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Questions on getting noticed by a label as an artist. Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 15th December 2010
  #1
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Mardi Gras's Avatar
 

Questions on getting noticed by a label as an artist.

Hey slutz,

As the title says I'm wondering what the best way to go about getting recognition from a label?

Is it really just a case of emailing labels with links to your Demo/EP?

I have some songs I would like to send off to be considered, but im also wondering;

how good to the production values have to be?

sound I send my songs to be mastered before sending them to be listened to by a label?

Do labels want electronic artists who can pretty much do the whole engineering side themselves or do they take the basic idea of the song from the artist and get a professional electronic engineer to push the song up to CD standard?

Thanks heh
Old 15th December 2010
  #2
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DarkPlasma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
how good to the production values have to be?
Listen to the releases on on the label your interested in. Compare your track. Does it sound up to par? Ask a couple other people and see what they say.

Quote:
sound I send my songs to be mastered before sending them to be listened to by a label?
Its obviously better to do so, if you can afford quality mastering from a REAL mastering engineer that has a real pro studio. Not some Internet mastering engineer tutt

Quote:
Do labels want electronic artists who can pretty much do the whole engineering side themselves or do they take the basic idea of the song from the artist and get a professional electronic engineer to push the song up to CD standard?

Thanks heh
Thats irrelavent, imo, its all about the quality of your track.

Ive been making music for 3 years, 3 years ago I didnt even know what a synthesizer was. That being said, myself, I am not ready to send out my tracks yet, but once im ready the approach I would take is simple, send it to the djs, and send it to the labels. If your track gets noticed, it will be released, be played live, played on radio mix shows, etc... You will make some money from that, and then hopefully get booked to dj live, and thats easy you dont even need to know how to beat match anymore lol Thats where the real money is.
Old 15th December 2010
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
Hey slutz,

As the title says I'm wondering what the best way to go about getting recognition from a label?

Is it really just a case of emailing labels with links to your Demo/EP?

I have some songs I would like to send off to be considered, but im also wondering;

how good to the production values have to be?

sound I send my songs to be mastered before sending them to be listened to by a label?

Do labels want electronic artists who can pretty much do the whole engineering side themselves or do they take the basic idea of the song from the artist and get a professional electronic engineer to push the song up to CD standard?

Thanks heh
you need:
1) strong music
2) a good live act.

sometimes all you need is one or the other. preferably both. and if you want money you need to gig.
Old 15th December 2010
  #4
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Mardi Gras's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkPlasma View Post
Listen to the releases on on the label your interested in. Compare your track. Does it sound up to par? Ask a couple other people and see what they say.



Its obviously better to do so, if you can afford quality mastering from a REAL mastering engineer that has a real pro studio. Not some Internet mastering engineer tutt



Thats irrelavent, imo, its all about the quality of your track.

Ive been making music for 3 years, 3 years ago I didnt even know what a synthesizer was. That being said, myself, I am not ready to send out my tracks yet, but once im ready the approach I would take is simple, send it to the djs, and send it to the labels. If your track gets noticed, it will be released, be played live, played on radio mix shows, etc... You will make some money from that, and then hopefully get booked to dj live, and thats easy you dont even need to know how to beat match anymore lol Thats where the real money is.
thanks for the replies.

Do labels actually listen to demo's sent to them? I always thought that they wouldn't be interested since they probably think a lot is crap
Old 15th December 2010
  #5
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DarkPlasma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
thanks for the replies.

Do labels actually listen to demo's sent to them? I always thought that they wouldn't be interested since they probably think a lot is crap
Yes, they do. Even though many think they throw the cds in the garbage without even listening, they do, because on one of those cds there is the next hit track. This is especially true in the big commercial labels such as Sony, BMG, EMI, etc...

Its much easier for a label to receive a digital copy today, though. And its better for you since you can keep it @ 24, 48. Instead of 16, 44.1
Old 15th December 2010
  #6
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Acid Mitch's Avatar
 

I have a friend doing a college course and apparently everyone has to start their own net based label to promote themselves.

I guess starting your own is the best way to get noticed
Old 15th December 2010
  #7
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DarkPlasma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acid Mitch View Post
I have a friend doing a college course and apparently everyone has to start their own net based label to promote themselves.

I guess starting your own is the best way to get noticed
For sure, I just think that when it comes to soundcloud, too many people upload their entire track, and once someone listened to the whole track like 5 or 6 times, why would they buy it?

People should upload a 2-minute sample of a track, that is plenty to get interest.
Old 15th December 2010
  #8
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Mardi Gras's Avatar
 

another question

how many songs on the demo? I hear max 3?
Old 15th December 2010
  #9
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ChristianRock's Avatar
 

DarkPlasma: let me understand. You say you've never submitted any songs yet you're giving advice on how to get noticed and how labels work? You're saying the "big guys" will listen to every song that gets into their hands, and that they accept demo uploads from strangers?

I think you need to start every one of your posts in this thread with "Well, in my fantasy world..."

Mardi Gras: This is what you get by asking this type of question in a public forum. You need to get out and promote yourself, not ask for shortcuts to success on the internet.

Here's some better advice to start with. http://blog.discmakers.com/2010/11/a...bel-landscape/
Old 15th December 2010
  #10
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Here are some random sentences in no apparent order:

When I was starting out, I made a list of EVERY record label relevant to my niche genre. I found their contact details & sent them a CD in the post.
From that, I ultimately got two labels interested & that I went on to release my music with.

That was about 3/4 years ago.


Nowadays, I'd say the same thing applies... but look up how the labels prefer to receive demos... some prefer digital, some still like a CD. (they normally state on their website).

If sending digitally, send a download link... don't email them with a 20MB attachment.

Some labels are open to demos, some will not listen to anything that isn't personally recommended to them by a known source.

MAKE SURE THE LABELS YOU TARGET ARE RELEVANT TO YOUR MUSIC.


Above all, the most important thing is to have KILLER music. Once you are established, you may get away with some more mediocre tracks... but your first breakthrough needs to be super-amazing.
I read a comment on here a while ago along the lines of 'if your music makes DJs look good, they will want to play it & your music will get signed'. Simple.


Send your music to pirate radio DJs. Build hype, even if you don't have a deal.

Consider giving your music away free on a net label... then hitting up all the pirate DJs... build hype.


Find out who is in charge of the labels you want to be signed to, go to their gigs, accost them & (politely) force your CD down their throat. Tell them you'll drop them an email to see if they have any feedback.


GB, I'd disagree that you'll ALWAYS need a live act... depends on what type of music you are making. It could be argued that this is in your own interest if you intend to ever make any money from this.

EDIT:

PS, in answer to your OP question... yes, I'd get your music as finished & polished as possible... especially in the dance music field, half produced 'demos' are not going to cut it.
Old 15th December 2010
  #11
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Mardi Gras's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Here are some random sentences in no apparent order:

When I was starting out, I made a list of EVERY record label relevant to my niche genre. I found their contact details & sent them a CD in the post.
From that, I ultimately got two labels interested & that I went on to release my music with.

That was about 3/4 years ago.


Nowadays, I'd say the same thing applies... but look up how the labels prefer to receive demos... some prefer digital, some still like a CD. (they normally state on their website).

If sending digitally, send a download link... don't email them with a 20MB attachment.

Some labels are open to demos, some will not listen to anything that isn't personally recommended to them by a known source.

MAKE SURE THE LABELS YOU TARGET ARE RELEVANT TO YOUR MUSIC.


Above all, the most important thing is to have KILLER music. Once you are established, you may get away with some more mediocre tracks... but your first breakthrough needs to be super-amazing.
I read a comment on here a while ago along the lines of 'if your music makes DJs look good, they will want to play it & your music will get signed'. Simple.


Send your music to pirate radio DJs. Build hype, even if you don't have a deal.

Consider giving your music away free on a net label... then hitting up all the pirate DJs... build hype.


Find out who is in charge of the labels you want to be signed to, go to their gigs, accost them & (politely) force your CD down their throat. Tell them you'll drop them an email to see if they have any feedback.


GB, I'd disagree that you'll ALWAYS need a live act... depends on what type of music you are making. It could be argued that this is in your own interest if you intend to ever make any money from this.

EDIT:

PS, in answer to your OP question... yes, I'd get your music as finished & polished as possible... especially in the dance music field, half produced 'demos' are not going to cut it.
Nice one simon thanks a lot for that reply. When you mailed off a copy of your demo how many tracks were on it? Did you attach anything else other than contact details? A short bio or anything?
Old 15th December 2010
  #12
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DarkPlasma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristianRock View Post
DarkPlasma: let me understand. You say you've never submitted any songs yet you're giving advice on how to get noticed and how labels work? You're saying the "big guys" will listen to every song that gets into their hands, and that they accept demo uploads from strangers?

I think you need to start every one of your posts in this thread with "Well, in my fantasy world..."

A&R and the Shifting Major Label Landscape
The Andromeda A6 sucks hehheh

Anyway, it really makes no difference if I submitted any tracks or not, its the logic of promoting yourself, and the OP asked a question, and I explained my logic. Simple as that.

Now, if you are just gonna critisize other people's logic without providing yours, and say thats what you get on a public forum, your opinion is a waste in this thread lol
Old 15th December 2010
  #13
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Good advice from Simonator

I will add:
If you are making dance tracks don't just target labels. Start getting out to shows. Get your cd into the hands of your favorite local djs. Djs always love exclusive music. Especially if it is good. In addition to that get it into the hands of the big international ones you like as well. Be sure to have all your contact info on that cd.
Old 15th December 2010
  #14
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
Nice one simon thanks a lot for that reply. When you mailed off a copy of your demo how many tracks were on it? Did you attach anything else other than contact details? A short bio or anything?
I suspect it was probably just one track... but only 'coz that's all we had at the time!
3 tracks should be fine I would think. Obviously put the best one first.

I also included a brief biog & contact details yes. Think that was all.


Also, have you posted your music up on Gearslutz yet? I personally know of several artists who had their first release simply from posting their music in this very sub forum.
Old 15th December 2010
  #15
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Arghh... has literally EVERYONE except for me changed their avatars. I don't recognise your faces anymore!!
Old 15th December 2010
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Arghh... has literally EVERYONE except for me changed their avatars. I don't recognise your faces anymore!!
Sorry... should I change it back?
Old 15th December 2010
  #17
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubtek71 View Post
Sorry... should I change it back?
Ha, yes! You've changed from Bio-weapon menace into early 90s modern art!

Bring back the bio hazard!
Old 15th December 2010
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Ha, yes! You've changed from Bio-weapon menace into early 90s modern art!

Bring back the bio hazard!
Its actually a painting by Wassily Kandinsky called Farbstudie Quadrate(1913). He is a pretty interesting guy who experienced synesthesia
Wassily Kandinsky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I do like my bio-hazard avatar tho. Its reclaimed urban art. I removed it from the side of a condemned building. I am sure it will make a return.
Old 15th December 2010
  #19
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Ki-Lab's Avatar
 

Hm, how to get noticed by labels?

1) Be very good. If your music or live act isn't awesome, why would they take notice?

2) Become friends with acts already on the label. Seriously. Word of mouth counts for more than an anonymously submitted demo. How do you do this? However possible: be a roadie, open for the band, get into promotions, ... think about what you can offer said band (doing flyers, etc).

3) Do as much as possible on your own without relying on a "label". If you can offer them an already mastered track that is generating a buzz, it's less they have to do.
Old 15th December 2010
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ki-Lab View Post

3) Do as much as possible on your own without relying on a "label".
Good advice.

The best outcome is when an appropriate label comes to you. This might happen when you've been pursuing your music on your own for a while, built up a following and have a buzz about your music. There are millions of artists out there, and labels are most attracted to artists that already have an audience and already have a buzz going.
No, most of the time labels do not listen to demos.
Do you realize how many demos they get per week? And how many of those are amateurish rubbish. Labels find out about artists on the grapevine, as i said through a following and a buzz.
The smaller the label the more likelihood they'll look at a demo, but the bigger labels..... no.
You're in danger of working towards a demo to attract label attention. This is the wrong attitude. The right attitude is to work towards making great music that people will like. Once you've been doing it a while successfully, the labels will take a lot more interest.
Old 15th December 2010
  #21
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DarkPlasma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
You're in danger of working towards a demo to attract label attention. This is the wrong attitude. The right attitude is to work towards making great music that people will like. Once you've been doing it a while successfully, the labels will take a lot more interest.
Very true.
Old 15th December 2010
  #22
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Questions on getting noticed by a label as an artist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras

thanks for the replies.

Do labels actually listen to demo's sent to them? I always thought that they wouldn't be interested since they probably think a lot is crap
For about ten seconds each, sure.
Old 16th December 2010
  #23
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Originally Posted by mattyc View Post
For about ten seconds each, sure.
Exactly. If you can't get their attention with the first 10 seconds, forget it.
Old 20th December 2010
  #24
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Mardi Gras's Avatar
 

sorry to bump an old thread, is it worth copywriting my music before i send it to labels?
Old 20th December 2010
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
sorry to bump an old thread, is it worth copywriting my music before i send it to labels?
Your music is automatically copy-written as soon as you record it (either as written notation or even simply just making an audio track on your computer.)... But I assume you are talking about protecting that copyright.

It's not really likely that labels will try to steal your ideas. But if you REALLY think you are sitting on audio gold that everyone will want to steal, you can send the track as a CD to your lawyer by recorded delivery.
Old 21st December 2010
  #26
Registered User
 

Never give up!
Old 30th December 2011
  #27
Here for the gear
 

Hello I know this thread is old but I wanted to breathe some life into it.

I have a bachelor's degree in Music Business and I worked for a major record label before getting the job I have now as a marketing manager for a CD/DVD/Print manufacturing firm called xxxxxxxxxxx.

Since I used to see what the A&R reps at labels get every day I helped develop a "state-of-the-art" press kit and EPK for Ultra. I guarantee you no label has seen something like this (unless they've gotten one made by us of course haha)

I think it's important to make your press kit stand out, AND make it simple. Sending in your demo with a bunch of newspaper clippings and your bio printed on an 8.5x11 piece of paper is not unique. YOU NEED to make sure that the person opening your stuff at the label gets their attention caught or else you risk the chance of having your stuff thrown away before even being listened to/looked at.

I hope that helps
-Nat

Last edited by Don Solaris; 6th January 2012 at 11:26 PM.. Reason: erm..... this is not how your first post should look like.
Old 30th December 2011
  #28
Ham
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Ham's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by golden beers View Post
you need:
1) strong music
2) a good live act.
3) confidence
sometimes all you need is one or the other. preferably both. and if you want money you need to gig.
fixed
Old 30th December 2011
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acid Mitch View Post
I have a friend doing a college course and apparently everyone has to start their own net based label to promote themselves.

I guess starting your own is the best way to get noticed
In that vein - what about posting your best tune on youtube and getting lots of views?

As far as playing live - try to developing a following when you play live.
Old 30th December 2011
  #30
Gear Nut
 

Honestly. If you feel your music is ready, then send it off to labels.
I just got signed a few weeks ago and it's because I sent my tracks around.
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