The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Synths for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Help someone completely new to electronic music production. Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 26th December 2010
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Help someone completely new to electronic music production.

Hey everyone, this is my first post and I apologize for the length and healthy amount of n00b content you'll be forced to take in. I'd be greatly appreciative of any help that you could send my way.

I'm a guitar player of 10 years, completely self taught and for the entire time I've been totally fascinated by the art and science that goes behind making music from completely electronic platforms. It has always been something I've been wanting to dive into and now that I am slowly beginning to build my studio (and my business) I think it'll be the perfect time to take the plunge.

I'm somewhat familiar with the way things work. My band performs live with backing tracks, littered with strings, synths, bass drops, and all the sorts of ear candy listeners go crazy for these days. It's a tight production we adhere to with a pretty intricate in-ear set up while we all run individual click tracks; but I want to know and learn HOW it was created. As someone who only understands music as coming from the instruments I actually play I continue to find myself totally BAFFLED by what electronic artists do.

lol if you aren't already slapping your foreheads, shielding your brains from n00b radiation then feel free to read on (:

My question is; Where would be a good place to start? I've messed around with Ableton Live 8 a tiny bit and I'm really drawn to the user friendly layout as well as the plethora of hardware options readily available for live performance. I'm not typically limiting myself either, I'm interested in creating everything from subtle ambient passages for live transitions, to full on dance productions. Any books, courses, or websites that you would recommend? What sort of hardware and software should I begin investing in?

I'm open to any advice you could send my way. I'm a totally blank canvas when it comes to this stuff lol. In addition to the tremendous amount of respect I have for IDM artists and producers as well as DJs I also just really enjoy the music and would love to learn how to make it and incorporate these elements into what I do already. Thanks for reading (:
Old 26th December 2010
  #2
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
The first things would be:
- monitor speakers
- controller keyboard
- audio interface

since you're going to need those most likely anyway, if only to record your work.

But give us more info. What is your budget? What do you want to plug in? What kind of computer do you have? What do you already own? Which artists do you admire?
Old 26th December 2010
  #3
Here for the gear
 

As far as monitors go I've got some pretty basic ones but I'm looking to upgrade to a pair of Adams or JBLs, I'd still like to demo a few before making a purchase. As far as budget goes, it's pretty generous, due to an unfortunate circumstance, I'd like to make smart investments while avoiding the tendency to splurge.

I have a macbook right now, it's pretty old so I'll be getting a new one next month, I'd like to keep things portable for now. Still debating on which one but even the base model does pretty well for the MIDI intense stuff(According to my research). Now when you're referring to keyboard controllers which one would you recommend?

I love listening to a lot of the earlier, more dissonant "glitch" artists. I love Autechre and we've got Phoenecia coming out of my hometown of Miami. I know that stuff can be pretty dissonant and boring for most people lol. It's just an approach I love listening to. It wasn't until I watched the Moog documentary in high school that my eyes really opened up. I got REALLY into Jimmy Tamborello (like every other band kid) after hearing his stuff with Postal Service.

I'm obsessed with Adam young's work. I'm a little disappointed that Owl City gets all the praise when his true genius can be observed in his Ambient/Instrumental work like Port Blue, Insect Airport, and Dolphin Park. I'll also admit to falling into the whole club music phase, guys like Armin van Buuren. Even the house stuff, people bash him but I think Zimmerman is great even after "blowing up" recently. On that note it's funny to see this whole "Skrillex" craze now lol our bands played together waaaay back, but I dig his stuff too.

Even with all my interest I still consider myself pretty ignorant and I've got a lot to learn an understand. I'm more of a "mic up the drumset and play your guitar" kind of guy!
Old 26th December 2010
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Here is the most honest answer I can give you.

Ten years guitar under your belt is pretty good but if you want to get into electronic music production and do it well. learn to play piano and drums really well.
Old 26th December 2010
  #5
Here for the gear
 

Totally agree with you. I practice piano every day, and drums were actually my first instrument. By no means am I a virtuoso in any of the two areas, but I definitely have a decent grasp on those rhythmic and harmonic elements. I force myself to learn something new every day and I'm pretty eager to continue adding to my bag of tools, tricks, and skills. I think that's really the best way for musicians to grow, which is really my main focus in all of this.

Touring the country and playing the heck out of guitar strings is cool and all, but there are plenty other worlds I'd like to explore.
Old 26th December 2010
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
findletron's Avatar
 

I will probablly take some heat from this but have you considered something like sonic academy?

its a tutorial video website for mostly ableton live with a dance music slant. They basically start off with a finished tune, and deconstruct the.. er, 'construction' (hah) of said tune bit by bit.

A lot of it is aimed at beginners, but theres some great info there for all skill levels. I was deeply into it when I was converging over to ableton live from logic, and although I have a lot of robot-music experience from years past, and a lot of the info was basic stuff, I picked up a lot of tips and tricks and little things I wouldnt have thought about without watching someone else approach it.

Its always nice to see how someone else gets 'there', ya know? Even if the example tunes arent your style (theyre not mine ) stll very interesting, and if your gonna watch a video on the internet, why not an ableton instruction vs a cute puppy video

On the plus side, You should allready be loads better than most EDM producers with your guitar background!

good luck,

/s
Old 26th December 2010
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Help someone completely new to electronic music production.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy
Here is the most honest answer I can give you.

Ten years guitar under your belt is pretty good but if you want to get into electronic music production and do it well. learn to play piano and drums really well.
Or get a midi guitar.

In his RBMA video, Pepe Bradock talked about how he sampled a small bit of a vocal to make a lead sound he played on midi guitar in his amazing "mouth" remix. Piano is great but guitar gives you a different perspective and could be a unique advantage to someone new.

I'd say learn how to record, cut things up, and mix them well together. The fun part about electronic music is it has less limitations than playing a traditional instrument live so take advantage of that, think about the sound you want to create and work on trying to get there. You will make 10 new sounds in the process. If you like glitch maybe look into max/msp or reaktor or browse the freeware vsts on sites like kvraudio.
Old 26th December 2010
  #8
Here for the gear
 

findletron, I've definitely stumbled upon the videos from sonic academy. I'll have to look into the site and the loads of content I can download. I agree those vids can be really useful, I've been immersed in tutorial vids on youtube for the passed month now! Like any sort of engineering nothing beats sitting in the room with the engineer/producer and studying his or her every move. Cyrus from New Found Glory is producing my band's next record so I'm gonna have oodles of fun bugging the heck out of him and learning everything I can.

We also have the SAE institute in Miami which offers software specific classes. Some guys usually toss out the idea of formal classes, but I think they can be a great investment if you head to the right place. And jessem; I've heard of reaktor and would love to look into it. A MIDI guitar would be pretty sick. Heck I'm probably gonna be breaking a bunch of rules while I'm learning this stuff. I might as well make something of it!
Old 26th December 2010
  #9
Gear Nut
 

I would say the midi guitar is a damn fine idea. You can't go wrong with ableton and perhaps an investment in NI Komplete would be good as you'd have guitar rig plus reaktor, massive and fm8. Throw in a midi guitar for control and
Old 26th December 2010
  #10
Lives for gear
 

If you have 10 years of guitar experience you may be able to trade session time with local electronic musicians, or maybe some regional ones when you are on tour. Maybe play some parts for them in exchange for walking through their gear, workflow and arrangement process. I always learn a lot when working with other people.

Also worth mentioning, there are some great magazines worth checking out. The future music/computer music series and Sound on Sound. Many people may not like their bubblegum nature (especially the future music) but if you stay objective while reading them you can learn a lot. They also come with some great studio interviews from popular artists (which can be found on sites like youtube and google video).

I also have Native Instruments Maschine and I really like it for ease of use. When I'm working with friends who don't have a lot of experience doing things in a DAW I will load up sounds for the project on Maschine and let them "jam" out while I play synths, record it, and edit it together. It's very tactile and easy to get into so it might be worth demoing and picking up if you like it, especially at such a low price point.
Old 27th December 2010
  #11
Here for the gear
 

Help someone completely new to electronic music production.

Coooool thanks for all the input guys. Hopefully I can add some stuff and get it all up and running soon. Honestly the first task will probably be constructing some basic backing tracks for my band to play to live. Basic synth layers and string accents and stuff.

If you don't mind me asking, how did most of you start out? And this may sound ignorant but it's something I've been wondering since the recent surge of popularity in house/dubstep and EDM in general. As a guitar player it just confuses me sometimes. What's to stop these "DJ" guys from creating these tracks full of live sounding mash-ups and sonic manipulations at home and simply pressing "play" on an iPod and faking all the cool, twisty, nobby stuff live and dancing around?
Old 27th December 2010
  #12
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
Quote:
What's to stop these "DJ" guys from creating these tracks full of live sounding mash-ups and sonic manipulations at home and simply pressing "play" on an iPod and faking all the cool, twisty, nobby stuff live and dancing around?
Nothing. But you can't know this for sure with anything unless you know what they should be doing and you don't see it matching up with what you hear. Guitar and drums are harder to fake. heh

As for starting, that's a question worthy of its own topic - so feel free to start it
Old 27th December 2010
  #13
Lives for gear
 
filipv's Avatar
U must go to a lot of techno-mechno parties, only that way you will know which direction to take as a producer. The part after 2 or 3 am is especially revealing.

If you never party, u can never make good dance music.
Old 27th December 2010
  #14
Lives for gear
 
AcoosticZoo's Avatar
Animal vs Robots.

Thanks for your question. Seriously refreshing to see someone from a solid musical background have an interest in Producing EDM.

There's two opposing goals to make your music a force to be reckoned with.

With Real instruments - your goal is to make it sound tight and groove with emotion.

With Electro Programmed synths - Your goal is to make feel loose and organic with feel and emotion.

The trick is:- How do you make a sterile artificial OSC into something that breathes with interest and life? There lies the challenge that will take you many hours of experimentation, trial and error to develop your own style. One tip is to be original and go with you inner ears.

If you take a listen to vengeance demos, imho, he is really at the top of the EDM genre - Phat, engaging productions that sounds very Organic and Interesting to my ears - vengeance is nevertheless is just one example out of a sea of very talent EDM producers out there.

EDM is similar to how you'd compose acoustic songs in that you still need to have a solid idea/hook to start off with.

Personally, I find it much harder to make EDM sound organic and breath when compared to traditional instrument based productions.

Actually, contrary to some real musicians beliefs - EDM done well takes a life time of learning and skill to produce stella results.

The best thing about EDM, once you really get into it, is that it has to boundaries or rules, you're free to do almost anything and everything.

2nd tip, Sketch with simple ideas and build, don't critique your ideas too early. Build upon little ideas, keep layering and arranging your song till you start feeling the message/hook taking shape. Don't forget to take breaks and come back with fresh ears.

3rd tip, Get the right sounds to start of with. Sound design is 90% of the impact when doing EDM (ie. the right sound can make and elevate your track to a world wide cult status).

Good luck with it.


Regards
Josef Horhay
Mixing Engineer
www.acoosticzoo.com
Old 27th December 2010
  #15
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by filipv View Post
U must go to a lot of techno-mechno parties, only that way you will know which direction to take as a producer. The part after 2 or 3 am is especially revealing.

If you never party, u can never make good dance music.
Haha I hear ya! Don't worry, I've lived in Miami my whole life and we're a big time dance city. The culture is really dense here and I love the huge ammount of options I have when it comes to dance clubs and what not. We have a lot of independent House DJs here and I spend a lot of time trying to learn and observe.

I've taught myself every instrument I know how to play, simply through observation and dedication, so I'm determined to take every step to get these new tricks under my fingers.

Been messing around with more Ableton by the way, really smooth software, just gotta get myself a set of nice little controllers. Funny how my GAS has moved from Guitar and bass amps to EDM toys heh
Old 27th December 2010
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelThomas View Post
Funny how my GAS has moved from Guitar and bass amps to EDM toys heh

Its a slippery slop mate, watch out or it'll be $5000 compressors next!



.
Old 27th December 2010
  #17
Gear Addict
 
JRock's Avatar
 

I don't know if you are past this already, but learn how to use midi. It's one of the most perplexing, frustrating, but crucial steps to EM. Once you learn it, the rest is up to your creativity. But going from plugging your guitar in and turning the knob to routing which channel is in/out/thru etc... It's different to say the least. Making sounds and music will come naturally to you. Learn the technical stuff first though so you're able to realize your full creative potential.

I apologize if this is insulting and you are already past this, but I came from playing Bass/guitar/keyboard/drum machine on a 4 track, and I struggled with this stuff for a few months. I still prefer hardware to computers. I sequence it all with midi now. (except for the Bass and the Guitar)

The guy at the music store will take advantage of you if you come in and say "what do I need for an electronic setup?"
Old 27th December 2010
  #18
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRock View Post
I don't know if you are past this already, but learn how to use midi. It's one of the most perplexing, frustrating, but crucial steps to EM. Once you learn it, the rest is up to your creativity. But going from plugging your guitar in and turning the knob to routing which channel is in/out/thru etc... It's different to say the least. Making sounds and music will come naturally to you. Learn the technical stuff first though so you're able to realize your full creative potential.

I apologize if this is insulting and you are already past this, but I came from playing Bass/guitar/keyboard/drum machine on a 4 track, and I struggled with this stuff for a few months. I still prefer hardware to computers. I sequence it all with midi now. (except for the Bass and the Guitar)

The guy at the music store will take advantage of you if you come in and say "what do I need for an electronic setup?"
Not insulting at all my friend. The mere idea of MIDI can be a steep learning curve. I understand the basic concepts but I admit things can be overwhelming for a beginner when all you come from is wrestling instruments your whole life. Honestly my best tool right now is my eagerness to learn...and lots of freeware (:

It's funny, a lot of the "rock band" dudes I find myself around usually belittle or insult EDM artists, insisting that it's just a bunch of frat guy, fist pump, mumbo jumbo that's super easy to create and perform. I could never understand that because I always knew this area of musical creation could easily become totally head spinning. I'll never forget being in sixth grade and listening to my music teacher bring up the word "Synthesizer." He'd ask me; "Michael do you like video games? Well all the sounds you hear in there come from a synthesizer!" Man, ever since then I've been completely drawn and curious about the little sounds coming out of my NES.

But hey! The guitar was sexy right?! I was young so I took that up and put programming on hold until now. Should be a fun ride lol.
Old 28th December 2010
  #19
Lives for gear
 
blinky909's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by filipv View Post
If you never party, u can never make good dance music.
this is mostly true. i lost that dance floor sensibility when i stopped going out - 10 years on i'm starting to go out more, and my music is regaining that motion that the dance floor demands.

the best advice i have is to forget gear, forget musical education, and to just seek out music you like and listen to it endlessly and analyze the structure, placement of sounds, everything. deconstruct them and then figure out what you would need to recreate them.

simply buying gear that others use is not going to give you the results you are after if the gear they are using isn't what the stuff you like was done with. you'll never get a DX FM sound out of a Juno 106 or make a DX-7 sound like a Jupiter 8.

gear lust is fun, but if your goal is to write music, leave this forum right now heh
Old 28th December 2010
  #20
Gear Nut
 
Ki-Lab's Avatar
 

To the OP. I am in a similar place, a guitar player for years -- then composed and sang for a synth pop band. Then went back to guitar for years, but in the past year or so am getting back into electronic music.

This is a useful website: TweakHeadz Lab Electronic Musician's Hangout

Also, check out the synthesis tutorials sticky in this forum.

I'd second the poster who recommended mastering Midi. Right now I am working on furthering my understanding of midi and drum programming.

There are no real rules except learn, experiment, and keep learning and experimenting. There is a lot of very useful info on this forum, so you're in a good place.
Old 28th December 2010
  #21
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by blinky909 View Post
this is mostly true. i lost that dance floor sensibility when i stopped going out - 10 years on i'm starting to go out more, and my music is regaining that motion that the dance floor demands.

the best advice i have is to forget gear, forget musical education, and to just seek out music you like and listen to it endlessly and analyze the structure, placement of sounds, everything. deconstruct them and then figure out what you would need to recreate them.

simply buying gear that others use is not going to give you the results you are after if the gear they are using isn't what the stuff you like was done with. you'll never get a DX FM sound out of a Juno 106 or make a DX-7 sound like a Jupiter 8.

gear lust is fun, but if your goal is to write music, leave this forum right now heh
I'm going to have to disagree but just based on my personal experience. I got into electronic music in Ohio at 15 after being lent "Harry the bastard - club h vol 1". I bought synths and started learning far before I set foot in a club and my taste hasn't changed much. It does help to get an idea of how this type of music sounds on high end systems but really a grooves a groove weather you feel it in your car or with other people at the hottest afterhours warehouse party.
Old 28th December 2010
  #22
Gear Addict
 
Headphones's Avatar
Maybe the best way to get your foot into this would be some sort of guitar MIDI synth, a drum machine, USB midi keyboard, mixer/audio interface, and a laptop with a DAW. (Cubase, Logic, Ableton, FruityLoops, etc). You could perform your guitar parts in real time, have it recorded into audio, then build the song around it (beats, basslines, melodies, etc). You may wish to look into guitar synth pedals (Moogerfoogers, Electro-Harmonix, Digitech, Boss) that will kind of turn your guitar into a synth and if you're enjoying that, you could stick with guitar. But learning how synths work with software would be the route you'd want to take when it comes to learning how synths make/shape sounds before you go out and buy a hardware synth. There are different synths that do different things depending on what they're good at (FM, subtractive, additive, etc), digital/analogue, mono/poly, etc.

Since guitar is your strength, I'd suggest you keep playing it, yet learn more about synths as you're doing it. Not going to promise you'll be a better guitar player, but you should quickly learn what's needed to make electronic music when you grasp MIDI, waveforms (square, saw, pulse, sample/hold, etc), and beats can be handy to know a little about as well. (Unless you have a drummer who can use an electronic drum kit and work with you)...

Good luck...
Old 28th December 2010
  #23
Lives for gear
 
kilon's Avatar
 

Well regarding a previous comment that you will have to learn piano to make electronic music.

The only similarity between a piano and a synthesizer , is that both have black and white keys. End of similarities.

Knowing another instrument , never hurt anyone. Actually thats a lie , it can seriously hurt you if you dont learn to treat your synth as a separate instrument.

Synthesizers are all about the sound, the sound becomes an an extremely important part of performance unlike any other kind of musical instrument out there.

That means that if you really want to learn how a synth works , you will have to learn how a synth works. I dont think that there is a book , or specific course you must take. Synthesizers are freeform by nature , they dont impose styles or paths.

I think a DIY approach works for synth much better than it work for another musical instruments. There is no limit to what you can learn and there is always something new to discover.

If you still look for the best teacher. The best teacher is youtube for me, there some amazing people, doing amazing thing with synth on youtube that worth checking them out.

I learned electronic music through computer music magazine, I have tons of issues I no longer read, maybe if we were close I could loan you some, but if you can get them on a newsagent near you, do so . They are full of tutorials .

They are even offering free pdf tutorials.

Free beginner PDFs | Computer Music Magazine | MusicRadar.com

Of course google is your friend, once I have download almost a 1GB of pdfs about pretty much anything. I ended up using only a few kbs of knowledge.

With synths its not so much how much you know but what you do with the things you know. In the end all it matter is 3 things:

1) Practice

2) Practice

3) and when you are tired , some more practice.

I hope I helped you , you pathetic noob. Your ignorance disgust me... bliah....how you dare come in here and ask questions???? Noob, NOOOOB .... waste of time.... noob... get out of here... did I told you ,that you are


Old 29th December 2010
  #24
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kilon View Post
Well regarding a previous comment that you will have to learn piano to make electronic music.

The only similarity between a piano and a synthesizer , is that both have black and white keys. End of similarities.

Knowing another instrument , never hurt anyone. Actually thats a lie , it can seriously hurt you if you dont learn to treat your synth as a separate instrument.

Synthesizers are all about the sound, the sound becomes an an extremely important part of performance unlike any other kind of musical instrument out there.

That means that if you really want to learn how a synth works , you will have to learn how a synth works. I dont think that there is a book , or specific course you must take. Synthesizers are freeform by nature , they dont impose styles or paths.

I think a DIY approach works for synth much better than it work for another musical instruments. There is no limit to what you can learn and there is always something new to discover.

If you still look for the best teacher. The best teacher is youtube for me, there some amazing people, doing amazing thing with synth on youtube that worth checking them out.

I learned electronic music through computer music magazine, I have tons of issues I no longer read, maybe if we were close I could loan you some, but if you can get them on a newsagent near you, do so . They are full of tutorials .

They are even offering free pdf tutorials.

Free beginner PDFs | Computer Music Magazine | MusicRadar.com

Of course google is your friend, once I have download almost a 1GB of pdfs about pretty much anything. I ended up using only a few kbs of knowledge.

With synths its not so much how much you know but what you do with the things you know. In the end all it matter is 3 things:

1) Practice

2) Practice

3) and when you are tired , some more practice.

I hope I helped you , you pathetic noob. Your ignorance disgust me... bliah....how you dare come in here and ask questions???? Noob, NOOOOB .... waste of time.... noob... get out of here... did I told you ,that you are


Hahaha thanks a lot kilon. I agree, and worry not, I'm not about to go out to buy a bunch of hardware synths. I'm sure I can sustain this venture with a laptop, basic MIDI controller, monitors, and some sort of software (Ableton is the only one that hasn't made my head spin so far.) But many of the other suggested ones seem promising. And thanks for suggesting the magazine, I've learned tons that way.

Aside from that I do agree that in this realm of music you really do need to go out to the dance establishments and listen to how things are being done from time to time. It makes for a better understanding and it's all about keeping up on your toes and listening to what moves people. Same thing happens when I go on tour and get the chance to play with new bands in new cities. I'm lucky enough to have a new job tat has me working at multiple clubs across downtown Miami and south beach in the same night, so I just find myself lost in a drooling daze from time to time trying to mentally tear apart and rip together what I'm hearing with my ears. I call it study time (:

Thanks for the words of encouragement gentlemen.
Old 29th December 2010
  #25
Lives for gear
 

hello michael thomas, i came from a similar background to you - guitarist, (plus some scratch djing and drum machine-ing...).

here are my two bits of advice...

1. you might like Propellerheads Reason. it was very useful for me (and i still use it in conjunction with other software) because it duplicates how real gear works i.e. you visually plug actual devices together with 'cables'. so presuming you are already familiar with guitar stomp boxes and perhaps the basics of a mixing desk, then you will be half way there - just create the sound and effects modules you want and plug them together in whatever order you like. its really like having a studio full of kit. latest version lets you sample straight in and i believe there is a free demo. and although it is much more complicated now than when i started out, i still think it is a comparatively easy way in. it can also get very sophisticated too.

2. the problem with electronic music, unlike guitars (which i love), is that everything comes with a f-king big manual and usually requires you to read most of it. every manufacturer likes to work in slightly different ways and the term 'keep it simple' does not seem to exist in the brains of software developers... so usually stuff does 30% of what you want and 70% of what you don't.

3. i wasn't going to have tip three, but i've just remembered it. its not really a tip, more of a thought. i think i had the most fun when i had one FX unit (yamaha FX500) and a casio MT-60 keyboard and a 4-track tape recorder. a computer was a distant dream. i also would bet that a lot of the sounds i made then were a lot more original than some of the sounds i make now. there is something to be said for making a lot out of a little.

heh
Old 30th December 2010
  #26
Here for the gear
 

lol yep I know what you mean about the manuals. Scary stuff at times -__- but anything can be overcome. I've dabbled with Reason but have yet to make a single sound come out of it lol. Gotta try it out some more.
Old 30th December 2010
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
rockerbruce's Avatar
 

My SG stays idle most of the time since my EDM obession sadly :(
A month ago i was playing some synth lines using audio-to-midi which was fun and the most use its had in a while
Old 30th December 2010
  #28
nice thread.
sticky for now
Old 30th December 2010
  #29
Lives for gear
 

Help someone completely new to electronic music production.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelThomas
lol yep I know what you mean about the manuals. Scary stuff at times -__- but anything can be overcome. I've dabbled with Reason but have yet to make a single sound come out of it lol. Gotta try it out some more.
i would suggest to explore the example tracks that come with it (i assume the demo comes with those). use the TAB key to flip from the front of the rack to 'the back' where you'll see the cables. you'll soon start to see what's going on
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump