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what sort of synthesiser is the korg n5? Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 7th September 2011
  #1
Registered User
 

what sort of synthesiser is the korg n5?

can't find it anywhere but I'm guessing its additive synthesis since i read somewhere a lot of korg synthesisers from the 90s were additive synthesisers. its either additive or subtractive i think. anyone know?
Old 7th September 2011
  #2
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by realist22 View Post
can't find it anywhere but I'm guessing its additive synthesis
No. The number of additive synthesizers is actually really low.

They are sample-based synthesizers, with a subtractive-ish structure (much like the Roland JV/XP, Alesis QS, etc.), but what spoils it is that they have non-resonant digital filters (like the Alesis QS).

What they do have to compensate is a resonant digital filter as an insert effect - but that's a weak compensation at best; can't control it with envelopes. Before the M1, there were the FM synths (DS8, 707) licensed from Yamaha (calling those "additive" is a stretch, as most people would simply call it DX-style FM synthesis) and the single cycle waveform synths like the DW8000/DW6000 (some waveforms were generated with additive synthesis, but the rest of the chain is completely subtractive).

Quote:
since i read somewhere a lot of korg synthesisers from the 90s were additive synthesisers.
Virtually all synthesizers except for the Z1/Prophecy were sample-based (in other words subtractive); this lasted until the MS2000 was released, which was virtual analog (also subtractive).

Quote:
its either additive or subtractive i think.
This is such a night-and-day difference that you can't really make it an "either/or". heh Kawai made a few additive synths during that time, not Korg.
Old 7th September 2011
  #3
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Rob Ocelot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by realist22 View Post
can't find it anywhere but I'm guessing its additive synthesis since i read somewhere a lot of korg synthesisers from the 90s were additive synthesisers. its either additive or subtractive i think. anyone know?
First two hits on Google:

Korg N5

KORG N5 - Specifications, pictures, prices, links, reviews and ratings


Before you start throwing around synthesis terms like 'additive' or 'subtractive' you'd better bone up on what they mean:

Planet Of Tunes - Synthesis types
Old 7th September 2011
  #4
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This guy and his questions! The gall!!
Old 7th September 2011
  #5
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by trashman View Post
This guy and his questions! The gall!!
Nothing wrong with asking questions, but why wait 15 minutes for an irate human to answer when you could have it in 5 seconds by a friendly search engine?
Old 7th September 2011
  #6
Registered User
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
First two hits on Google:

Korg N5

KORG N5 - Specifications, pictures, prices, links, reviews and ratings


Before you start throwing around synthesis terms like 'additive' or 'subtractive' you'd better bone up on what they mean:

Planet Of Tunes - Synthesis types
lol I'm still learning. good links cheers!
Old 7th September 2011
  #7
Registered User
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoozer View Post
No. The number of additive synthesizers is actually really low.

They are sample-based synthesizers, with a subtractive-ish structure (much like the Roland JV/XP, Alesis QS, etc.), but what spoils it is that they have non-resonant digital filters (like the Alesis QS).

What they do have to compensate is a resonant digital filter as an insert effect - but that's a weak compensation at best; can't control it with envelopes. Before the M1, there were the FM synths (DS8, 707) licensed from Yamaha (calling those "additive" is a stretch, as most people would simply call it DX-style FM synthesis) and the single cycle waveform synths like the DW8000/DW6000 (some waveforms were generated with additive synthesis, but the rest of the chain is completely subtractive).


Virtually all synthesizers except for the Z1/Prophecy were sample-based (in other words subtractive); this lasted until the MS2000 was released, which was virtual analog (also subtractive).


This is such a night-and-day difference that you can't really make it an "either/or". heh Kawai made a few additive synths during that time, not Korg.
hmm VERY interesting.
Old 7th September 2011
  #8
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
If you want to quickly check out what additive synthesis sounds like, take a look at Morphine or CUBE or Alchemy - Additive Synth, VA, Granular, Sampler - VSTi Instrument, Audio Units plugin

It doesn't have a real character in the sense that analogs have it and virtually all existing additive synthesizers have a horrible user interface, so it's not like the plugins are a weak copy of the original.
Old 7th September 2011
  #9
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dhollmusik's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Ocelot View Post
Before you start throwing around synthesis terms like 'additive' or 'subtractive' you'd better bone up on what they mean:
I never thought looking up synthesis terminology could make one horny...but if you say so
Old 7th September 2011
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhollmusik View Post
I never thought looking up synthesis terminology could make one horny...but if you say so
Lol. I shouldn't be drinking already, but I am. That made me laugh. "bone up" haha! Too funny. Lol ... ; P
I'm gonna bone up to my virus C heh
Old 15th September 2016
  #11
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by realist22 View Post
can't find it anywhere but I'm guessing its additive synthesis since i read somewhere a lot of korg synthesisers from the 90s were additive synthesisers. its either additive or subtractive i think. anyone know?
I dunno,

Does it sound like [email protected]%it?

If I does, then it could possibly be additive,

See.... I have this turd with keys called a Kawaii K5, that has been a perpetual "Dutch-oven" in my studio for years.

So don't bone up on additive synthesis, the programing goes too deep, and they don't ease it up with a friendly interface to grease the grain a little, It's a hard, rough ride and a programming session usually ends up with a big mess on your hands,
Old 15th September 2016
  #12
Deleted User
Guest
Thanks, now the K5 is on my to buy list!
I like a challenge!


Quote:
Originally Posted by terrible.dee View Post
I dunno,

Does it sound like [email protected]%it?

If I does, then it could possibly be additive,

See.... I have this turd with keys called a Kawaii K5, that has been a perpetual "Dutch-oven" in my studio for years.

So don't bone up on additive synthesis, the programing goes too deep, and they don't ease it up with a friendly interface to grease the grain a little, It's a hard, rough ride and a programming session usually ends up with a big mess on your hands,
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