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ROFLMAO the 90's! Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 7th September 2011
  #1
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AnalogGuy's Avatar
ROFLMAO the 90's!

When taking a look at my **** SOS magazine, there's an article about old analogue synthesizers. At the bottom there was this list which might feel like a joke in these days! It's incredible view of the time. I underlined notable things and bolded prices.


BEST BUYS (MONOPHONICS):

Moog MiniMoog (1971).
All-time classic with three oscillators per note, straightfoward controls, and distinctive sound. No programmability. Still tend to be temperament. Expect to pay between £400-£500 for non-midi'd model in good condition.

Roland SH-101 (1982).
Simple, powerful synth; the last mono made by Roland. Has useful arpeggiator and sequencer, but only one oscillator per voice (plus sub oscillator). Most sought-after mono today, especially for bass work. Prices from £100-£150.

Korg MS10 (1978).
Chunky-looking single oscillator model (MS20: 2 osc) with patch-bay. Not the most powerful sounds, but interesting. Good for effects, and learning about analogue programming. Pay no more than £100.

Sequential Pro-One (1981).
Prophet type controls and sounds, with arpeggiator and sequencer. Good modulation permutations. Powerful if not terribly reliable. Rarely seen, but should cost £100-£150.

OSC OSCar (1983).
British swansong: very powerful in all departments - sounds, programming, memories (36) and even midi on later models (1984). Owners seldom want to part with them, so they're quite hard to find; expect to pay around £300 when you find one.

ARP Odyssey (1972).
Quirky rival of the MiniMoog. Not very controllable, nor particulary stable, but powerful and expressive in right hands. Definite boffin-appeal. Will cost around £200. Not bad when you think they listed at some £1200 in the 1970s!


GOLDEN OLDIES (POLYPHONICS):

Sequential Prophet 5 (1978).
Classic analogue sounds, though not as easy to program as some would have you believe. Never the most reliable instrument, but examples that work today will probably continue to do so. MIDI came as retrofit. 5-voice polyphony. General asking price around £500.

Yamaha CS-80 (1978)
Extremely heavy and bulky instrument capable of some blistering brass sounds. Many unique features including velocity sensitivity and much sought-after pitch ribbon. Ring modulation good, as are offers of both glissando and portamento. A player's treat. Prices vary enormously but around £400-£500 is reasonable.

Roland Jupiter 8 (1981).
Controllable but powerful poly capable of whole range of tones, from gentle to blitzkrieg, using cross modulation etc. Generous 8-voice polyphony. A range of Roland interfaces eventually brought it into line with MIDI, thought a third party modification will be simpler today. Sought-after, hence £700-£750 typical asking price.

Roland Juno 6/60 (1982).
Use of digitally controlled oscillators confusing at the time. Still an analogue instrument. The 6 and 60 are identical save for memories - the Juno 6 doesn't have any. Superb all-rounder, especially good for bass and sequencer lines since it has wonderfully resonant depth. Generally reliable. DCB interface can be linked to MIDI via another box, but directly MIDI upgrade probably best bet. A bargain at typical price of £250 (Juno 60).

Roland MKS 80 (1984).
A rare beast; an analogue synth module. Based loosely upon Roland's Jupiter 8 and Jupiter 6. As such this is a highly sought-after instrument. Clean but powerful sounds and a reasonable MIDI spec to boot. Not easy to program without an MPG80 programmer or suitable editing software, but still £1000+ if you can persuade anyone to part with one.

Korg Polysix (1982).
Korg's answer to the Juno 60, and not far behind either. Excellent at percussive sounds, and the unison feature is very useful for bass/lead lines. Similar price range to Juno 60 at £220-£275.

Oberheim OBXa (1981).
Big, gutsy American sounds a speciality. Very princy and dance-orientated. The whole OB family (incl. OB8, OBX, OBSX) makes interesting listening. Relatively easy to programme - nothing like as complex as Oberheim's later Xpander/Matrix 12 offerings. Prices of OBXa range from £400-£500.




I certainly want to buy MiniMoog for £500, or CS-80 for £500!!! It's reasonable price, isn't it!!! heh

Anyone invented the time machine yet? I wanna buy them all for such prices!


Old 7th September 2011
  #2
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dhollmusik's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogGuy View Post
ARP Odyssey (1972).
Quirky rival of the MiniMoog. Not very controllable, nor particulary stable, but powerful and expressive in right hands. Definite boffin-appeal. Will cost around £200. Not bad when you think they listed at some £1200 in the 1970s!
£1200?? No way! I'd never pay that for an Arp Odyssey.


Old 7th September 2011
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogGuy View Post

Anyone invented the time machine yet?

Go back in time and you could invent wobble bass
Old 7th September 2011
  #4
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogGuy View Post

Roland MKS 80 (1984).
A rare beast; an analogue synth module. Based loosely upon Roland's Jupiter 8 and Jupiter 6. As such this is a highly sought-after instrument. Clean but powerful sounds and a reasonable MIDI spec to boot. Not easy to program without an MPG80 programmer or suitable editing software, but still £1000+ if you can persuade anyone to part with one.
they still go for around the same dont they? i just sold my mks80 for $1000. still have the programmer; someone buy it please!
Old 7th September 2011
  #5
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and what does that say us about plug in synths?
Old 7th September 2011
  #6
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oldgearguy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogGuy View Post
When taking a look at my **** SOS magazine, there's an article about old analogue synthesizers. At the bottom there was this list which might feel like a joke in these days! It's incredible view of the time. I underlined notable things and bolded prices.



I certainly want to buy MiniMoog for £500, or CS-80 for £500!!! It's reasonable price, isn't it!!! heh

Anyone invented the time machine yet? I wanna buy them all for such prices!


I was there in the late 80's, early 90's buying that gear for those prices (or less. $150 for both an EML-101 and the 400/401 sequencer...).

It was a good time, never to be seen again; time to move on and use what you have.
Old 7th September 2011
  #7
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AnalogGuy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by watari banzai View Post
they still go for around the same dont they? i just sold my mks80 for $1000. still have the programmer; someone buy it please!
For you information 1,000.00 GBP = 1,593.45 USD


Yes, it's pretty mystery why the MKS-80 hold it's value so high and so long that it's actually cheaper even now than in 90's!

Maybe it's got something to do with being polyphonic VCO analog and compact 2U rack, and not to forget the Jupiter name heh
Old 7th September 2011
  #8
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MarcB's Avatar
I remember reading those prices and then checking their classifieds section and the prices quoted were out usually by about £300-400 even then.
Old 7th September 2011
  #9
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AbsoluteSpirit's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcB View Post
I remember reading those prices and then checking their classifieds section and the prices quoted were out usually by about £300-400 even then.
Wasn't that because the prices jumped as soon as they reviewed something in retro corner? (or whatever it was called)

I'm pretty sure the cheetah sampler is the only thing you can still get at the same price...
Old 7th September 2011
  #10
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depulse's Avatar
The only thing that has not had a 5-10 times increase is the MKS80. It was one of the few analogs that never was cheap during this period. It somehow has lost it's status in recent years though.
Old 7th September 2011
  #11
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depulse's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by watari banzai View Post
still have the programmer; someone buy it please!
Are you in the US?
Old 7th September 2011
  #12
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgearguy View Post
I was there in the late 80's, early 90's buying that gear for those prices (or less. $150 for both an EML-101 and the 400/401 sequencer...).

Dude
Old 7th September 2011
  #13
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remote337's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by watari banzai View Post
they still go for around the same dont they? i just sold my mks80 for $1000. still have the programmer; someone buy it please!
I'll buy it, how much do you want and where are you?
Old 7th September 2011
  #14
That was 20 years ago, and yes, the best of the no longer made synths have gone up in price.
I started buying my old synths around then, but while being approachable, I don't think anyone thought they were cheap bargains.
Old 7th September 2011
  #15
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ARIEL's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by watari banzai View Post
they still go for around the same dont they? i just sold my mks80 for $1000. still have the programmer; someone buy it please!
Just curiuos as to why you sold it ? and what did you get in place of it ? I have been digging the sounds of that unit and being a rack seems convenient for sure .
Old 8th September 2011
  #16
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the 90's ...

i'll see your ~400 minimoog and raise you...

24 tracks of digital recording/playback 8 inputs/outputs simultaneous at 18 bit 48khz with non-linear editing and 4 band parametric eq and delay and reverb on every channel
~60,000

today

minimoog ~3000

48 tracks of simultaneous digital recording at 24 bit 96khz with non-linear editing and unlimited effects on every channel ~4000

choose your poison. you could afford a studio full of gear back then, but could only afford to record 2 tracks at any kind of acceptable quality for a release.

now you can afford a studio full of gear and the tools to properly record and mix it all too. granted you can't afford a studio full of analog synths, but there are a ton of cheap poly v.a. synths and fm and older pcm stuff available nowadays. back then a sampler was what a jupiter 8 costs today and today a sampler costs what a ms-20 did. priorities changed, technology changed, what is valuable and what is common swapped places.


personally i lived that period and getting whatever synth you wanted cheap was great. the issue was no one else got to hear it cause recording it all cost a fortune. now you can buy a collectible synth and the whole world can hear it cause recording it properly is cheap and distribution is free.


personally i prefer now to then. and i lived through then. believe me when i say mixers you could afford new sucked ass. effects were crap if you could afford them. recording was done on dat if you spent $1200, or super vhs if you only had $200. computer daws were all midi only, etc...
Old 8th September 2011
  #17
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ARIEL's Avatar
Yes , when I bought my K-2000 with the sampling option , I paid from what I remember 800 $ for 8 megs of ram... But boy was I able to sample a lot and with the back up drive through scsi it wasn't too bad . A big upgrade from the Roland rack mount sample which was only 1/2 a meg I think .
Old 8th September 2011
  #18
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blinky909's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgearguy View Post
I was there in the late 80's, early 90's buying that gear for those prices (or less. $150 for both an EML-101 and the 400/401 sequencer...).

It was a good time, never to be seen again; time to move on and use what you have.
i jumped in right at the end of the good fishing. when things doubled in price, i sold them for a down payment for a house - silly me, i could have seen a four fold increase over 15 years

now i just need an SEM and i'm all set, good thing they sell a modern version
Old 8th September 2011
  #19
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARIEL View Post
Just curiuos as to why you sold it ? and what did you get in place of it ? I have been digging the sounds of that unit and being a rack seems convenient for sure .
a baby
Old 8th September 2011
  #20
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blinky909's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by watari banzai View Post
a baby
i have two, you could have asked and i would have given you one of mine
Old 8th September 2011
  #21
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beingmf's Avatar
 

Even worse, if you go back just a few years: I have German "Keyboards" magazines from the mid-80's with Minimoogs offered for 250 DM (the rough equivalent to 175$). You don't want to know the prices for early 16-bit samplers though. Ouch!
Old 8th September 2011
  #22
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CoolColJ's Avatar
 

remebers selling a 808 and 303 for $100 to an English DJ on a working holiday

And not buying that $700 OBXa, and OScar Mk7
While spending $2500 on that Korg Wavestation I sold for $500+ a few months back...
Old 8th September 2011
  #23
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beingmf's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoolColJ View Post
remebers selling a 808 and 303 for $100 to an English DJ on a working holiday
Aargh – now that you say it: I also skipped buying 2 or 3 or even 4 "cheap looking silver boxes" for 80 DM each (40€), when a small music shop closed down in 86.
Old 3rd October 2011
  #24
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7 Hz's Avatar
I was shopping for a drum machine in about '91. Think I had about £500 in my pocket.

Looking in the shop, I saw a funny old keyboard with knobs all over, they wanted £450 for it!!! Think it was called mini-something

In local ads, saw a drum machine for sale, £150, Went to see it, and turned it down because it looked old fashioned in a big box with with sliders all over it. SP12...

Bought a Roland R5 instead

Minimoog is what, £3000 now, and SP12? Maybe £1000. So that is £4000 worth of gear in todays prices, could have had for £600.

Still, the R5 WAS more modern, and I did a bunch with it, so hey ho.
Old 3rd October 2011
  #25
note how the MKS80 was more than the jupiter8. it was like that for a long long time. only in the last 6 years or so has the jupe really shot up. i got mine with midi in 2002 for £1000. back then - pre ebay - it was a buyers market.
Old 3rd October 2011
  #26
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Westlaker's Avatar
Whenever these threads come up I have to tell the story of how my friend bought a 2600 for $250, and then, several months later, but another 2600, again for $250. Unfortunately, he didn't think much of my suggestion that he sell one of them to me for $250...
Old 3rd October 2011
  #27
I agree with these prices.
Old 4th October 2011
  #28
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NEXUS-6's Avatar
 

Under valued then? Or over valued now?

I think we are lucky to live in the digital age. I remember buying a Yamaha 4 track back in the 80's and boy did it sound like **** compared to what we can do now.
I also remember a story about a big music shop in West L.A.
having a bunch of 303's that they could not give away so they ended up tossing them under a steam roller that was paving the road
Old 4th October 2011
  #29
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blame my mums vagina for ploping me out too late
Old 4th October 2011
  #30
prices in the year 2039?
Minimoog D $3990
Yamaha DX-7 $44000 (ultra rare ICs)
Korg Triton $90000 (most were lost in a freak accident)

or maybe not? heh
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