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Advice on the music Industry from people with experience Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 31st December 2010
  #1
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Advice on the music Industry from people with experience

I open this thread because I think we can all benefit from people who really are pros with some experience on their back and they can offer their thoughts on the industry , the way one has to work to make money out of music and gain respect from his audiance.

If you are this kind of person, and you are not feeling comfortable opening a new thread and posting your opinion, use my thread as an excuse to share your experience and offer your advice. You can talk here for anything you like , is bothering and interests you as long is music releated .

Does not matter what type of musician you are and what type of music you make, sharing experience can benefit any of us.

If you are not this kind of person, you can still post your questions to those poeple and invite them to join the discussion in this thread.

Please support this thread because I think it really deserve to be long enough to be a sticky.

Thanks on advance.

Following this is a post by the forum member gongbass

"

I'm lucky in that I've been able to make a living in the music biz for the last 10 or so years (I'm 36). I'm not a name many would recognize however I've composed hundreds of jingles and scored lots of TV/docs, etc... As a session drummer I've again played on hundreds of recordings, from "ghost drumming" on major label releases, sideman on hundreds of indie, grassroots, soundtrack releases.

I was a "staff composer" with a private boutique music production house in NYC from 2001-2006. It was the greatest job I've ever had. Comfortable weekly paycheck, work from my home studio and "comfortable" deadlines. Learned so much in terms of what works and what doesn't scoring to picture. Also learned the ropes as to how you deal with the creative team of an advertising campaign or producer/director of a show you are doing music and cues for.

Eventually I left that job for the horrendously difficult world of freelance. There are many that make their living this way (and as a session drummer I guess I do still freelance) but its a hard road. After a few years of that I became a partner in a start up music licensing/custom music company (FlikTrax Home - Premier Production Music Licensing -). We have a vast online library that is constantly updated and "meta tagged" as well as a team of in house composers to handle any custom scores, jingles or sound alikes that come in. We built the company the right way and have had surprising success with the current state of the industry. That being said its a "sh!tload of work", we want to do right by and for our artists so we are constantly marketing ourselves. We do as many industry conferences as possible, we meet with respected industry supervisors and network producers but happily deal with local advertising companies for local ads as well as independent film makers.

I've learned more than I'd ever thought I'd know about this business and for better or worse this industry will be what I do for the rest of my life. I continue to gig a bit, teach and as I mentioned do session work as a drummer (mostly from my home studio or Fliktrax's larger facility) but the production music and music licensing biz is my life.

When I mentioned artists "giving away" their music I was referring to what so many young composers and songwriters are forced to deal with when trying to get their work heard and licensed. If the composer or artist isn't working with a larger concern and doesn't have representation than they are often if not always faced with "licensing" their tracks for next to nothing or at best "copy and credit". On one hand I know that every artist needs to build their resume and get experience. Trust me I've done my share of freebees but whats happening now is production budgets are getting slashed and that means little $ for music. Especially original, non "library" tracks. On the other hand, the more musicians give away their tracks and services for free, the more those that used to pay for it, will expect it for free.

The market is saturated with young composers, some are talented folks that don't have any "real" musical education or experience. Many create amazing tracks in their home studio and these tracks get used in certain niche areas of media. Electronica (that's covering a lot of bases for the sake of not breaking into genres) is still a huge style that gets "bought" for TV/Film/Ads.
However once "in the industry" many of these composers learn that if they can't expand they don't get that much work. So they are still trying to pitch to the same markets as the veterans but when an ad guy says "actually we're scrapping the BT (used to be Moby) sound-alike and we want to go in a Americana, rootsy direction... oh and we need it tomorrow at 3. Make sure you hit :23 when the girl smiles and your reverb tale has to be out at exactly :29.5" I know a handful of DJ type composers that are crazy talented but have gotten dropped form ad companies rosters because they can't meet the technical demands.

I went to music school and after I graduated took a few classes on SMPTe and locking music to picture. Those classes helped but its really work experience and learning to pick up on the most ambiguous and esoteric requests from those on the visual side of the project. We are lucky as a company that we have a few experienced guys ready to go at a moments notice. We literally can get a call at 2am from a producer that needs a :60 to
become a :45 and "change the drum n bass loop to a Indian Tabla thing" and have it ready by lunch. That is my big advice to anyone that wants to get into this business. Be good and be fast. If you are lucky enough to work on a full length film or documentary than you get to enjoy a much more relaxed creative pace. The director will "spot" the film with you and you can bounce ideas off them as you write. However the "film" industry is an extrememly difficult one to break into. I haven't in terms of ever scoring a major hollywood release but I've been fortunate enough to work in almost every other area.

"
Old 31st December 2010
  #2
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Tarkovsky's Avatar
 

Thanks for this, it's very interesting and informative to an industry outsider.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #3
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Beermaster's Avatar
 

Interesting post Kilon - I agree with most of what he says coming from the Media Composer background.

The reason I waffle on about people learning as much about music as possible is because to survive as a writer in the media the only way you'll make a 'stable' income is by taking on all and any work that is offered to you no matter what type of music and not matter what tight deadline comes with it... this means that you need to know your dub step from the DnB, your Cajun from your Country, your Telemann from your Bach, your Williams from your Zimmer and your light limiting for orchestral and your side chained pumping compression for your EDM.

Advice aside from the obvious technical issues is also important so here are some thoughts from my experience in the last 20 years as a freelance composer:

1. Networking is the key to getting work. - This can be at it's simplest online communities but to be honest finding groups of people in the industry whether they be music based, film based, Production based, advertising ... getting your face around and meeting people on the social side be it for beers and giggles or talks and seminars - getting your face around to the people that counts is the best form of PR.

2. Learn to disconnect from your emotional attachment of the music you write and submit - More often than not I'm asked to change sections of tracks for the sake of the ego of the Director or Producer in question .. often these sections are the best bits of the tracks and more often than not the Directors don't know what they're talking about.

3. Learn to be patient and obliging to the people that count ... the industry doesn't have time for prima donnas and hero's in their own lunch times - if you can make a good impression as nice guy to work with then your reputation will spread.... If you can entertain your clients and have a good old laugh too so much the better !

4. Learn to roll with the punches and get straight up when hit. Many more of your tracks will be rejected than accepted, this doesn't mean that the tracks are **** it means that they were not right for that particulars situation. ( Ie, the Director's Brother-in-law has been given the gig... or the the decision involved multiple people so you just missed it ... or the goddam director doesn't have a ****ing clue ! ! ) - Believe in your own abilities and don't take it to a personal level - keep in contact with the companies that rejected you and bug them for other gigs and let them know what you're up to.

5. Try to get clients to come to the 'mix' at your studio ( even if it's just for show as you've already done the 99% of the final mix ) - if you can mute a couple of layers and implant the idea in their heads that they have had some sort of input in the track ( even tho you'd already added those layers before hand ! ) then that is another way do sign off on gigs ... nothing clients like better than to be able to say to their friends...." yeah that shaker line was my idea.... it just make's the track buzz ! "

6. Always be upbeat and happy and always be 'busy' when asked - even if you're not make up any **** about re-mixing X and working with X on whatever.

7. Listen everything you can all the time...
Old 3rd January 2011
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
peachboy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
5. Try to get clients to come to the 'mix' at your studio ( even if it's just for show as you've already done the 99% of the final mix ) - if you can mute a couple of layers and implant the idea in their heads that they have had some sort of input in the track ( even tho you'd already added those layers before hand ! ) then that is another way do sign off on gigs ... nothing clients like better than to be able to say to their friends...." yeah that shaker line was my idea.... it just make's the track buzz ! "
Ingenious!! I'm going to definitely try that one.
Old 5th January 2011
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
MRose's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
Interesting post Kilon - I agree with most of what he says coming from the Media Composer background.

The reason I waffle on about people learning as much about music as possible is because to survive as a writer in the media the only way you'll make a 'stable' income is by taking on all and any work that is offered to you no matter what type of music and not matter what tight deadline comes with it... this means that you need to know your dub step from the DnB, your Cajun from your Country, your Telemann from your Bach, your Williams from your Zimmer and your light limiting for orchestral and your side chained pumping compression for your EDM.

Advice aside from the obvious technical issues is also important so here are some thoughts from my experience in the last 20 years as a freelance composer:

1. Networking is the key to getting work. - This can be at it's simplest online communities but to be honest finding groups of people in the industry whether they be music based, film based, Production based, advertising ... getting your face around and meeting people on the social side be it for beers and giggles or talks and seminars - getting your face around to the people that counts is the best form of PR.

2. Learn to disconnect from your emotional attachment of the music you write and submit - More often than not I'm asked to change sections of tracks for the sake of the ego of the Director or Producer in question .. often these sections are the best bits of the tracks and more often than not the Directors don't know what they're talking about.

3. Learn to be patient and obliging to the people that count ... the industry doesn't have time for prima donnas and hero's in their own lunch times - if you can make a good impression as nice guy to work with then your reputation will spread.... If you can entertain your clients and have a good old laugh too so much the better !

4. Learn to roll with the punches and get straight up when hit. Many more of your tracks will be rejected than accepted, this doesn't mean that the tracks are **** it means that they were not right for that particulars situation. ( Ie, the Director's Brother-in-law has been given the gig... or the the decision involved multiple people so you just missed it ... or the goddam director doesn't have a ****ing clue ! ! ) - Believe in your own abilities and don't take it to a personal level - keep in contact with the companies that rejected you and bug them for other gigs and let them know what you're up to.

5. Try to get clients to come to the 'mix' at your studio ( even if it's just for show as you've already done the 99% of the final mix ) - if you can mute a couple of layers and implant the idea in their heads that they have had some sort of input in the track ( even tho you'd already added those layers before hand ! ) then that is another way do sign off on gigs ... nothing clients like better than to be able to say to their friends...." yeah that shaker line was my idea.... it just make's the track buzz ! "

6. Always be upbeat and happy and always be 'busy' when asked - even if you're not make up any **** about re-mixing X and working with X on whatever.

7. Listen everything you can all the time...
Pretty bang on! :-)
I write for TV, advertizing, soundtracks catalogue, and these are very good guidelines! #5 is good advice, not always possible when clients are from other states, but it helps building a relationship with the client and gives them a better insight of what's really going on into the making of a musical piece; plus, as mentionned, if they think they've had some sort of input, you totally scored! (no pun intented) :-)

On a more personal level, it's more dificult for me to be active on the social scene and network considering there really isn't one in Northern VA, sure is no LA. So I'm still very much hunting down the next gig while working on a current project.
Old 6th January 2011
  #6
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by peachboy View Post
Ingenious!! I'm going to definitely try that one.
Like the DFA section on certain large consoles?
Old 6th January 2011
  #7
Gear Head
 
The Digital E-Mu's Avatar
 

This is a wonderful post, thanks so much!

I'm currently studying Audio engineering and writing my own music but I have really just started the course so I'm not too sure where it's going to take me. Any advice for an 18 year old just trying to get into this field? I'm doing really great in the course and love every minute of it, I know I'm in the right place!
Old 6th January 2011
  #8
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The MPCist's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kilon View Post
Be good and be fast.
"
Amen!
Old 6th January 2011
  #9
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Beermaster's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Digital E-Mu View Post
This is a wonderful post, thanks so much!
Any advice for an 18 year old just trying to get into this field? I'm doing really great in the course and love every minute of it, I know I'm in the right place!
As well as trying to impress the people further up the food chain ( ie the older more experienced people who make decisions and call the shots ) ... get in with the people around your age and doing their own thing as they may well be the future directors, producers and agency kings. Do the favors, have fun and make the bonds that can and will make bigger things possible in the future.

Good Luck !

Beer.
Old 7th January 2011
  #10
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The Digital E-Mu's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
As well as trying to impress the people further up the food chain ( ie the older more experienced people who make decisions and call the shots ) ... get in with the people around your age and doing their own thing as they may well be the future directors, producers and agency kings. Do the favors, have fun and make the bonds that can and will make bigger things possible in the future.

Good Luck !

Beer.
Thanks for the advice! I always try to be nice to everyone, my Digital Music production teacher said I was miles ahead of the rest of the class, I love that one!
Old 9th January 2011
  #11
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
Interesting
5. Try to get clients to come to the 'mix' at your studio ( even if it's just for show as you've already done the 99% of the final mix ) - if you can mute a couple of layers and implant the idea in their heads that they have had some sort of input in the track ( even tho you'd already added those layers before hand ! ) then that is another way do sign off on gigs ... nothing clients like better than to be able to say to their friends...." yeah that shaker line was my idea.... it just make's the track buzz ! "
Great points but this one got me thinking.

Couldn't this backfire on you because of people claiming they were "part" of the record?
Old 10th January 2011
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post

2. Learn to disconnect from your emotional attachment of the music you write and submit - More often than not I'm asked to change sections of tracks for the sake of the ego of the Director or Producer in question .. often these sections are the best bits of the tracks and more often than not the Directors don't know what they're talking about.
I can totally relate to that, happens all the time, but I've learned how to trick the egomaniacs and avoid pointless revision work as much as possible. Like you said, it's only an ego trip, and all they want is that you acknowledge they were right (even if they have no frakking idea what they're talking about...) So, make your changes as minimal as possible (just tweak the tempo, the instrumentation, the effects and the overall mix), don't spend much time on that, but tell them that you slaved countless hours on the revised demo. Most of the time, they'll be satisfied and OK your work.
Old 10th January 2011
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Greenway View Post
Great points but this one got me thinking.

Couldn't this backfire on you because of people claiming they were "part" of the record?
Naa, I'm only talking about simple basic ideas like ' Hey what do you think about adding a french horn ?' or ' We could add some shakers here... but I'm not sure..... what do you think?' - nothing as deep as them coming up with melody lines... just simple stuff that makes them feel like they're a part of the production process... It's all mind games really but It REALLY helps to get the client on your side.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaPi61 View Post
I can totally relate to that, happens all the time, but I've learned how to trick the egomaniacs and avoid pointless revision work as much as possible. Like you said, it's only an ego trip, and all they want is that you acknowledge they were right (even if they have no frakking idea what they're talking about...) So, make your changes as minimal as possible (just tweak the tempo, the instrumentation, the effects and the overall mix), don't spend much time on that, but tell them that you slaved countless hours on the revised demo. Most of the time, they'll be satisfied and OK your work.
I recently went through two months of jumping through hoops whilst pitching for a new US tv series, they played all the tricks in the book from agreeing one moment that Mix 3 was working for them.... then calling me on a Sunday Afternoon requesting a big change for Monday Morning...... ... But they did end up admitting that this was all part of a test to see how well I coped with the pressure and strain... it had nothing to do with them needing the changes. ( this was a 26 x half hour show with wall to wall music on each show and a fast turn around......... and even after all this... I didn't get the gig at the end of it ! )
Old 11th January 2011
  #14
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kilon's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
I recently went through two months of jumping through hoops whilst pitching for a new US tv series, they played all the tricks in the book from agreeing one moment that Mix 3 was working for them.... then calling me on a Sunday Afternoon requesting a big change for Monday Morning...... ... But they did end up admitting that this was all part of a test to see how well I coped with the pressure and strain... it had nothing to do with them needing the changes. ( this was a 26 x half hour show with wall to wall music on each show and a fast turn around......... and even after all this... I didn't get the gig at the end of it ! )
WTF???!!!!

Man I admire your patience , thats plain rude. They "admitted that they were just testing you !!!" , seriously.... WTF? I would be seriously pissed. Is that an one in a million incident , or does disrespect go with the profession ?
Old 12th January 2011
  #15
Gear Addict
 

I have scored many TV ads and have done a number of short films and scored a feature.

I agree with most of what Beer said, but have specialised in one sort of area and this has served me well.

Clients come to ME because they know what I do and are confident that they will have the brief delivered that they specked.

I havent done much drama or TV shows thou, so there expectations might be different in this area and require many different musical styles.

Another point to remember is that you get forgotten very quickly.

I took a few years out of sound to picture work and set up an electronic band. It was great we toured all around the world and had some success, but it was very hard to get back into media work. It was almost like starting again.

Luckily things have worked out and I managed to crack it again, But be warned don't take your foot of the accelerator and keep FOCUSED.
Old 14th January 2011
  #16
Gear Maniac
 

My understanding of this music for ads business was that the work was allways through production library companies etc. What other ways is there to go round it if your not giving your music to music library companies.

Also are there any particular libraries that are better than others or some that are better for starting out than others?
Old 14th January 2011
  #17
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dan p's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
Interesting post Kilon - I agree with most of what he says coming from the Media Composer background.

The reason I waffle on about people learning as much about music as possible is because to survive as a writer in the media the only way you'll make a 'stable' income is by taking on all and any work that is offered to you no matter what type of music and not matter what tight deadline comes with it... this means that you need to know your dub step from the DnB, your Cajun from your Country, your Telemann from your Bach, your Williams from your Zimmer and your light limiting for orchestral and your side chained pumping compression for your EDM.

Advice aside from the obvious technical issues is also important so here are some thoughts from my experience in the last 20 years as a freelance composer:

1. Networking is the key to getting work. - This can be at it's simplest online communities but to be honest finding groups of people in the industry whether they be music based, film based, Production based, advertising ... getting your face around and meeting people on the social side be it for beers and giggles or talks and seminars - getting your face around to the people that counts is the best form of PR.

2. Learn to disconnect from your emotional attachment of the music you write and submit - More often than not I'm asked to change sections of tracks for the sake of the ego of the Director or Producer in question .. often these sections are the best bits of the tracks and more often than not the Directors don't know what they're talking about.

3. Learn to be patient and obliging to the people that count ... the industry doesn't have time for prima donnas and hero's in their own lunch times - if you can make a good impression as nice guy to work with then your reputation will spread.... If you can entertain your clients and have a good old laugh too so much the better !

4. Learn to roll with the punches and get straight up when hit. Many more of your tracks will be rejected than accepted, this doesn't mean that the tracks are **** it means that they were not right for that particulars situation. ( Ie, the Director's Brother-in-law has been given the gig... or the the decision involved multiple people so you just missed it ... or the goddam director doesn't have a ****ing clue ! ! ) - Believe in your own abilities and don't take it to a personal level - keep in contact with the companies that rejected you and bug them for other gigs and let them know what you're up to.

5. Try to get clients to come to the 'mix' at your studio ( even if it's just for show as you've already done the 99% of the final mix ) - if you can mute a couple of layers and implant the idea in their heads that they have had some sort of input in the track ( even tho you'd already added those layers before hand ! ) then that is another way do sign off on gigs ... nothing clients like better than to be able to say to their friends...." yeah that shaker line was my idea.... it just make's the track buzz ! "

6. Always be upbeat and happy and always be 'busy' when asked - even if you're not make up any **** about re-mixing X and working with X on whatever.

7. Listen everything you can all the time...
Great post Beers and I have been through every scenario you mention.
Can't say enough about personal relationships.
As for rejection you got to have a stiff upper lip.In most cases when you are working for suits they generally are'nt sure what they want but they can be manipulated into thinking they like what they are hearing with some smooth confident descriptions and you are in the drivers seat.
A few good hits to picture and capturing the emotion of the project help a great deal.
When I'm composing instrumental music I let the video be my lead singer so to speak that way I'm always complementing what you are seeing without getting in the way.Easier said than done.
If you have a versatile backround, have played a lot of different music,know the technology and have a command of your axe this certainly helps and is needed if you want to play this game.

Dan P
Old 18th January 2011
  #18
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kilon View Post
I was a "staff composer" with a private boutique music production house in NYC from 2001-2006. It was the greatest job I've ever had. Comfortable weekly paycheck, work from my home studio and "comfortable" deadlines. Learned so much in terms of what works and what doesn't scoring to picture. Also learned the ropes as to how you deal with the creative team of an advertising campaign or producer/director of a show you are doing music and cues for.

"
Kilon-
what house was it?
I'm a 10 year vet currently doing freelance ad/tv work looking for something steady in that world. trying to gather names of production houses...

cheers!
Old 18th January 2011
  #19
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kilon's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbar View Post
Kilon-
what house was it?
I'm a 10 year vet currently doing freelance ad/tv work looking for something steady in that world. trying to gather names of production houses...

cheers!
this is not my post, so you will have ask the OP. I mention his nick in my first post.
Old 2nd June 2011
  #20
Gear Nut
 
Slash Asterisk's Avatar
 

Ill add my two cents from being an experienced post mixer. The clien tis always right, if you want to do things your own way do them on your own time on your own projects. You are only there to make their dreams come true. Be friendly and prompt and compliment their project .
Old 2nd June 2011
  #21
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AlexDaCat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slash Asterisk View Post
Ill add my two cents from being an experienced post mixer. The clien tis always right, if you want to do things your own way do them on your own time on your own projects. You are only there to make their dreams come true. Be friendly and prompt and compliment their project .
Old 2nd June 2011
  #22
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AlexDaCat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dan p View Post
Great post Beers and I have been through every scenario you mention.
Can't say enough about personal relationships.
As for rejection you got to have a stiff upper lip.In most cases when you are working for suits they generally are'nt sure what they want but they can be manipulated into thinking they like what they are hearing with some smooth confident descriptions and you are in the drivers seat.
A few good hits to picture and capturing the emotion of the project help a great deal.
When I'm composing instrumental music I let the video be my lead singer so to speak that way I'm always complementing what you are seeing without getting in the way.Easier said than done.
If you have a versatile backround, have played a lot of different music,know the technology and have a command of your axe this certainly helps and is needed if you want to play this game.

Dan P
Old 2nd June 2011
  #23
Lives for gear
 

What a really valuable thread. Thank you.
Old 13th January 2012
  #24
Gear Nut
 
JoeyXoto's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
Naa, I'm only talking about simple basic ideas like ' Hey what do you think about adding a french horn ?' or ' We could add some shakers here... but I'm not sure..... what do you think?' - nothing as deep as them coming up with melody lines... just simple stuff that makes them feel like they're a part of the production process... It's all mind games really but It REALLY helps to get the client on your side.



I recently went through two months of jumping through hoops whilst pitching for a new US tv series, they played all the tricks in the book from agreeing one moment that Mix 3 was working for them.... then calling me on a Sunday Afternoon requesting a big change for Monday Morning...... ... But they did end up admitting that this was all part of a test to see how well I coped with the pressure and strain... it had nothing to do with them needing the changes. ( this was a 26 x half hour show with wall to wall music on each show and a fast turn around......... and even after all this... I didn't get the gig at the end of it ! )
This inspires me. Your a legend in my books.
Old 13th January 2012
  #25
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JoeyXoto's Avatar
 

This is the best thread on Gearslutz! +1
Old 13th January 2012
  #26
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I do some side work in TV, not enough to live on but keeps me in synthsheh

Imo, the best way to get your stuff on TV (actual shows, not commercials--which I would love to hear about how that's done), is to contact music supervisors directly. These are the people whose job is to meet all the musical needs of the shows producers.

They don't make the final call, the producers do, but it's the next best thing. When sending a demo, don't just send random stuff; send stuff that they could actually use on their current shows. That means, watching the shows contacting the supervisors. Then, you can write a short cover letter stating why you feel your music works for their shows. The sups are much more likely to listen to your stuff.

And by skipping the the publishing houses, you cut out the middle man and keep more money for yourself! They claim they can get your fees higher, but I am skeptical. I suppose it's possible, but what can they say if the artist isn't already established? These TV shows have budgets and I don't see why they would pay more than they had to for an unknown artist.
Old 13th January 2012
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
to survive as a writer in the media the only way you'll make a 'stable' income is by taking on all and any work that is offered to you no matter what type of music and not matter what tight deadline comes with it.
This is certainly true, and holds for other freelance work too, even outside the arts. I earn my money through IT project work and technical translations () and the only way I can guarantee I make a living out of it is if I always take on projects that are offered to me.

What this does is it kind of pushes you further up the ranks in terms of which guy they're gonna call when they need someone.
Old 13th January 2012
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post

2. Learn to disconnect from your emotional attachment of the music you write and submit - More often than not I'm asked to change sections of tracks for the sake of the ego of the Director or Producer in question .. often these sections are the best bits of the tracks and more often than not the Directors don't know what they're talking about.
Very important. Sometimes difficult. But at the end of the day, they know what they want or don't want in terms of how it meshes with their vision. Sometimes you can make a case as to why you disagree ( a small sales pitch), but at some point, that becomes in some ways a challenge to their license and expertise which you really want to avoid in the process.
Old 13th January 2012
  #29
Can only echo Beermaster's comments - I've had the same issues with "clients" testing me!
As a producer for the UK-based Reggae group UB40, I started as a wet-behind-the-ears assistant engineer (with a degree qual) and worked (very hard) up to Producer - the sole bit if advice I can offer to any new people, albeit from a studio perspective, is.......


learn some humility. Even if you think you (and maybe) are the next best thing, paying clients wont thank you for voicing your opinions. There is a time and a place. Secondly, NO job is beneath you, even if it's (in your opinion) menial......


The aspects with mixing are true, I was told a wise phrase that has stuck with me all the time -

"the fine art of diplomacy is telling somebody to "fcuk off" is such a subtle way that they actually look forward to the journey....."

The tech aspect of the Music business, and in all fairness the Music, is a minor percentage of the business. The irony is that it is all about money. Nothing else.
Harsh but imho true.

So creatively, if you're writing to make it big - be true to yourself and ENJOY it (if you don't, how can you expect others to?)

No doubt there will be other great advice from others too......

Keep em coming!

Dan
Old 14th January 2012
  #30
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post

1. Networking is the key to getting work. - This can be at it's simplest online communities but to be honest finding groups of people in the industry whether they be music based, film based, Production based, advertising ... getting your face around and meeting people on the social side be it for beers and giggles or talks and seminars - getting your face around to the people that counts is the best form of PR.
Yep, from what I've seen here many people seem to think they can skip the face to face/in person part, little do they know that there are many people moving cities or even countries to get closer to the action. These are the people who eventualy make a sucsess of themselves. You can't change the world sitting in your house sending facebook pm's to record labels.
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