so hostile. But again, if you're declaring it's a YC-45D then the burden of proof is on you (not the rest of the world).

Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero
don't you find it odd that Pink Floyd programmed the VCS3 to sound exactly like what running your finger down the strip of a YC45 sounds like, with no prior reference material? not once, but twice?
I find it odd that they used ring modulated white noise to sound like a hi-hat in 'On the Run' instead of using their drummer. Or how they used the VCS3 to make all those sounds on 'Welcome to the Machine'. We are talking about a band that excelled at using synthesizers to make weird sounds and special effects.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cnicht
I don’t have a VCS3 (in the process of building one) but I do have the iVCS3 app on an iPad. This is a pretty good emulation of the VCS3 and amongst the banks of presets for it are a number of Pink Floyd classic sounds. One of these is called ‘Shine On Droplets’ - identical to the sound being discussed.

Anyone have the app to corroborate?
Good thinking, I forgot that app existed. There is a good demo of Pink Floyd sounds with it on YouTube, and their version of this patch (at 6:50) is explained in the comments.



I wonder if that weird bird squawking sound could be replicated on there too. My guess is the chimes are just real chimes. An isolated track to hear all three sounds better would be nice.

PS - I was listening to 'Nobody Home' today and he has a similar modulated glide bit right after saying 'But I've got nowhere to fly to' .. neat coincidence
Old 1 week ago
  #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studio460 View Post
Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but what was used to create the sustained chord in the intro to Shine on You Crazy Diamond, part I? The Solina?
if you skip through the thread, this is covered. multiple layers of stuff
Old 1 week ago
  #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcabbage View Post
Synthi



Synthi on the left VCS3 on the right

yes, they had both models
Old 1 week ago
  #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by becks bolero View Post
yes, they had both models
Were we not talking about the portomento synth part in the song? See post #74
Old 1 week ago
  #86
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LOL ! BB why did you delete all your posts ?
All that remains is what we quoted of you.
It was very useful info people coming here from Google could learn from.
Old 1 week ago
  #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WrecklessEyeball View Post
The documentary "The Story of Wish You Were Here" just says "...synthesizers and organ"
It is because really successful musicians are very rarely gearslutz.
They simply walk into some recording studio, see a "theater organ" in the corner, sit at it and play some cool sounds, then ask the tech to record these sounds for their next song.

There is no need to remember the name of the organ, because they can just remember the name of the studio and come back there if/when they need these sounds again.

Then 40 years later in an interview for a documentary a music technology journalist asks them about the gear they used for that famous song...

"Dude, the only thing i am sure of is that we used some wine glasses.".
Old 1 week ago
  #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcabbage View Post
Were we not talking about the portomento synth part in the song?
you posted a pic of the Synthi & VCS3 with no real explanation

Synthi & VCS3 are the same, one just has a removeable keyboard. they are both capable of the same sounds. how do you know they used a keyboard?

I was contending that they did not use either of them

but that sound is quite obviously a VCS3, or a Synthi !!

here is a pic of them in 1972 messing with both models
Attached Thumbnails
Pink Floyd "Wish you were here" synth?-pink-floyd-1972.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #89
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The did use an EMS DK1 or DK2 monophonic keyboard with the VCS3 and Synthi A as well as the 30-note touch keyboard/digital sequencer that came with the Synthi AKS, the latter being used on "On the run" for example.
Old 1 week ago
  #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studio460 View Post
Sorry if this has already been mentioned, but what was used to create the sustained chord in the intro to Shine on You Crazy Diamond, part I? The Solina?
Afaik the pad is a layer of quadruple-tracked Synthi (4 separate parts), Solina string ensemble and Hammond organ.
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