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Is the RE-201 worth owning today?
Old 8th June 2017 | Show parent
  #151
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
I spent a LOT of time comparing it, a/b, to logic's tape echo plugin. so long as you keep the knobs in the same place, don't use spring reverb, and don't overdrive it, so long as you cut some of the highs and lows on the plugin with it's built in sliders for this, you can get the plugin to sound near indistinguishable to the re-201. the minor differences aren't about quality but eq.
I have the RE-201 and agree regarding Logic's simple but powerful tape delay - its fantastic and I use it all the time when it comes to delay (and some time the H-Delay). Regarding the sound I could easily sell my RE-201. But it's about the mojo, it has its own personality and behaves a little bit different every day. In music productions I use the tape delay in Logic as it is convenient. When play around for getting inspiration, or just getting lost in space, I use the RE-201.
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #152
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matucha's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
if it was cheap and no maintenance, of course, why not have the real thing. but it's neither. a cheap re-150 prob makes sense, but not an re-201 at today's prices.
One mans gold ;-) ... my tape echoes would be the last things I'd sell if I was forced to sell.

To my surprise RE201 isn't that expensive compared to what people want for RE501 these days.
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #153
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matucha View Post
To my surprise RE201 isn't that expensive compared to what people want for RE501 these days.
I don't understand this hype about the RE501. Probably something to do with the feature set but nothing is really mind blowing.

I have both the 201 and 501 and the 501 sounds like garbage in comparison to my ears. Mind you, it's still cool, but has no magic whatsoever. I have 2 201's and man, there is really something there that is special. Both of mine sound uniquely different from one another but equally as good. The older model I have has more splashy/twangy reverb that sounds very good in the upper mids while the later one sounds very balanced overall. I can't get enough of space echos for some reason... I've owned about 5 total now and would probably buy more if they came up for sale at a good price... I think I'll always try and own 2 201's at all times.
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #154
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adhmzaiusz View Post
I don't understand this hype about the RE501. Probably something to do with the feature set but nothing is really mind blowing.

I have both the 201 and 501 and the 501 sounds like garbage in comparison to my ears. Mind you, it's still cool, but has no magic whatsoever. I have 2 201's and man, there is really something there that is special. Both of mine sound uniquely different from one another but equally as good. The older model I have has more splashy/twangy reverb that sounds very good in the upper mids while the later one sounds very balanced overall. I can't get enough of space echos for some reason... I've owned about 5 total now and would probably buy more if they came up for sale at a good price... I think I'll always try and own 2 201's at all times.
I agree, the 501 is too clean. The 301 strikes a better balance between features and grit.

I have a love/hate relationship with the 201. I regretted selling my first (made in the mid 70's) and I find my current second one (late 80's) just doesn't have the same vibe.

In the meantime I've discovered the Multivox MX-201 and it's rapidly becoming my favorite go-to tape echo. I always wanted a Korg Stage Echo for the interesting features (push button selection for playback heads, reverb can be added to echoes and feedback, sound on sound) but they are very clean sounding, much like the RE-501. The Multivox has many of the Korg features -- including selecting the echo and feedback heads separately, "swell" reverb on echoes and feedback which can get pretty insane, and a very useful sound on sound that doesn't annoyingly erase your loop (like the Rolands) and you can also 'lock in' the current loop with a footswitch -- but it also has the grit that I liked about my original 201. I'm seriously contemplating selling my 201 and a few other tape echoes in my stable because this little gem covers a lot of the bases I wanted from tape. Bonus: can be found for much cheaper than any Roland echo.
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
I agree, the 501 is too clean. The 301 strikes a better balance between features and grit.

I have a love/hate relationship with the 201. I regretted selling my first (made in the mid 70's) and I find my current second one (late 80's) just doesn't have the same vibe.

In the meantime I've discovered the Multivox MX-201 and it's rapidly becoming my favorite go-to tape echo. I always wanted a Korg Stage Echo for the interesting features (push button selection for playback heads, reverb can be added to echoes and feedback, sound on sound) but they are very clean sounding, much like the RE-501. The Multivox has many of the Korg features -- including selecting the echo and feedback heads separately, "swell" reverb on echoes and feedback which can get pretty insane, and a very useful sound on sound that doesn't annoyingly erase your loop (like the Rolands) and you can also 'lock in' the current loop with a footswitch -- but it also has the grit that I liked about my original 201. I'm seriously contemplating selling my 201 and a few other tape echoes in my stable because this little gem covers a lot of the bases I wanted from tape. Bonus: can be found for much cheaper than any Roland echo.
Wow! The Multivox looks beautiful!
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Old 11th June 2017
  #156
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I had an SRE555. Was very unreliable and the sound was at best 'nice'. Ended up selling it.
Old 11th June 2017
  #157
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I also think 201 is the one that should cost premium over 501, because it just sounds more special. That said I like them both and use them both about the same. Korg SE500 is perhaps cleaner than 201, but it's cleaner in a very good way. It feels as if the electronics are out of the way and you get more of the tape color. Rolands feel less dynamic and to have very similar color no matter how hard you hit them. Oh and I hate how RE201 clips on input.
Old 11th June 2017
  #158
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I'd like to cast another vote for the RE-301 as a good middle ground with enough grit from the older Space Echo units (post-1980) and the notably cleaner RE-501 but preserving the reliability of the latter.
Someone asked about the differences between Space Echo and the Chorus Echos and how the higher prices were unjustified. It's a world of a difference in practical features in fact:

- Chorus Echos (301/501/555) obviously have chorus and it's a different flavor form the classic Roland chorus in synths. It's slow and pitch shifty, so it works very nicely with glassy guitars but when applying it to other material it reinforces the wow and flutter from the tape, like a slow LFO applied to the pitch. It's perfect to give any material an "old tape" feel, apart from what the tape mechanism can provide additionally.

- Single repeat mode: chorus echos have single repeats, so there's this trick (I later heard Adrian Utley from Portishead was a fan of doing this too) where 0 intensity and shortest delay time essentially gives you just the tape saturation as an effect, becoming a tape processor where you control the output quality with the tape speed.

- Pre-amp: a huge part of the Roland Space Echo and Chorus Echo sound is in the preamp and the overload saturation it provides. The one on the RE-301 is specially nice and it's an essential part of the guitar sound of Brian Selzer for example, to the point of being cloned as a separate pedal many guitarists appreciate. It absolutely works wonders on synths and other recording material too.

- CV controlled repeat rate: both the RE-301 and 501/555 feature this (one of the highlights of the Korg SE500 that always gets mentioned) and it's an invaluable source of experimentation and fun.

In general I think these features do justify the premium price over regular Space Echoes, specially the RE-301 which keeps all the good grit but none of the inconveniences (humming and unwanted noise) with an incredible feature set, as well as the better reliability of the later models.
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #159
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Rob Ocelot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by autoy View Post
- Single repeat mode: chorus echos have single repeats, so there's this trick (I later heard Adrian Utley from Portishead was a fan of doing this too) where 0 intensity and shortest delay time essentially gives you just the tape saturation as an effect, becoming a tape processor where you control the output quality with the tape speed.
This is essentially using the first head in single echo modes with a completely wet signal (and yes, there is a slight lag depending on the tape speed). You can do this on the 201 but the Chorus Echoes have a convenient button to turn off the dry signal. If you don't turn off the dry you'll get a slapback.

Quote:
- CV controlled repeat rate: both the RE-301 and 501/555 feature this (one of the highlights of the Korg SE500 that always gets mentioned) and it's an invaluable source of experimentation and fun.
The Roland ones are actually expression pedal inputs (not sure on the Korg ones, but the manuals state -5V to +5v so it looks like it's made for an MS-01) so it provides a reference voltage on a TRS which is attenuated and returned on another channel on the same cable. With some creative plugging you can just feed the return voltage with CV but I've heard of people either burning out the motors (feeding it CV above it's tolerances) or saturating the expression input this way (shorting the reference to the return and pumping more current than expected through it) where the tape speed becomes temporarily 'stuck'.

There are some interesting debates regarding the 301 and 501 over which has the more useful sound on sound. The 301 places the SOS head near the start of the head chain (before the erase head) and the 501 puts it at the end of the chain. However, a big minus of the Roland machines is they don't deactivate the erase head -- so your loop only plays one more time before getting erased. Another minus is that reverb and feedback are NOT included in the SOS -- you'll hear the verb on the dry signal and feedback on the initial delay though.

The Korg SE-500 does deactivate the erase head so you can properly overdub multiple times onto the loop. The Korg also uses the SOS head as a 'long' delay head effectively making it 4 playback head machine. SE-500 sadly has no reverb like the SE-300 (but the 300 doesn't have SOS or the long delay).

One of the reasons why I'm digging the Multivox is that it also uses the SOS as a fourth delay head (like the Korg) and allows both feedback and reverb in the SOS signal -- and you can use a footswitch to stop new recording to the loop and then play on top of the looping signal without making it too muddy. It doesn't have CV in to the motor, but that's why I keep a RE-301 (also for the chorus).

Last edited by Rob Ocelot; 11th June 2017 at 09:01 PM..
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
You can do this on the 201 but the Chorus Echoes have a convenient button to turn off the dry signal. If you don't turn off the dry you'll get a slapback.
Interesting, how can this be done on the 201?
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #161
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Quote:
Originally Posted by our_soul View Post
Interesting, how can this be done on the 201?
You need to use "form PA" input. There is a switch built into that socket that turns off the DRY signal when something is plugged in. And yes you can use other inputs too at that point. So a dummy jack plugged in the "from PA" does the job.
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #162
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matucha View Post
You need to use "form PA" input. There is a switch built into that socket that turns off the DRY signal when something is plugged in. And yes you can use other inputs too at that point. So a dummy jack plugged in the "from PA" does the job.
Aha! Thank you - must try this out
Old 11th June 2017 | Show parent
  #163
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autoy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
This is essentially using the first head in single echo modes with a completely wet signal (and yes, there is a slight lag depending on the tape speed). You can do this on the 201 but the Chorus Echoes have a convenient button to turn off the dry signal. If you don't turn off the dry you'll get a slapback.



The Roland ones are actually expression pedal inputs (not sure on the Korg ones, but the manuals state -5V to +5v so it looks like it's made for an MS-01) so it provides a reference voltage on a TRS which is attenuated and returned on another channel on the same cable. With some creative plugging you can just feed the return voltage with CV but I've heard of people either burning out the motors (feeding it CV above it's tolerances) or saturating the expression input this way (shorting the reference to the return and pumping more current than expected through it) where the tape speed becomes temporarily 'stuck'.

There are some interesting debates regarding the 301 and 501 over which has the more useful sound on sound. The 301 places the SOS head near the start of the head chain (before the erase head) and the 501 puts it at the end of the chain. However, a big minus of the Roland machines is they don't deactivate the erase head -- so your loop only plays one more time before getting erased. Another minus is that reverb and feedback are NOT included in the SOS -- you'll hear the verb on the dry signal and feedback on the initial delay though.

The Korg SE-500 doesn't deactivate the erase head so you can properly overdub multiple times onto the loop. The Korg also uses the SOS head as a 'long' delay head effectively making it 4 playback head machine. SE-500 sadly has no reverb like the SE-300 (but the 300 doesn't have SOS or the long delay).

One of the reasons why I'm digging the Multivox is that it also uses the SOS as a fourth delay head (like the Korg) and allows both feedback and reverb in the SOS signal -- and you can use a footswitch to stop new recording to the loop and then play on top of the looping signal without making it too muddy. It doesn't have CV in to the motor, but that's why I keep a RE-301 (also for the chorus).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
This is essentially using the first head in single echo modes with a completely wet signal (and yes, there is a slight lag depending on the tape speed). You can do this on the 201 but the Chorus Echoes have a convenient button to turn off the dry signal. If you don't turn off the dry you'll get a slapback.



The Roland ones are actually expression pedal inputs (not sure on the Korg ones, but the manuals state -5V to +5v so it looks like it's made for an MS-01) so it provides a reference voltage on a TRS which is attenuated and returned on another channel on the same cable. With some creative plugging you can just feed the return voltage with CV but I've heard of people either burning out the motors (feeding it CV above it's tolerances) or saturating the expression input this way (shorting the reference to the return and pumping more current than expected through it) where the tape speed becomes temporarily 'stuck'.

There are some interesting debates regarding the 301 and 501 over which has the more useful sound on sound. The 301 places the SOS head near the start of the head chain (before the erase head) and the 501 puts it at the end of the chain. However, a big minus of the Roland machines is they don't deactivate the erase head -- so your loop only plays one more time before getting erased. Another minus is that reverb and feedback are NOT included in the SOS -- you'll hear the verb on the dry signal and feedback on the initial delay though.

The Korg SE-500 doesn't deactivate the erase head so you can properly overdub multiple times onto the loop. The Korg also uses the SOS head as a 'long' delay head effectively making it 4 playback head machine. SE-500 sadly has no reverb like the SE-300 (but the 300 doesn't have SOS or the long delay).

One of the reasons why I'm digging the Multivox is that it also uses the SOS as a fourth delay head (like the Korg) and allows both feedback and reverb in the SOS signal -- and you can use a footswitch to stop new recording to the loop and then play on top of the looping signal without making it too muddy. It doesn't have CV in to the motor, but that's why I keep a RE-301 (also for the chorus).
Thanks a lot for the insightful comments. Indeed I tried the rate control with an expression pedal but my aim would be to control the CV with an SQ-1 within a limited and controlled range. I will think about doing so due to possible overvoltage and motor burnout, as I've also read about these possible issues.

Indeed I did not mention the dry switch in the Chorus Echos being fundamental for the processing trick, thanks for pointing that out. It can be somewhat replicated with other units using the "wet only" inputs but having a dedicated switch is so much more convenient.

The other feature I've yet to try in the Chorus Echo is the utility of having different effects applied to the 2 separate outputs, described in the manual as "pseudo stereo" although it really has nothing to do with stereo. Interesting nevertheless, to use each output as a separate effects return.

I don't consider sound on sound on the Rolands as a looper but rather a very long single repeater which works good for some applications. As a looper indeed it comes short but I don't think that's the point in the case of Roland echos.

The Multivox machine you mention looks incredible too, great set of features, but I'd have to listen to one in person to see if tonally is up there with other vintage units.

Furthermore and adding to your comparison between 201s and 301s, I've had the chance to listen to a well preserved mid-80s 201 and I really couldn't tell the difference with my own 301 in the tape delay department. The preamps did seem to overdrive in a different way and I did like better the one in the 301, at least with guitars.

Love this thread, keep the love for Roland echos going.
Old 12th June 2017 | Show parent
  #164
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Quote:
Originally Posted by autoy View Post
The other feature I've yet to try in the Chorus Echo is the utility of having different effects applied to the 2 separate outputs, described in the manual as "pseudo stereo" although it really has nothing to do with stereo. Interesting nevertheless, to use each output as a separate effects return.
I believe this just separates the dry and wet signals across two outputs but I'll test it on the 301 when I get home tonight. This pseudo stereo scheme is on a lot of other Roland products that have a bucket brigade chorus - where the dry and the delayed/phased signal are on L and R outputs respectively. Jupiter 4 is a good example. I wouldn't be surprised if the Chorus Echoes output their chorus in this way as well. The second output is a switch jack so if there's nothing in it then you get the mono mix out of the main output.
Old 12th June 2017 | Show parent
  #165
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autoy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
I believe this just separates the dry and wet signals across two outputs but I'll test it on the 301 when I get home tonight. This pseudo stereo scheme is on a lot of other Roland products that have a bucket brigade chorus - where the dry and the delayed/phased signal are on L and R outputs respectively. Jupiter 4 is a good example. I wouldn't be surprised if the Chorus Echoes output their chorus in this way as well. The second output is a switch jack so if there's nothing in it then you get the mono mix out of the main output.
Yes but it also separates the reverb, delay, SoS and chorus according to the following scheme from the user manual (attached). Which kinda begs the question: is the chorus a true stereo chorus?
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Is the RE-201 worth owning today?-fullsizeoutput_1d43.jpg  
Old 12th June 2017
  #166
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For thumb nut replacements for the tape cover there seems to be a lot of options on eBay. Does anyone know which thread size would the Roland Echos use? (M6, M7, M8 and so on). Knowing this size exactly would make it easy enough to find replacements online.

Edit: nut size seems to perfectly fit M3. I'll be looking for some eBay replacements and report back.
Old 6th July 2017
  #167
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Ok, so thumb nuts arrived and they perfectly fit the space echos tape chamber and look perfect. Here's a link if anyone needs them, they're very cheap, well built in stainless steel: https://www.ebay.es/itm/272590339593
Old 7th July 2017
  #168
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I tell you one thing these are hell to work on. Anyone have any tips?
Old 7th July 2017 | Show parent
  #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pelican View Post
I tell you one thing these are hell to work on. Anyone have any tips?
If you can access and work on the boards without removing them then a Hakko 808 or FR-300 are your best friends. I don't think I've encountered a tape delay that *doesn't* have the boards in awkward places and weren't a pain in the ass to take apart. Reverb tanks are a pain, the RCA plugs always seem to go intermittent or come completely loose. Roland started to tie wrap the plugs at one point.

I recently fixed the inputs on the Multivox which were too quiet and the VU meter wasn't working right -- had to just plow it with signal to get it to budge. Bad ground on a dual opamp was the culprit (one side of the amp was the instrument inputs and the other side was the driver for the VU meter). While I had it open I also took the opportunity to socket the opamp and experiment with different generations (read as cleanliness) of op amps. This is a late 70's built tape echo, using technology from the late 60's. Some very interesting results -- and I've kept a more modern (ok, 1980's) op amp in there -- the Mic inputs still have the original 741's there if I want the old grit. Works a treat now.
Old 7th July 2017
  #170
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I own a 301 - and I have always wanted the 201. Mine is need of a service

The sound great. May one day I'll find me a 201.
Old 7th July 2017 | Show parent
  #171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
If you can access and work on the boards without removing them then a Hakko 808 or FR-300 are your best friends. I don't think I've encountered a tape delay that *doesn't* have the boards in awkward places and weren't a pain in the ass to take apart. Reverb tanks are a pain, the RCA plugs always seem to go intermittent or come completely loose. Roland started to tie wrap the plugs at one point.

I recently fixed the inputs on the Multivox which were too quiet and the VU meter wasn't working right -- had to just plow it with signal to get it to budge. Bad ground on a dual opamp was the culprit (one side of the amp was the instrument inputs and the other side was the driver for the VU meter). While I had it open I also took the opportunity to socket the opamp and experiment with different generations (read as cleanliness) of op amps. This is a late 70's built tape echo, using technology from the late 60's. Some very interesting results -- and I've kept a more modern (ok, 1980's) op amp in there -- the Mic inputs still have the original 741's there if I want the old grit. Works a treat now.
Yeah, the way it's set up looks like you have to take the whole thing apart
Old 11th July 2017 | Show parent
  #172
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autoy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
I believe this just separates the dry and wet signals across two outputs but I'll test it on the 301 when I get home tonight. This pseudo stereo scheme is on a lot of other Roland products that have a bucket brigade chorus - where the dry and the delayed/phased signal are on L and R outputs respectively. Jupiter 4 is a good example. I wouldn't be surprised if the Chorus Echoes output their chorus in this way as well. The second output is a switch jack so if there's nothing in it then you get the mono mix out of the main output.
Hooked up the RE-301 to the mixer finally, mono send and stereo return. Indeed the Chorus is stereo and it sounds so much better this way. With the other effects hard panned this thing sounds just glorious, so spacious and wide. This might be one of the best features to prefer a Chorus Echo over a Space Echo, no doubt.
Old 12th July 2017
  #173
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Audio example of RE-301 in mono to stereo effect, all 3 activated: https://clyp.it/2egy5svs
Old 28th August 2018
  #174
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Ok, a little update on Space Echo CV inputs. They aren't CV inputs nor are they expression pedal inputs -- so dont go plugging CV into them.

The RE-301 manual states you plug the 'out' jack of a Roland FV-2 pedal into the 'remote' jack to control tape speed. The FV-2 is a simple volume pedal with a second pot that controls the minimum volume out. I initially thought "Huh? That makes no sense, you run stuff through a volume pedal not out of it"

Did some detective work with the schematics for both the RE-301 and the FV-2:


The highlighted area shows the 'remote' input circuit on the RE-301. It's a mono switch jack that puts a 20k pot across ground through a 1.5k resistor. When you plug something into the jack the 20k pot is out of the circuit.


The FV-2 also has a 20k pot so plugging the output into the RE-301 remote input essentially relocates the 20k speed pot outside the Chorus Echo. That's it. I assume the input and ouput jacks are mono switch jacks, so if something isn't plugged into the FV input jack then it's a continuous ground between the input and ouput jacks and the 20k pot in the pedal behaves exactly like the speed knob in the echo.

So if you plugged CV into the remote jack you'd generate some resistance but nowhere near enough to have proper speed control which jibes with people's accounts of 'something happening, but nothing useful'. CV may eventually damage some other components making the motor speed unreliable.

So, is there a way to convert CV into variable resistance? Yes! This is one of the best uses for a vactrol. Sure enough someone in the modular world makes such a beast:

VAC-PAK CV to Variable Resistance – A Circuit Bender's Dream! | Synthrotek

This was originally intended for circuit benders to have an easy way to control pots with CV but it'll work here just as well because you are doing exactly the same thing when you plug that volume pedal into the tape echo.

What this means is you can easily add CV control to the Space Echoes that don't have them (RE-101/201, RE-150, and their progenators the RE-100/200).

Total cost: about 20 bucks.

Not bad. Not bad, at all.
Old 28th August 2018
  #175
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Great research Rob, thanks a lot. I never put the external pedal input to use (yet) but this clears things very much.
Old 30th September 2018
  #176
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Roland Space Echo RE 201 Reverb and adjustment.
Rediscovering my 201 lately. Just serviced it including a new reverb pan from MOD.
Wanted to share the improvements w/ all.
Been reading a lot of shortcomings on the old stock reverb sound.
Shane at echo fix has been really helpful w/ tips on his overhaul kit and also adjusting the reverb.
I realize now that when I got my latest 201 a few months ago, the reverb adjustment was cranked all the way up. It sounded really harsh and not very useable. Installed the new MOD reverb pan and adjusted the screw in the back panel and what a difference!
Im running the screw gain adjustment about 40-50% up vs previous totally cranked for old pan.This gives a healthy initial 30% up front on the reverb knob. Used subtly, it is now a very musical addition to the tape delay whilst playing guitar. Also very fun lush when cranked for dub mixing. Own a vintage 63 fender reverb unit and a Vicky Reverberato. This will never be that. However, still very useful in the space echo context. So for those of you who are on the fence w/ your old units, I can't recommend enough to follow up on getting your units some TLC and trying out a fresh reverb pan and adjustment. Given the value on these currently, its modest investment and fun geek out. Cheers!
Old 30th September 2018 | Show parent
  #177
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Topjimmy52 View Post
Roland Space Echo RE 201 Reverb and adjustment.
Rediscovering my 201 lately. Just serviced it including a new reverb pan from MOD.
Wanted to share the improvements w/ all.
Been reading a lot of shortcomings on the old stock reverb sound.
Shane at echo fix has been really helpful w/ tips on his overhaul kit and also adjusting the reverb.
I realize now that when I got my latest 201 a few months ago, the reverb adjustment was cranked all the way up. It sounded really harsh and not very useable. Installed the new MOD reverb pan and adjusted the screw in the back panel and what a difference!
Im running the screw gain adjustment about 40-50% up vs previous totally cranked for old pan.This gives a healthy initial 30% up front on the reverb knob. Used subtly, it is now a very musical addition to the tape delay whilst playing guitar. Also very fun lush when cranked for dub mixing. Own a vintage 63 fender reverb unit and a Vicky Reverberato. This will never be that. However, still very useful in the space echo context. So for those of you who are on the fence w/ your old units, I can't recommend enough to follow up on getting your units some TLC and trying out a fresh reverb pan and adjustment. Given the value on these currently, its modest investment and fun geek out. Cheers!
Thanks for sharing. How hard was the pan to install? I *hate* the harsh reverb on my 201. It’s just aweful. Can’t wait to do this mod.
Old 1st October 2018 | Show parent
  #178
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I have the Multivox MX-312 which is the exact same piece. I’ve also extensively used RE-201, RE-501, and Korg Stage Echo and to me there is no question the Multivox is the best of that bunch. Cooler sound, gritty, and just an interesting set of features that none of those others can even come close to emulating. I’ve had it for over a decade with minimal issue. Had some servicing done cheaply way back when and I bought a bunch of tape loops a couple years back 4 for $20. Definitely the best effect in my studio by far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
In the meantime I've discovered the Multivox MX-201 and it's rapidly becoming my favorite go-to tape echo. I always wanted a Korg Stage Echo for the interesting features (push button selection for playback heads, reverb can be added to echoes and feedback, sound on sound) but they are very clean sounding, much like the RE-501. The Multivox has many of the Korg features -- including selecting the echo and feedback heads separately, "swell" reverb on echoes and feedback which can get pretty insane, and a very useful sound on sound that doesn't annoyingly erase your loop (like the Rolands) and you can also 'lock in' the current loop with a footswitch -- but it also has the grit that I liked about my original 201. I'm seriously contemplating selling my 201 and a few other tape echoes in my stable because this little gem covers a lot of the bases I wanted from tape. Bonus: can be found for much cheaper than any Roland echo.
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