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Questions on getting noticed by a label as an artist. Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 30th December 2011
  #31
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There's a very fine line between getting a contract and getting a restraining order, you may have to walk that line.

Playing Live may not matter at all, depends on genre an scene. I'm very confused to why people would have even suggested that. If you're producing more Techno based styles or Hip Hop (for example), yes, if you are producing Drum and Bass, no.

Your final question relates to the Label, and what you are worth to them, but no-one is going to turn down well mastered final products.

It could be said it's not as hard to get signed these days, open to argument I imagine.
Old 30th December 2011
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UltraNatalie View Post
Hello I know this thread is old but I wanted to breathe some life into it.

[REMOVED BY MODERATOR]

I think it's important to make your press kit stand out, AND make it simple. Sending in your demo with a bunch of newspaper clippings and your bio printed on an 8.5x11 piece of paper is not unique. YOU NEED to make sure that the person opening your stuff at the label gets their attention caught or else you risk the chance of having your stuff thrown away before even being listened to/looked at.

I hope that helps
-Nat
That's a pretty spammy bump of a long-dead thread, and I very much doubt you'll ever be coming back to read this... but for anyone else's benefit-

I personally feel that your product would be a total waste of money for anyone making contemporary electronic music. Worse still, I think it would actually have a negative impact on how a demo was received.
It's possible that the A&R at a Macedonian folk music label might find something like this positive, but I think that any electronic music label will find this pretty ridiculous, and just trash the demo without playing it.

Also, your website looks like a joke.
Old 30th December 2011
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post

I personally feel that your product would be a total waste of money for anyone making contemporary electronic music. Worse still, I think it would actually have a negative impact on how a demo was received.
It's possible that the A&R at a Macedonian folk music label might find something like this positive, but I think that any electronic music label will find this pretty ridiculous, and just trash the demo without playing it.

Also, your website looks like a joke.
I think the full on Press Kit would be a waste yeah. Using a pretty coloured CD (or a CD with an image on) on other other hand, might not. At least they would be able to find it again if they liked it...
Old 30th December 2011
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.A.D View Post
Honestly. If you feel your music is ready, then send it off to labels.
I just got signed a few weeks ago and it's because I sent my tracks around.
Yes this. I got my first tracks signed by mailing out demos. Labels do listen, and if you're good they call you up and ask for the track.

If you're not getting this kind of response, you have more work to do.

Live shows won't get you signed. A live show is worthless if you don't have big songs/tracks to perform.
Old 30th December 2011
  #35
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For electronic music a press kit is absolutely useless, and those prices and very high.
Old 30th December 2011
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
For electronic music a press kit is absolutely useless, and those prices and very high.

Useless. No bells and whistles will sell mediocre irrelevant music, and good relevant music will get recognized.

If its not getting recognition, its either not that good, or not relevant.
Old 30th December 2011
  #37
Gear Maniac
 

I sent a press kit when I got my first deal and it was with what most people would consider a pretty big pair of labels
Old 30th December 2011
  #38
Gear Nut
 

Yea no need for all this talk about press kits .... Good music is good music period.
Old 30th December 2011
  #39
Gear Addict
 

Also fwiw, Simon, the whole copyright by mailing registered mail with a master of the material is an urban myth. That does not work, and has been torn apart in court in the '90s. See "poor man's copyright" for more info--although I wager you'll still get a lot of incorrect info. If you want it official, then submit the song or album to your country's copyright registrar.

But you are correct in saying everything is copyrighted by default at the time of creation, unlike patents. But the more official proof you have, the better off you are in a court of law. I'd say an Ableton Live project is pretty damn good proof though, so I don't bother (but I also don't share my projects).
Old 30th December 2011
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thefunnel View Post
Also fwiw, Simon, the whole copyright by mailing registered mail with a master of the material is an urban myth. That does not work, and has been torn apart in court in the '90s. See "poor man's copyright" for more info--although I wager you'll still get a lot of incorrect info. If you want it official, then submit the song or album to your country's copyright registrar.

But you are correct in saying everything is copyrighted by default at the time of creation, unlike patents. But the more official proof you have, the better off you are in a court of law. I'd say an Ableton Live project is pretty damn good proof though, so I don't bother (but I also don't share my projects).

Just mail your music out. No need to copyright first. I've never officially copywritten a thing before its official release through a label, and have sold/signed probably 100 songs/tracks by now over the past 13 years.
Old 30th December 2011
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thefunnel View Post
Also fwiw, Simon, the whole copyright by mailing registered mail with a master of the material is an urban myth. That does not work, and has been torn apart in court in the '90s. See "poor man's copyright" for more info--although I wager you'll still get a lot of incorrect info. If you want it official, then submit the song or album to your country's copyright registrar.
I know that mailing it to yourself is pretty futile, but sure if you mailed it to your lawyer as I suggested, and they will vouch for it, that will be accepted by a court as proof, no?
Old 30th December 2011
  #42
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I run a small indie and have releasing music as an artist for about 7years now. I started out giving my music away for free on Internet forums where I knew some djs and some label owners posted, eventually I made friends, got signed and my "career" was underway. I'm not sure this approach is possible nowadays and to be honest if you've made something you love you'll think it deserves a proper release, and most forums are full of tools and half arsed producers trying to get noticed. Some demos I get sent are too funny, alot of people upload a private track to soundcloud and send a message with the link. It's usually a generic message, something like, "hi, I love your label and think my tracks are for you". Fine, problem being you can see that 100 or more other people have access to this private track. The point I'm trying to make is that u need to build a rapport with a label, mail them first to ask if you can send a demo, and how they would like it. Be polite, write to each individually, make them feel special. I don't know what type of music you make but the scene I'm in is relatively small and I know from experience that I need to like the people I sign as I'm gonna be working with them and if they're a dick they're just gonna make me and my label look bad. I'd say the best thing you can do is send the music to the djs you want to be playing it, go to their gigs and have a chat with them, put the cd in their hand (many prefer a USB stick now) get their contact (mail,fb whatever) leave it a week or so and follow it up, mail them again if they don't reply mail again. These people are usually busy and may be pushed to reply to everyone, if they don't reply then, move on. Don't hassle people, chances are they don't like your music and don't want to have to tell you. As for the quality of your.tracks, get them to the highest standard possible yourself, I certainly wouldn't ever master them myself or pay for them to be mastered myself. And I wouldn't use a master sent by a producer for release, I like my mastering guy and trust him to do a good job. To sum up, make amazing music, be a nice guy, go meet the people you want to work with, see if you get on.
Old 30th December 2011
  #43
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Remember to write in paragraphs too.
Old 30th December 2011
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CountingToes View Post
And I wouldn't use a master sent by a producer for release
Even if it sounded perfect and was in the correct format, at the correct level?

Why not? Do you get a commission from the mastering fee that you insist the artists pay?
Old 31st December 2011
  #45
Gear Addict
 

From experience I've found that any mastered wav I receive direct from the artist may be good to release digitally and play out but wouldn't translate well to vinyl. I also like the consistency i get by working with the same engineer

Echoing what I said in the post above about getting to know the labels you work with, I tend to only put out my own and my mates music now, so the money side is very relaxed. I also split the mastering costs with the artist, I'm very fair, infact I often pay for pr and source high profile remixes for free without any cost to the artist.
I spent many years as an artist signed to other labels so am aware of what goes on, I know of other successful labels in my genre that don't pay artists anything and use the labels profile as a supposed payment due to the increase in gigs and fee the artist is likely to receive.
Old 31st December 2011
  #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.A.D View Post
Yea no need for all this talk about press kits .... Good music is good music period.
Nah sorry dude it doesn't work like that even if we all wish it did

Good music doesn't even remotely guarantee success not even close, it just helps.

I spent way more time and work establishing a brand identity and pushing to where I got than I ever did learning the musical/engineering process

Nobody wants to hear it but it's true and very very rarely is the pattern broken

It can, it's just likely it wont
Old 31st December 2011
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CountingToes View Post
From experience I've found that any mastered wav I receive direct from the artist may be good to release digitally and play out but wouldn't translate well to vinyl.
Obviously everything that gets ripped to vinyl is going to need mastering at that point to apply the RIAA equalisation etc.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CountingToes View Post
infact I often pay for pr and source high profile remixes for free without any cost to the artist.
Isn't that the basic remit of a label?- make the music available, and promote it.

What genre are you working in?
Old 31st December 2011
  #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh... View Post
Nah sorry dude it doesn't work like that even if we all wish it did

Good music doesn't even remotely guarantee success not even close, it just helps.
You've misunderstood what I.A.D. was saying. He never claimed that good music guarantees success, he just said that spending $hundreds on fancy packaging is BS.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh... View Post
I spent way more time and work establishing a brand identity and pushing to where I got than I ever did learning the musical/engineering process
Who are you?
Old 31st December 2011
  #49
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Sounds like he could be in N-Dubz from that quote.
Old 31st December 2011
  #50
Gear Maniac
 

I'm me

Also I discredited myself by saying the time spent bs because it's not true

I spent 6 years learning how to make good music before I ever spent a day dreaming up a brand

Then after spending a couple of years nailing the brand it was back to music since then

Sorry for misinformation don't listen to that

Music is always #1 it just needs a lot of help for success because the world is fvcked up in a lot of ways

I suppose that's a good time to add that it helps to have a lot of confidence in your work as long as its based in reality

I have a ton of confidence in my work. If I didn't and then I listened to what half the people on the Internet said in places like these I would probably have killed myself or something absurd like that (except muffwiglers, awesome place, I heart you)

Confidence and thick skin, must haves
Old 31st December 2011
  #51
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Naked DJing?
Old 31st December 2011
  #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue monk View Post
Naked DJing?
I was going to say, paint yourself silver, strap a poodle to the back of your head, then reverse your car through their reception, get out, naked, and shout "SUPRISSSSSSSSSSSSEEE!" but it seemed very serious, so I didn't.
Old 31st December 2011
  #53
Gear Nut
 

Simonator, thanks. You got exactly what I was saying.

Don't be scared to send your tracks around. The worst you get is a no and you move on. Develop your tracks more, put more depth into them, learn more techniques and grow as an artist. And one day hopefully a label will like it and there you go.
Old 31st December 2011
  #54
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh... View Post
Nah sorry dude it doesn't work like that even if we all wish it did

Good music doesn't even remotely guarantee success not even close, it just helps.

I spent way more time and work establishing a brand identity and pushing to where I got than I ever did learning the musical/engineering process

Nobody wants to hear it but it's true and very very rarely is the pattern broken

It can, it's just likely it wont

The amount of networking you have to do is inversely proportional to how good/relevant your music is.

If you had to spend more time networking than making music, you probably ended up somewhere in the lower-middle of the pack with no real hits, and your music was moderately good/relevant at best. Just the truth.

Learn to write an undeniable relevant hit, and you won't have to network much. You just need one DJ who's looped in to start playing it, and if its a hit, every other DJ will be asking him "whats that track!!" and then it snowballs. This is how certain new guys get big seemingly overnight.
Old 31st December 2011
  #55
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CountingToes View Post
From experience I've found that any mastered wav I receive direct from the artist may be good to release digitally and play out but wouldn't translate well to vinyl. I also like the consistency i get by working with the same engineer

Echoing what I said in the post above about getting to know the labels you work with, I tend to only put out my own and my mates music now, so the money side is very relaxed. I also split the mastering costs with the artist, I'm very fair, infact I often pay for pr and source high profile remixes for free without any cost to the artist.
I spent many years as an artist signed to other labels so am aware of what goes on, I know of other successful labels in my genre that don't pay artists anything and use the labels profile as a supposed payment due to the increase in gigs and fee the artist is likely to receive.
Let's say an artist did get a signing offer from one of these labels. After the initial excitement wears off, what are the main terms (contract-wise) an artist should be looking for in a good contract?

In other words, what the best case scenario for an artists contract?

What in particular, should the artist be concerned about?
Old 31st December 2011
  #56
Gear Addict
 

Im thinking about going in to a labels office in my country, hand them a ep and talk some..What do you guys think about this one?
Old 1st January 2012
  #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freddman View Post
Im thinking about going in to a labels office in my country, hand them a ep and talk some..What do you guys think about this one?

Done it to several labels for one of my projects several years ago. Never got me a deal. Why? The project was 2nd rate. It could work though, I'm never against trying things. But I swear, networking is only the answer if you want a place in the lower middle of the pack. Huge relevant songs are what you need.

If you've sent relevant songs to several DJs and labels and are getting no response, your music isn't 100% yet. An in-person smile, handshake, and small talk will not fix this. Analyze where you're weak and work your ass off to strengthen. If its your engineering, works like crazy till you've got a great sound. If its musical knowledge, study chords and melodies by learning a bunch of other songs on keys. Etc etc. When your songs are objectively dope in relation to a current scene, people will notice. Yes, objectively. From a personal perspective everything is subjective (the "cop out" rationalization trap imo, should success by your goal, which I assume it is for everyone asking questions in this thread). But in relation to whats going on in the world, objective exists and is the goal if you value success.
Old 1st January 2012
  #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Done it to several labels for one of my projects several years ago. Never got me a deal. Why? The project was 2nd rate. It could work though, I'm never against trying things. But I swear, networking is only the answer if you want a place in the lower middle of the pack. Huge relevant songs are what you need.

If you've sent relevant songs to several DJs and labels and are getting no response, your music isn't 100% yet. An in-person smile, handshake, and small talk will not fix this. Analyze where you're weak and work your ass off to strengthen. If its your engineering, works like crazy till you've got a great sound. If its musical knowledge, study chords and melodies by learning a bunch of other songs on keys. Etc etc. When your songs are objectively dope in relation to a current scene, people will notice. Yes, objectively. From a personal perspective everything is subjective (the "cop out" rationalization trap imo, should success by your goal, which I assume it is for everyone asking questions in this thread). But in relation to whats going on in the world, objective exists and is the goal if you value success.
You sorta went off on a tangent there about the quality of the guys music rather than answering his question.

**** music won't get you signed whatever way you present it of course, but in answer to the question; yes I think dropping your demo off in person is a good idea and I personally think they're more likely to give it a listen this way.
Old 1st January 2012
  #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mardi Gras View Post
You sorta went off on a tangent there about the quality of the guys music rather than answering his question.
It was meant in general, not about him specifically in any way. I'm offering the mentality for success in the music business, answering the question in the title of this thread, stating that knocking on label's doors is essentially a "duct tape" solution. I went from broke to absolutely loaded off of music by getting my head in the right place and approaching things the right way after wasting time on many of the wrong approaches. Just $.02.
Old 4th January 2012
  #60
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
That's a pretty spammy bump of a long-dead thread, and I very much doubt you'll ever be coming back to read this... but for anyone else's benefit-

I personally feel that your product would be a total waste of money for anyone making contemporary electronic music. Worse still, I think it would actually have a negative impact on how a demo was received.
It's possible that the A&R at a Macedonian folk music label might find something like this positive, but I think that any electronic music label will find this pretty ridiculous, and just trash the demo without playing it.

Also, your website looks like a joke.


Sorry, didn't mean to be spammy I was just trying to help.

I agree that you need to be conscious of your genre and know the industry standard for what you're going for. Obviously electronic music wouldn't really fit into that kind of a press kit model and honestly if someone asked us to do that for them I'm sure we'd advise a different strategy.


Again, sorry I really was just trying to help
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