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What's with the 80's love anyway?
Old 23rd November 2009
  #91
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jduffy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Odey View Post
Don't follow you dude?
I was making a reference to a 90's song since we were onabout a nineties revival!


BTW, i personally belive the song was referencing drugs?
Or is that not the case? Because it seems quite obvious?
Old 23rd November 2009
  #92
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crufty's Avatar
funny, I was just thinking the very same thing. When acid house showed up, it was a completely new sound. Even a simple 909/303 was as new and fresh as a sunrise at dawn.

It's not the first time this has happened. If history is any predictor of the future, instead of new sound perhaps we'll see new styles of composition, with increasing intricacy and complex (sounding) melodic content.

ie
File:O frondens 2.ogg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
->
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Old 23rd November 2009
  #93
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Odey's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jduffy View Post
I was making a reference to a 90's song since we were onabout a nineties revival!


BTW, i personally belive the song was referencing drugs?
Or is that not the case? Because it seems quite obvious?
Got it!!

I think the early nineties was taking alot of the groove elements of the seventies funk scene and fusing it with ambient textures. Tracks had a flow that I had never heard before. It was using the same equipment as the eighties but implemented completely differently and MUCH MUCH better.. In my opinion of course. It was a sound I fell in love with at the time and still love to this day.
Old 23rd November 2009
  #94
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chrisrnps's Avatar
 

Simplistic? I have "The Eighties Love" because of the very complexities and multi-faceted techniques, both from a literary and music-theory standpoint, that managed to sneak onto the pop charts then, as compared to the dumbed-down-beyond-holding-my-interest productions that seem to dominate music now. Only the absolute worst of the worst (Billy Ocean "Get out of my dreams and into my car" comes to mind) of the 80s approach what seems to be de rigeur in 2009.

A couple typical examples, and not even what I consider "the best of the 80s"...

Guitar, keyboards, vox, bassline all play layered counterpoints to each other at different times, guitar playing arpeggio / ostinato parts right out of classical baroque techiques, surprise modulation from minor to a major key at the end of each stanza of the verses, keyboard is playing a simplified version of the vox melody during the verses, but with a slower rhythm that gradually falls behind the vocal melody over the course of each line, so what starts out as a simple doubling at the start of each line turns into a variation on a round / counterpoint technique by the end of each phrase. The vocal melodies are catchy and memorable, but unlike so much of "current" rock and pop, when the song is over, you "take away" so many of the other instrumental parts too - if this song gets stuck in your head, you're just as likely to be humming the verse or chorus guitar patterns, or the keyboard chord stabs in the chorus, as you are the vocal lines. The mood is "mysterious" or "evocative" or "bittersweet", rather than "look how tough I am", "look how much money I have", "I wanna stick it in you", or "I can't be held responsible for cheating on you 'cause them boobies were all up in my grill, what was I 'sposed to do?".

This is why I have The Eighties Love.



Shortwave radio chatter gives way to ostinato bassline and drum/percussion patterns holding down the verses while guitars, synths, manipulated samples, and all sorts of other stuff come in and out of the mix with sweeping chords, melodic ornamentation, stabs, and effects. On the chorus, the guitar plays a truncated arpeggiated riff, then some funk chord stabs, back to an arpeggiated part - nowadays it's so often just somebody going "chugga chugga chugga" on the verses and "big dumb chords" on the chorus. A precursor to the now-ubiquitous 'guest rap breakdown", only it's not rap, it's Grace Jones playing up her Jamaican accent and going for an abstract-spoken-word thing that sounds more like a voodoo queen doing a narrative voiceover in an art film.

This song kicks off with "Wild kind of look to the day / opening eyes impale neon flickers...the city's her slave, but he's cheating his mistress...", has "she's moody and grey, she's mean and she's restless" as the pre-chorus hook, was marketed with an on-location-in-Paris video that's a tribute to a 1946 Cocteau art film and features a cameo by William S. Burroughs, and was an international Top 10 hit (#6 U.S., #7 U.K., #5 Ireland, #1 Italy, etc.).

Today, the #6 song in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 is Britney Spears "3".

This is why I have The Eighties Love.



U.S. #1 for two weeks in May 1986, "West End Girls" features Neil Tennant doing a London white-boy-rap take on a uniquely British "icy persona" character pioneered by David Bowie and Gary Numan, as Chris Lowe stands silently by his side, never looking into the camera and at times literally fading away through a double-exposure effect - the artsy Teller to his Penn. The song is about class/caste tension, alienation in an urban environment, "existential anxiety", "urban neuroses", and the alienation and difficulty in forging a human connection in a modern urban landscape. The spark for writing the song, beginning with the passage "Sometimes you're better off dead, there's a gun in your hand and it's pointing at your head", came from T.S. Eliot's 1922 Wasteland, and similarly switches narrative perspective several times throughout the song, which would be a rather advanced technique for a novel, much less a pop song lyric. The artists are a former professional writer with a history degree and an architecture student, who met in an electronics shop. The music is pretty good too, with a desolate, atmospheric, layered sound befitting the cold, removed-observer lyrical narrative.

The U. S. #1 hits for the entirety of the month of May this year were "Poker Face" by Lady Gaga, and "Boom Boom Pow" by Black Eyed Peas, which are about closing off one's emotions during casual sex when you'd actually rather be with someone else ("I won't tell you that I love you / kiss or hug you / 'cause I'm bluffin' with my mufffin'... no he can't read my poker face / she's got to love nobody...") and how the beat is boomin', and other people aren't as good at making boomin' beats as you are. Lyrical highlights include "oh, oh, oh, oh, ohhh, oh, oh, eee, oh, oh, ohh", "Mum mum mum mah, mum mum mum mah", and "Gotta get, get, gotta get, get, gotta get-get, gotta g-g-get, Get, get, get, get, get, get, get, Boom boom boom, boom boom boom, boom boom boom, boom boom boom...boom boom, boom, Gotta get-get...Yo, I got that hit that beat the block!" The artists are a former "Kids Incorporated" starlet and a former staff songwriter for New Kids on the Block, Britney Spears, and Pussycat Dolls.

This is why I have The Eighties Love.



The 00s have been all about whitewashed, rehashed, everybody-copying-everybody-else commercial hip-hop songs about chrome rims on cars, getting drunk, being able to physically overpower other people through the use of firearms and vehicular assault, and f*#king. The eighties had people dressing up in powdered wigs and frock coats dancing to a German guy singing a #1 hit single rap song about Mozart, and at least two of the most popular movies of the decade were about people dressing up in powdered wigs and frock coats, dancing to Mozart, getting drunk, and f*#king.

This is why I have The Eighties Love.
Old 23rd November 2009
  #95
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+100

modern pop music reflects modern main stream society, or better the cultural degradation of
the average "pop" society, the emotional emptiness and the rawness. The old songs invited
the listener to many impressions, facettes of different emotions. Where do you find that now?
Of course there are always exceptions.
Old 24th November 2009
  #96
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jduffy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeProducer View Post
modern pop music reflects modern main stream society, or better the degradation of
our society
I totally aggree with you. they make music to refect upon our daily lives, music we can relate to, or at least they think we can.

Just fancied editing the quote btw, I think both pop culture and our society are eroding in tandem!
Old 24th November 2009
  #97
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GYang's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kasprouch View Post
look at hiphop, the output was incredible until the mid 90's then boom, all went to crap.
biggest, stinking shit is better say for that.
When you watch and listen all latest releases in hh, rnb and similar genres you see several names as producers-performers turning around similar cheapo hits all the time. seems all the system is corrupted to degree that total debilisation took place in the boardrooms of tv and entertainment corporations.
Old 24th November 2009
  #98
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Everett Paul's Avatar
 

Stupido-Line

Aeonsound you nailed it for me in this post.

Basically the entire 80s revival phenomenon thats been going on the past few years (mostly driven by hipsters so young they were probably foetuses in 1989), it is a false memory, a recreation of an 80s that never actually existed. The bands you mention were the real 80s to me, having lived through it, but the current crop of fashion-magazine and social-networking inspired '80s' bands are revisionist, basing their whole existence on what they can view of the 1980s through the horse-wearing-blinkers historical 'record' that exists on Youtube.

In fact, I think I have traced the entire current hipster-80s back to a single video:

YouTube - Studio Line from L'Oreal

Could almost be a La Roux video. Note the use of Rubik's cubist colors in the set design, something obligatory in the current crap, sorry crop of 80s inspired cack.

The real bands that mattered back in the 80s, like those mentioned in the quote below, would never have engaged in social networking. Mainly because many of these bands were post-punk/new wave (Siouxsie, Killing Joke, Cocteaus, Kennedys, Clash, Joy Division etc), and frankly, partaking in the noughties phenomenon of social networking sites is not misbehaving, it's being sheeple within the confines of what large media corporations define as the playground for 'art' and 'youth' online.

Here is an example of the kind of post-post-post-post-80s abomination video out there today:

YouTube - Filthy Dukes - Tupac Robot Club Rock

Roland Juno: check, 80s Specs: check, Hotpants: check, Ghettoblaster: check, 80s Vidal Sassoon advert color scheme: check, Robot Dancing: check, written in Ableton on a Macbook: probably

What the hell kind of music is this anyway, it's like Linkin Park meets Rick Astley at some Californian art college party.

Real 80s rant /off

Quote:
Originally Posted by aeonsound View Post
the endless 80s revival: why won't it DIE?

it feels like it's been going on forever and a month. here in the UK people have been wearing stupid leggings over stupid tight jeans and stupid trashy tops with stupid gold chains and indescribably stupid bangles and insultingly stupid ray-bans since the dawn of time. it's been about a decade, for crying out loud.

it's like this tragic cultural regression. i understand fads, trends and revivals; but this has gone on Far Too Long. i was born in the 80s, and i hate the 80s.

i hate the synthetic plastic fashionista drivel. i hate the selfishness, the anti-society hypercapitalist coke*****dom. and i hate the vast majority of the music.

i understand it's temporary, and i can't wait for it to pass. i just thought that by now, the here-today, gone-tomorrow fickleness of the pop and fashion worlds would have condemned the 80s revival to the obscurity it so richly deserves.

however, a full five years after hearing the last lazy unoriginal pastiche of cheap drum machines and cheaper ideas, it's still all the vogue. and i really, honest-to-god don't get it. i don't get why anyone wants to listen to poor replications of one of popular music's most depressing decades.

it's not about the subjectivity of the near-past, either. i hate syrupy 19th century Austrian composers just as much as i hate gutless wimp-strewn 80s nothingness.

to resurrect this era of identikit awfulpop, to praise and deify what many rightly consider an abomination unto humanity; that's one thing. but to do it badly, well, shucks. perhaps it's only fitting.

which brings me on to my final point, i guess. which is this: despite my loathing for much of the decade's values and cultural legacy, what really bothers me is that there was A LOT of fantastic, wonderful music in the 80s; but it's ignored in favour of pissweak recreations of pissweak chart-topping crud.

i mean just look at some of the music - not obscure, but popular music - that took hold in the 80s:

the cure moved from the head on the door to hot hot hot. the clash rocked the casbah. joy division got a little closer. killing joke made things uncomfortable. cocteau twins changed british music forever. dead kennedys did pomo punk. gary numan. REM. tracy chapman. scary monsters. mother's milk. nothing's shocking. pretty hate machine. midnight oil. king tubby. tangerine dream.

a rich legacy, but what do we get?

pale pastiches and gutless regurgitations. numbskulls hiding their creative poverty behind a veil of faux-80s simplicity. irony deployed in place of ideas. a total and utter lack of progression, a desparate race to nowhere.

Old 24th November 2009
  #99
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crufty's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by GYang View Post
biggest, stinking shit is better say for that.
When you watch and listen all latest releases in hh, rnb and similar genres you see several names as producers-performers turning around similar cheapo hits all the time. seems all the system is corrupted to degree that total debilisation took place in the boardrooms of tv and entertainment corporations.
80s-93 rap was fun, observational or confrontational. Then studios figured out surbanites were buying it for the confrontation and zing--almost over night the observational / fun part was stamped out.
Old 2nd December 2009
  #100
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if you are 35 yrs or older and you think is not going to happen to you yeah man your taste is timeless like prince " my 12yr old son staring at my cd collection" those are ........ c c CD's dad right ! right SON !!
Old 2nd December 2009
  #101
OK, I was at high school age on the south side of Chicago in '82-'84 and in Boulder, Colorado from 84'-86', I have what may be an extreme memory of the music of the decade: It was the worst decade of them all for pop music imho, and the best decade of them all for new underground trends, some of which became mainstream.

First of all, about the pop: looks - hair styles and clothes - were largely more important than the music. There were some cases of that before and since, but it was taken to an unmatched extreme in 80's pop music. I really hated Duran Duran, and the countless other pop groups that dominated the radio in the 80's and I still do. I liked their Wedding album in the 90's. But they all had mullets, zippers, makeup, and with few exceptions, the pop music then simply had no balls. Some of the songs were catchy, but to me, it was in the super market jingle sort of way.

Something larger happened that I can't really describe: case in point, even largely synth bands like Tangerine Dream put out forgettable albums like Tyger that had that whole 80's feel. That 80's feel was contagious, there was no stopping it, and if you didn't like it, the only place to hide was the underground or with older music. A whole bunch of people chose older music, as the underground stuff, as is typical, didn't become mainstream until a decade later.

The other big thing about 80's pop is that it was a huge departure from the 70's pop: Their was no guitar. Older bands like Rush put out, imho, awful albums like Power Windows. The guitar from new music radio all but disappeared.

The phrase I remember the best about the pop of the decade was that the 60's and 70's were radicalism disguised as commercialism, and the 80's was commercialism disguised as radicalism.

There was an awful lot of rebellion against all this. I remember reading a lot of press at the time ('82-'86 or so) about how album sales were disappointing. That backlash created some great trends.

I'd say punk never really recovered, but its classic era imho was the early 80's.

I never really liked husker du and new order, but I could see why some people did.

I never really liked rap and hip hop, but it was a great and often creative outlet for a lot of people.

Industrial music started in the 80's, some of which I liked a lot. .

Slayer put out "Reign in Blood", in my extreme way the best album of the decade. The 80's (and early 90's) was definitely the classic era for death metal.

The whole techno / acid / house movement started in the 80's.

About the whole 80's revival: I don't get any of that in Fortaleza. I'm glad I'm missing it. But I will say that the pop music then really wasn't what was happening for most people: It was, for better or worse, the underground and classic rock.

Now if you really hate this 80's revival, try listening to what has taken over 90% of live music where I live and count your blessings :-) .

Forró - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Just my R$ .02 cents, that's what the forums are for.
Old 2nd December 2009
  #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iksrazal View Post
First of all, about the pop: looks - hair styles and clothes - were largely more important than the music. There were some cases of that before and since, but it was taken to an unmatched extreme in 80's pop music.
Funny. I loved Duran Duran and still like their music. For me they are the only "boy group" with intelligent songs. The look was special but if you grow up in the time, it's just "normal". I never cared for clothing etc. The cloths are somewhat silly but still
fresher than stupid hippie whool pullovers and metal rimmed glasses.
Old 2nd December 2009
  #103
Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeProducer View Post
Funny. I loved Duran Duran and still like their music. For me they are the only "boy group" with intelligent songs. The look was special but if you grow up in the time, it's just "normal". I never cared for clothing etc. The cloths are somewhat silly but still
fresher than stupid hippie whool pullovers and metal rimmed glasses.
Could you please explain to me what "smell like I sound" from "Hungry like the wolf" means? I've been wondering for 25 years :-) .

Just kidding of course.
Old 15th December 2009
  #104
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echoclerk's Avatar
 

I think you have it wrong.

I assume you are talking about that Modular Records sound, ie The Presets, Ladyhawke, CutCopy, Hot Chip, New Young Pony Club, etc.

Which really in many respects is not that 80s. the production on these is cleaner, less reverb, and sounds more like 70s Bowie / Devo / Fleetwood Mac. they just happen to be using a lot of 80s Synths cause - well thats all you can really get. what other synth sounds are there.

And regarding it being Simple: well this is coming out of the DANCE Music scene mostly.. which for the last 10 years have been stuck in a mire of 1 Loop = 1 Song, just add drum fills ad nausem...

So its arguably more complicated then a lot of house, techno, Acid house that i've heard in the last few years. (except for say basement Jaxx who are a bit of an anomally.
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