The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
A keyboard for a 10 y.o.
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

A keyboard for a 10 y.o.

Hi everyone,
Choosing a keyboard for my daughter from this list. And I am wondering whether I should considering something more serious. I mean if she likes it she probably wants something bigger like with pads to assign in FL Studio etc. So what would be your choice? not expensive, with pads, and MIDI. And 61 keys has its limitations, too. So, the struggle is real
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Hi.
This one will probably be best:


Yamaha Stagea.
A bit expensive though, but comes with a free pedal keyboard.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
djwaxxy's Avatar
I’d get her something you could also use if she loses interest.check out the Yamaha reface,Roland go there cheap ,well made,contain speakers,sound great and contain usb,midi so you can add them to your set up if you need too.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Buy her a used Roland Fantom-X. (Fantom-G if you can afford it.)
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
Transistores's Avatar
 

Guys, you've clearly never been the ten year old girls.

Unless she's seriously studying some instrument I'd opt for a compact instrument with lots of sounds. It wouldn't take much space (and wouldn't be a sore sight if it won't be used), she could carry it everywhere around the house or in backpack to play with friends (like many carry an ukulele) or at some event in school. I tried Casio SA 46 (smaller version of SA-76, 77, 78) before presenting it to nephew and felt that I really could use it in my music. Sounds felt like micro Fairlight. Kero Kero Bonito used SA-46 live, so it should be enough for anyone. Also it has a volume slider (not the case with all toy keyboards) and audio out (not the case even more). So it's lots of possibilities. Only downside is that its microKorg-like keyboard is not as sturdy as on professional instruments. Just try to show her what multitrack recording is at some point and don't be sad if she'll not use it until she'll take serious interest in the music (which may happen a bit later if at all). You can buy something more complex later when she'll feel limited by what she has, have clearer preferences in music and have need for some specific instrument.

Here SA-46 is to the left of SP-404 sampler:


Last edited by Transistores; 1 week ago at 12:04 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Here for the gear
 

i don't think there is a synth or arranger or workstation with serious big pads like those come with midi controllers

the best is to get the pads in a separate compact controller like korg nano or those from akai and try that the keyboard has a host usb for midi controller but often those are in the high-end expensive range

for beginners i think roland e-a7 is a good, it's an arranger with some synth-like sound editing/manipulating and rythem/sound composition
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
sin night's Avatar
I'd suggest to get something with:

- standard full size keys (when learning an instrument, some actions/movements become "automatic": if you learn them on a keyboard with standard full size width, you can move more easily to piano if you'll want to... and in general, standard size keyboards are more playable than minikeys... I have a mixture of standard and minikeys on my setup, the master keyboard in front of my pc has minikeys but I prefer keyboards with standard piano width... hand size should not be an issue at this point; my piano teacher used to start teaching child when they are around 6-7 years old on a normal piano - and I'm sure plenty of other teachers do the same - so...)
- a decent number of keys (49 to 61... ideally 61)
- velocity sensitive keyboards (I don't know if this feature is for granted on those cheap "child" keyboard - mine, at the end of the 90ies, had fixed velocity)
- built in sounds (with a wide palette)... that's something I loved when I got a cheap Casio keyboard at 11 or 12 at the end of the 90ies (previously I had a Bontempi organ), I had fun using them and it helped getting me engaged... and it's a good thing to be able to turn on an instrument and being able to play, without having to turn on a computer...
- built in speakers and headphone socket (if you have built in sounds, you'll want to listend to them without additional equipment... professional equipment often lacks this feature because you would use an external sound system, while on a cheap "home/child targeted" instrument is a really importan feature)
- decent polyphony (so you can play chords with both hands)...
- midi (so it can be used with a pc, so it can be useful once you want more than the internal sounds - I think midi gives a better resale value, anyway) through usb or even just with the old midi din (a cheap usb midi interface doesn't break the bank)...
- modulation and pitch wheels/stick are a nice to have if within budget (especially if the keyboard ends up being used as a mute midi keyboard for virtual synths and such).


In my opinion, pads are not essential... I never get into playing with pads (maybe it's just me), but that's something that can be added later if making music with a pc and a midi keyboard (for example, you can get a nanoPad2).


I'd also suggest not to worry too much about a possible use with a computer, other than getting something with midi. When working with synths and music software, you'll probably want some knobs and maybe some pads (if you like using those), so you'll probably end up buying a midi controller of a mute keyboard dedicated to those tasks at a later stage... but a cheap "home/child" keyboard equipped with midi can still be useful when starting out making music with a pc...


I would say that anything by Casio, Yamaha, Roland or Korg is likely to be fine.


What I would really care about, it's to keep your daughter engaged. I would ask you if the decision to get a keyboard is something coming out of you as parents or if she's genuinely interested in making music and she asks for it. If this is coming from you as parents and you're testing the water, I'd say to get one of those cheap keyboards as written before; but if it's something asked by your daughter, try to understand what she really wants to do (not just now, but in perspective in a few years), so you can have a better idea of the requirement for the instrument (say she's really interested in piano and nothing else, you'd be better getting her a digital piano, maybe an entry level model, instead of one of those keyboards...)
Learning an instrument takes time/effort and keyboards/piano are not the most rewarding instrument at the beginning, so it's important that you can keep your daughter engaged.

As a first child instrument, my rule of thumb is cheap and with midi (to provide "room for development")...

Just my opinion, of course!
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Gear Nut
 

Everyone expects their kids to turn into Mozart. It never happens. Just buy some cheap Casio and be done with it, so you’re not pissing away hundreds of dollars on something that’s only gonna collect dust and stored in the attic a year later.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 

What a weird article you've chosen to guide your decision! And what strange replies here!
Sure, the Electone or even a grand piano would probably be "best"..... But no-one suggested a keytar yet? (see EDIT below!)

If she wants a keyboard, you probably should get her a red Casio CT-S200. EDIT: Rather, get the CT-S300 It's touch sensitive (unlike the 200), though not red. $150. There's a version with light-up keys controlled by an app, to help you learn songs, that costs a little more (Casio LK-S250). I don't think it comes in red, either.

Another option is a MIDI controller with keys and pads, and an iPad with some apps. You'd have to set everything up in this case, but after initial help, she'll figure it out.

EDIT: Other options include Roland GO:KEYS and Yamaha Sonogenic. Sonogenic is cool for kids.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
HSi
Lives for gear
 
HSi's Avatar
 

She sounds pretty fussy.

https://novationmusic.com/en/keys/launchkey

That's pretty much what you're describing. I would be fairly sure it works well with FL studio as their Launchpad products do, you'd have to google ir. The thing is, the really cheap stuff is little more than a toy in most cases.

There's a difference between a midi controller and keyboard, I think it's a midi controller you're after, something that just controls Fruity Loops?
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Gear Head
 
Cynthia Size A's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich303 View Post
Everyone expects their kids to turn into Mozart. It never happens. Just buy some cheap Casio and be done with it, so you’re not pissing away hundreds of dollars on something that’s only gonna collect dust and stored in the attic a year later.
It happened once. He wanted a banjo, but his mum bought him a piano. How they laughed, later.

Rich303 is right - a cheap Casio, with midi.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Gear Nut
 
Mr. Syc's Avatar
 

Korg microsampler
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Lives for gear
 

I just got a Roland go keys for a 8 year old relative and it was a great choice. It’s not crazy but it’s def a step above the toys and has quick easy sounds and bt for using an iPAd
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transistores View Post
Guys, you've clearly never been the ten year old girls . . .
My thinking on kids is if you have the means, buy them something decent. My GF's kid started doing YouTube gaming videos, so I equipped him with a good-quality streaming box, upgraded SSD, and a pro-audio microphone.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by studio460 View Post
My thinking on kids is if you have the means, buy them something decent.
Exactly.

If you buy something cheap and crappy, the kid will notice the crappiness pretty quickly and the machine will end up collecting dust and mice excrements in the attic.
And the passion for music will die forever.
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
orangecaruption's Avatar
 

I'd go for anything Behringer since it's cheap and designed for beginners. And if she doesn't become mozart and stops taking piano lessons before high school like 99% of kids, then you can give it to the Goodwill with little investment made.
Old 1 week ago
  #17
Lives for gear
 

Go:KEYS in Brazil:


Casio tone (I changed my mind... CTS200 isn't touch sensitive. CTS300 or LK is a better idea):


Yamaha PSR E363:


Yamahaha Sonogenic




I'd swear Yamaha is trolling their own customers, with these videos! Yikes!

If I were 10 again, I'd want the Roland, but my cheap parents would get me the CTS300 instead, and I'd be so happy I had even that. It's way way better than the Casio CT-630 they actually got me. It had maybe twenty sounds and rhythms. Despite that, it didn't turn me off from music forever. It just got me started! (on keyboards... first was violin)
Old 1 week ago
  #18
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutantt View Post
Exactly.

If you buy something cheap and crappy, the kid will notice the crappiness pretty quickly and the machine will end up collecting dust and mice excrements in the attic.
And the passion for music will die forever.
I disagree entirely. When I was 8 years old, I wanted a Gibson double neck SG. My mother bought me a $30 acoustic guitar. I wasn’t too thrilled about it. But I made the best of it. When I was 13, she bought me my first electric guitar. It was only $60. Again, it wasn’t what I wanted. But I made the best of it. My mother told me that if I keep playing, she’ll buy me a better guitar on my next birthday. A year later, she bought me a $200 Les Paul copy. It didn’t come close to the real thing. But I kept playing, started working and buying my own guitars, amps, and pedals from age 14 onward. It’s all about appreciating what you’re given and making the best of it until you can afford to upgrade. If you can’t do that, then you really don’t have much of a desire to be a musician.
Old 1 week ago
  #19
Lives for gear
 

I was a bit younger when I got a Casio WK-1600. I still have it. I think I was 11 or 12 when I got an ensoniq ASRX. Years and years and I still suck
Old 1 week ago
  #20
Gear Head
Perhaps consider something second-hand, such as an old-school Yamaha FM PSR (some have drum pads and MIDI and limited synthesizer options).

Or if you want to go overkill, Yamaha PSR-9000 or 9000 Pro (arranger-style PSR keyboard loaded with options).

But if you want to go modern, you should have a look at Yamaha's and Casio's keyboard catalogues with her, and let her choose one that seems fun and that matches her and your wishes.
Old 1 week ago
  #21
Lives for gear
 
Rogue Ai's Avatar
I actually started my music journey playing around with the "DJ" minigame sequencer on the Game Boy Camera... hard to believe that was 22 years ago..
Old 1 week ago
  #22
Gear Addict
Moog One - 16 voice
Old 1 week ago
  #23
Lives for gear
 
desotoslo's Avatar
 

If you can afford it, get her a piano (or a good quality 88 key keyboard with weighted keys) and piano lessons from a fun and qualified teacher with successful and advanced students.

By the way, that is essentially what that website is suggesting with their top ten keyboards.

Give her the gift of music instead of just the gift of a physical object. She’ll thank you for the rest of your life with her love of music.

Signed, a piano teacher
Old 1 week ago
  #24
Sky
Lives for gear
 
Sky's Avatar
Is your daughter drawn more to perform or produce? If performing, then a low-cost stage piano with weighted keys may be best. If producing, then a versatile keyboard controller may be a better choice.

A friend recently started writing songs using only GarageBand on an iPad. Her first project is surprisingly good. The song itself is great and the recording is easily demo quality. I did a mastering pass to test the limits of the recorded tracks; we'll review it and explore how she can improve her recording techniques for her next song.

I recently discovered MainStage 3 and rather like it. My MainStage template combines the output from my stage piano with Velvet (Rhodes), Korg M1 AU and a few other plugs. Your daughter could explore using MainStage and GarageBand on a Mac, and graduate to Logic in a few years if she's motivated.

I'm a big fan of ear training and sight singing as part of learning basic music theory. This will give her a vocabulary for what she hears, which may help her learn covers and write songs. Again, if she really wants to learn to play piano, that's when more formal lessons may be important.


Sky
Old 1 week ago
  #25
Gear Head
ukulele
Old 6 days ago
  #26
Lives for gear
 
djwaxxy's Avatar
If she has a Nintendo ds you could get Korg ms10 that’s really good and cheap too.and I think they’ve released Korg gadget on Nintendo switch.
A cheap portable solution is the ik multimedia ikey pro it can hoook up to a iPad or computer and has some useful sounds and easy to use..it’s really cheap too and offers 37 full size keys which is a good size to start with.
Old 6 days ago
  #27
Lives for gear
 

korg microarranger..
Old 6 days ago
  #28
Lives for gear
 
grasspike's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr shifty View Post
Moog One - 16 voice
Great choice right there, and if are OK with used go for a Yamaha CS80 or if on more of a budget a Roland Jupiter 8
Old 5 days ago
  #29
M32
Lives for gear
 
M32's Avatar
I've read the words 'cheap casio' quite a few times here.
These days casio makes amazingly good digital piano's for the price.
I'd highly recommend the Casio Privia PX-S1000 to any beginner (about 500 euro's)

A cheap keyboard with some bleeps and bloops will only hold her attention for so long, and then it's just a throwaway piece of junk.

A decent digital piano will last her a long time if she decides to endure, and if not, you still have a decent digital piano, or she can use it when she's older and changes her mind.

most digital pianos have midi and/or usb out, so all you need is a cable to hook it up to a computer and use it as a controller.

btw if she decides to take piano lessons later, she'll be able to use this to practice. Learning piano on a cheap synth-action keyboard is not something i'd recommend
Old 5 days ago
  #30
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr shifty View Post
Moog One - 16 voice
It's a great way of smuggling one into the house.
📝 Reply
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
🖨️ Show Printable Version
✉️ Email this Page
🔍 Search thread
♾️ Similar Threads
🎙️ View mentioned gear
Forum Jump
Forum Jump