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Just bought a Jupiter 8, first thoughts.
Old 5th December 2019
  #1
Just bought a Jupiter 8, first thoughts.

I just bought a Jupiter 8. Spent the last week or so exploring it. Here's my thoughts: It aint all that, it is all that, both at the same time. It isn't worth the hype, though it is pretty great, but it is not on another plane from, nor ultimately better than, any of the other 'top tier' vintage analog polysynths.

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Here's the details. For years I'd wondered what jp8 really sound like. Is it on another plane sonically than the other vintage polysynths? I almost had one for 6k on an Ebay bid a few years ago, and I bid like 300 too little. Decided to take the plunge before prices got even more insane. I spent 10k. I sold basically all the pro-audio I had, cause I was like, synths are instruments, you can play get consistent joy from them, pro-audio is means to an end, and even then, the impact of a lot of it is far less than the synths for the music I make, and most of it isn't tripling in price before the eyes. I'm of course lucky to be able to spend this sort of crazy money, nothing purely for fun should cost this sort of cash.

For comparison, it sits in a room full of tough competition: Ob-x (4voice, midi), P5r2 (no midi), Arp Rhodes Chroma Expander, Oberheim Xpander, Trident Mk1 with midi, Prophet 600 gligli, Prophet VS, Minimoog (orig osc), Arp Odyssey Mk3, Roland SH-5, Oberheim SEM (orig), Maxikorg (with cv), Synergy Mk1, DX7IIfd, Yamaha Sk30, Eko Stradivarius, Elka 610, RS-202, and some quality vintage effects (ie: re-101, lex 224xl, etc.).

I've owned and sold the Obxa (dunno, just didn't gel with me sonically), MKS-80 rev 4 (great filter, but something about how the CEM oscillators were used made it somehow sound a bit sterile compared to other CEM synths I really like, on its own sounded sweet, but in a mix, too perfect), and Chroma Polaris (really like a lot about it, but there was a mid-range tone to it that didn't get with me somehow, not quite an eq thing, not sure). I briefly owned a p5rev3, before I knew what to really listen for, but if I knew what I know now, I prob would've kept it, as my memory is of it sounding 99 percent identical to rev 2, but didn't get to compare in person as I did with p4r2 and p600gligli. I don't have any experience to speak of with Memorymoog or Voyetra 8. Owned and sold polysix and Sh-2, both great but a bit limited.

Why jp8 is all that:


Many have said the jp8 interface is the best of any vintage synth, and that is without question true. Everything is as it should be and 'just works,' splits and layers with an easy knob to smoothly fade between these, arp, it's all great.

One great aspect is that there are just soooooo many tones and subtle variations and shades to be explored in simply making tiny shifts in balance between cutoff, resonance, filter env to cutoff, and keytrack.

The reason I think it is such a powerful synth is it covers more ground than likely any synth ever. The jp8 can be a chameleon, and I never imagined that. In one-to-one comparisons with Ob-x, Prophet 5 r2, and Trident, I can get the jp8 frighteningly close, 90 percent indistinguishable. When I first got it, I was worried it would throw some of my favorite toys out of the door, simply becuase 'it could do what they do'.

The 12db filter is the star of the show, and the jp8 can freakily imitate ob-x as much as p5. The p5 has a slightly unusual eq profile as synths go, and ob-x and trident can sound a tiny bit fuller than the jp8. But the differences are shockingly minor, and ever time I tried to come up with a sound made by these synths that the jp8 couldn't imitate, so long as the jp8 had the features (obviously can't do polymod), with enough tweaking, I could get the jp8 close enough to the other synth to an extent that maddened me. In theory, the jp8 could replace an entire battery of top-tier vintage analog.

The big reason why the jp8 is able to do this is that it's 12db and 24db filter are equally as great. Most synths only have one. The rare synth that has two, such as the Chroma or Ob-xa or Xpander, well, the 24db filter doesn't sound as good as the others. The Jp8 is stunning in either mode, sounding just as good as synths which have either as their only filter mode.

The warm pads are in fact as good as they are reputed to be on jp8. The envelopes are as fast and snappy as on any synth. Eight voices is a big deal. Having that on my Trident, it makes sounds with long releases easy and smooth and you can just play it and not worry about voice-stealing. It makes a huge difference. From my Obx4v and Prophet 5, I'm always feeling the need for more voices, this goes away on P600 gligli, six is the number of comfort for voices, but 8 is the best.

Why jp8 isn't all that:

Left to its own devices, jp8 has a sound, and that sound is 'happy' and 'bright'. This isn't to say if I don't let another synth lead the way (have the jp8 try to imitate a particular sound on the other synth), that the jp8 can't generally reproduce what it does in a scary close way, it can. BUT, when I program jp8 on its own, it's difficult to get it to sound too dark or haunting. It always sounds hi-fi, spacey, bright, cheery. It takes a lot of work to get the jp8 to do dark and creepy, especially in a way that is as good as other synths that do this easily. Dark and creepy is my go-to sound, though sometimes I do like sci-fi hi-fi spacey bright, but only sometimes.

Some say the jp8 sounds plastic, like a plugin/vst/softsynth. It doesn't, but I get where people who say that are coming from. The jp8 can sound 'too perfect', 'too smooth', and in a mix, more than any other vintage synth, its sound is more likely to be replaceable by a vst than others. Careful listening will reveal the difference of course. But sometimes its subtle. The resonance in particular is so sweet, that its more the low resonance sounds into the 12db filter that sound more dramatically non-soft-synthy. This isn't to say the resonance isn't glorious, it is! But it can blunt the impact of the discrete oscillator richness.

Comparing the discrete oscillators to oscillators on other synths, I can't say that discrete oscillators sound 'better' than chip oscillators like on the p5. P5 def is more drifty with its wonky tuning on the rev2, and as a whole p5 sounds a little warmer than jp8. Perhaps there's a little more harmonic variation through an oscillator's tone when its discrete, there's something slightly uniform about chip osc tone, but it's so minor, and equally as warm, that its more like choosing between two different types of pears, both tasty in their own way, not as different as one might think.

There are some strange oversights on the synth. The first is just an odd design choice, why is amp hardwired to osc 2 rather than 1? Ok, whatever, but while the second oscillator can be switched to an lfo, it really can't be routed to modulate anything. This is a huge oversight. The only use I can see for it is in cross mod sounds, but cross mod isn't that useful on a polysynth either. The ability to route oscillator 2, whether as lfo or vco, to FM vco1 or filter, would've really made this synth so much more powerful, it's an oversight. The fact that there's only one lfo total is also quite limiting, though at least it has several wave forms.

But playing it head to head with my lowly Prophet 600 gligli, is it 'that' much better?

I haven't given up my P600gligli for several reasons. Firstly, I suspect I might have a particular filter rev (not sure if there were multiple revs), but I had an earlier p600 in which the resonance screamed pretty unusuably more than halfway up, and this other one it is useful all the way up, dunno). Compared to my p5r2, the 600 has an extra voice, midi, always works, doesn't need multiple button presses to edit anything, has a ton more patch memory, and the extra gligli features extend its mod options a bit, and I really like the prophet sound more than likely any other.

I also keep the p600gligli as a sort of insurance. If I ever need to sell off most of my setup because of needing cash (ie: family emergency), I know I can do 90 percent of what I need with my p600gligli, some sort of moog monosynth, and a stringer, and its better to have that insurance in hand. I make as much money as a HS teacher, I just have few bills, so I've been able to put nearly all my cash (over housing, ramen and pizza dinner, and some very basic bills) into synths for the last five years or so, and I've gotten some incredible deals due to crazy persistence looking for them.

Back to sounds, when I try to get the p600 to imitate a sound on my p5r2, it can get there 95 percent. Left to its own devices, it has a slightly different sound, at times slightly more nasal or muddy. The fact that I can get the jp8 and p600gligli to imitate other synths with careful tweaking, but their own sound manifests more clearly when I program them on their own, leads me to think that the rangea and scaling of parameters differ subtly on synths more than base tone, and that especially differences in envelope curves make them 'tend' towards certain sweet spots more than others. When another synth leads, you can imitate its path through its parameter space more closely than in normal use. That said, it took me a while to get the jp8 to sound as good as the creepy horrorshow resonance sweep on my p600gligli. It eventually got there, but a bit of tweaking, while the p600 does it without even trying, one of its simple default sounds. Yes, I was trying to get the jp8 to sound as good as my p600gligli on a sound, and yes, it was difficult. I know the p600 at one point was limited, but not with the gligli mod. Today its damn great.

Lest anyone think I just have low standards for getting synths to 'sound like each other', let me say that in careful comparison of the reissue Oberheim SEM and Korg Arp Odyssey with the originals, I decided for the originals. I felt the filters were identicial or even smoother on the new units, but the oscillators a 'tiny' bit richer on the vintage units. So I'm rrrrrreally picky when it comes to sound. Comparing 'new analog polysynths' to vintage, I have yet to find one that I think compares, and I've spent a decent chunk of time with them.

It is worth saying that having them side by side, the Trident Mk1 (and likely Mk2 but I've got the Mk1 here) is a much more affordable way to get really close to a lot of jp8 tones, and many non-jupiter tones. The raw oscillator tone of the trident is ultimately my favorite on any analog synth. It's thick, chunky, rich, just great. The PWM on trident is my favorite on any synth, so chewy and full of character. One downside of Jp8 pwm is that it tends to either have too much square wave or volume dip at the end of its run, difficult to sit in the chewy sweet spot that the trident does efforlessly and I think better than any synth I've heard. So few say anything about the synth section on trident, but I'm a huuuuuuge fan. Having only one envelope is a non-issue, because there's some sort of scaling between how the env is applied to filter vs amp that makes that single envelope 'just work' for anything I've ever needed it to do. The Trident filter resonance, especially when used with filter keytracking, can get closer to jp8 filter sound than any filter I've heard on any other synth.

The raw oscillator tone of the jp8 is also quite similar to that on the trident, though the trident oscillator tone is ever so slightly bigger, thicker, and a smidge richer. The raw oscillator tone of the chroma is quite close to the jp8 too, though I think the jp8 oscillator is a tiny bit nicer. In 12db mode, the jp8 can sound similar in many ways to the Chroma, though the Chroma's modulations and especially dual peak filters make it completely unique.

Like the Xpander, the Chroma's filters make it able to produce sounds no other synth can touch, and while there is some overlap between the filter options of the Xpander and Chroma, there is far less overlap than one might think. The raw oscillator tone of the Xpander isn't great, so for 12db/24db lpf it's ok but nothing special, but all the other filters have a strong sonic signature that make the oscillator tone a non-issue, and give rise to sounds that are absolutely unique. Both Xpander and Chroma can be set for individual lfo speeds per voice, and this is a super nice feature for pads with a lot of movement.

Would I sell the jp8? Maybe oneday if I need cash. For now, will just record the heck out of it. My music focuses on what makes vintage synths unique, so I try to capture that extra 10 percent. In some sense, the jp8 and the p600 gligli could replace nearly all my synths. But in a pinch, the jp8 is more likely to go than some of the others. Go figure.

Overall:

Jp8 is so easy to use, and it always sounds great, if kinda happy and bright. When I had a friend over to hear it, I told him that it is no better or worse than any of the other 'top tier' analog synths, and he immediately agreed. Why is it often double or more the price? It's nice to look at, easy to use, never sounds bad, and it's got a huge breadth of tones, able to cover more ground than any other vintage polysynth. Better? naw. Cool, and kinda great? Sure. Don't get me wrong, the jp8 can sound huge, regal, glorious, refined, gorgeous, rich, lucious.

But this is worth repeating. The Obx, P5, Chroma, Trident are as good sounding as the Jp8. Same league of quality, period. Prophet 600 Gligli 98 percent in that category. They all sound a bit different. The Jp8 has the largest chameleon-like range, but it tends to the bright and happy sounding.

I won't be selling off the other vintage polysynths, no matter how close the jp8 can get to them. Ultimately, that extra 5-10 percent of uniqueness from an ob-x or trident is worth it more than a single synth. No matter how great a single synth, things will sound a bit more uniform if they're all coming from the same place.

Worth 10k? I got my Ob-x 4v and P5r2 for that total sum around 2 years ago. Today they'd total around 12k or more. But Jp8 is no better sounding than either, but it can do a frighetningly close imitation of either with its 24/12db filter.

Last edited by fromthepuggle; 6th December 2019 at 12:04 AM..
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Old 5th December 2019
  #2
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Thanks for sharing this!
Old 5th December 2019
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
I just bought a Jupiter 8
Your my hero.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
Why is it often double or more the price?
Reliability (real or perceived) compared to others probably has something to do with it.
Old 5th December 2019
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pppch's Avatar
 

Welcome to the club, what do you have for a midi in there ?
Old 5th December 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
The raw oscillator tone of the trident is ultimately my favorite on any analog synth. It's thick, chunky, rich, just great. The PWM on trident is my favorite on any synth, so chewy and full of character. .
Glad to hear someone else notice this. I am of the same opinion. imagine if it had the synth section upgraded to be in line with the JP8/P5/MM/OBX. It would possibly have been THE 5 oct analogue poly to beat. It is what ot is though, a majestical giant.

I am also of the same opinion on the JP. Its a very nice sounding synth. Enjoyed having one for a few years. Ultimately (IMHO) it wasn't the machine so many hype it up to be. Just another top tier synth. No better, no worse. There are sounds it does that can melt your heart (On Thomas Dolby's 'One of Our Submarines' and Kajagoogoo's 'Too Shy' are sounds that spring to mind. In no way is it a bad synth.

I remember some people getting really angry with me for saying this some time ago. Glad I'm not the only one of this opinion. <phew!>
Old 5th December 2019
  #6
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It will be interesting to see if your opinion shifts any over time. I guess it does depend to a large degree if its base sonics are what you'd reach for when starting a new track.

One thing you mentioned is important in comparing old and new -- the mid-range on the JP-8 is so perfect and that's where a lot of new analog falls down.
The JP-8 mid just sounds great and is not scooped or harsh. That probably helps give it the bright cheerful vibe without being fatiguing. Some of the newer analogs have an extended top end which in theory can be adjusted down by the filter, but that changes the overall tonal balance and exposes the mid-range differences.
Old 5th December 2019
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
Many have said the jp8 interface is the best of any vintage synth, and that is without question true. Everything is as it should be and 'just works,' splits and layers with an easy knob to smoothly fade between these, arp, it's all great.
One of the things I don't hear much talk about is the 'performance' section to the left of the keyboard. I absolutely love having the ability to switch the bender wheel to be VCF only without any menu diving, and adjust the amount it affects each VCO or VCF with the sliders. The rise time on the LFO modulation is a great control too. It's just so immediate. The only thing that would make the section better was if the modulation button was pressure sensitive.

When you go from that to 2 crappy plastic modwheel/pitchwheel combos of most synths, it's such a letdown.

Also, nothing prepares you for the sheer awe-inspiring sound of polyphonic glide across 8 voices.

I feel like the sound of a JP8 through the original Dimension D hardware is one of the most tear-inducing emotional sounds there is.
Old 5th December 2019
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basehead617 View Post

I feel like the sound of a JP8 through the original Dimension D hardware is one of the most tear-inducing emotional sounds there is.
which 80s pop song did not have a jp8?
As I've read, the song is more or less just jp8 with a linndrum


Old 6th December 2019
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by pppch View Post
Welcome to the club, what do you have for a midi in there ?
No midi. Hopefully with arp sync I won't need it much. Don't have midi on the p5r2 either. I'm a pretty accurate player, would be nice to do some midi sequencing of course, but not a big deal.
Old 6th December 2019
  #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by flat View Post
Glad to hear someone else notice this. I am of the same opinion. imagine if it had the synth section upgraded to be in line with the JP8/P5/MM/OBX. It would possibly have been THE 5 oct analogue poly to beat. It is what ot is though, a majestical giant.

I am also of the same opinion on the JP. Its a very nice sounding synth. Enjoyed having one for a few years. Ultimately (IMHO) it wasn't the machine so many hype it up to be. Just another top tier synth. No better, no worse. There are sounds it does that can melt your heart (On Thomas Dolby's 'One of Our Submarines' and Kajagoogoo's 'Too Shy' are sounds that spring to mind. In no way is it a bad synth.

I remember some people getting really angry with me for saying this some time ago. Glad I'm not the only one of this opinion. <phew!>
Trident synth section is wonderful. The pwm, wow. I was able to get the jp8 reeeeaaaally close, with a smidge less heft, but pretty indistinguishable. But that was going back and forth trying to get the jp8 to imitate trident. I would've never found that sound without the trident leading the way, and that's what I've found several times. But its a default sound on the trident.

Even in 24db mode, Jp8 filter is more usable than trident, from what I can tell, it loses bass and volume with resonance, but DAMN that happens really dramatically on the trident. Without keytracking I find resonance nearly unusuable on the trident, which isn't the case with the jp8, and I'm really into resonance. It's worth saying that while there's only one env on trident, it's as fast as any other hardware env.

But just the raw oscillator into the filter, no resonance, is gorgeous on trident. No strings (they're kinda dull), no brass (still haven't figured out what this section is good for), no flanger (gorgeous but one trick pony). Just that super limited synth section, just sounds good.

I'd say it would be the synth to be in terms of tone not only if it had more modulations, but a slightly less dramatic resonance.
Old 6th December 2019
  #11
So in a nutshell some synths just cost more because hype. Got it.

Back in the early 90s when everyone hated analog with a passion I faced the decision between a Juno 106 and the JP-8. The price wasn't very different between them at the time. I think the JP was $600 and the Juno was $400. I went with the Juno because it had a better Midi specifications.
Managed to get the store to knock another $50 off the price for a scratch on the rear they were obviously trying to hide.

A year later I picked up a P600 for even less than the Juno because I had begun to regret not buying a 2 osc synth. After that I never thought about JP-8 again. I had that Roland sound and I had a 2 osc sound. Plus I could layer the two and have something really special.
As time went by the Juno 106 started collecting dust after I dusted off my Juno 6. I'd built a trigger interface that took a snare sound from one of my R8's extra outputs and converted it to a clock trigger. That triggered the arp in the Juno 6 and with a digital delay it was instant Front 242.

At the end of the 90s I worked in Radon Basement in Bushwick Brooklyn. The owner was collecting every vintage synth he could find and what a collection it was. Naturally there was a JP-8. But it couldn't get my attention at all competing with the likes of an Oberheim 8 Voice and a Memory Moog.
Really trying to tear me away from the PPG 2.3 or the Steiner Parker Synthacon was practically impossible.

Anyway I've just never understood the wow factor of the JP. Even with all the synths in Radon Basement at my disposal I used the P600 more than the JP.
Old 6th December 2019
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
No midi. Hopefully with arp sync I won't need it much. Don't have midi on the p5r2 either. I'm a pretty accurate player, would be nice to do some midi sequencing of course, but not a big deal.
ok
I have equipped my with the Groove Electronics clone of Lintronics, is not bad, almost all parameters have CC.
of course not comparable with the jp6 europa
I still have an ESS note on off midi lying around if I'm getting sentimantal
Old 6th December 2019
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgearguy View Post
It will be interesting to see if your opinion shifts any over time. I guess it does depend to a large degree if its base sonics are what you'd reach for when starting a new track.

One thing you mentioned is important in comparing old and new -- the mid-range on the JP-8 is so perfect and that's where a lot of new analog falls down.
The JP-8 mid just sounds great and is not scooped or harsh. That probably helps give it the bright cheerful vibe without being fatiguing. Some of the newer analogs have an extended top end which in theory can be adjusted down by the filter, but that changes the overall tonal balance and exposes the mid-range differences.
I was wondering what you'd think of this, I was def thinking of your input on this as I was typing it up. Perfect mid-range. Hadn't thought of that, but makes sense. It has a very 'balanced' sound. Certain sounds have strong bass, but for the most part, not its strong suit, esp on sounds with resonance.

Hard to say at first what stays and what doesn't in the longer term. The sound of prophets are in general my favorite and standard, my go-to tone, and trident the most fun to just fire up and play. Chroma and Xpander just make the most unique sounds. Ob-x I've always had an ambivalent relation with, its 12db filter is a bit different from the others.

Will take time in recording sessions to really see which become mvp and which are more left to the side.
Old 6th December 2019
  #14
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It’s often said the Juno-6/60 offers a chunk of that “happy bright 80s” Roland sound for a lot less. Indeed it seems to have a lot in common in envelopes and filter, but also on the oscillator tone too. What do you think about this? Thanks for sharing your experiences.
Old 6th December 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by autoy View Post
It’s often said the Juno-6/60 offers a chunk of that “happy bright 80s” Roland sound for a lot less. Indeed it seems to have a lot in common in envelopes and filter, but also on the oscillator tone too. What do you think about this? Thanks for sharing your experiences.
I have the jp8 / 6 and the ju60 / mks7 can not confirm that. the junos are just too simplistic, and definitely have no system700 OSC.
what jp8 and ju have in common is the big sweetspot, the jp6 less.
Old 6th December 2019
  #16
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Dude, you're a dreamer. Actually, lately, I started to think that the JP8 is pretty underrated. The last one recently was sold for 25K on yahoo.jp btw
Old 6th December 2019
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post

Why is it often double or more the price?
It's all about the rainbow buttons.
Old 6th December 2019
  #18
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Similar opinion to the OP. I really am glad to have a JP8 in my rig and it’s definitely top shelf but the synth and the hype are two different things.
Old 6th December 2019
  #19
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The Jupiter 8 deserves to be high priced. Just look at how many cocaine habits it led to in the 80s. Seriously, this is the Miami Vice Ferrari of Synths.
Old 6th December 2019
  #20
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JP8 is my favorite synth of all time. I’ve had mine since 2013.

Some things to consider.

After a long time comparing it to my other synths, P600, OB8, Andromeda, J60 etc. there is an almost acoustic sound to it with the 12db filter, bright oscs and snappy envelopes. It sounds more real than any other synth. Not sure how else to explain it.

As for having one LFO... I often have up to 6 running on one 4 voice patch. You can layer two patches so there’s 2 right there. I use the 2nd osc for poly vibrato on both layers but set differently... that’s 4. Then the amp and filter can each accept a CV input from my System 100m LFOs.

You can also throw a VCO into the filter CV for poly filter FM. Or into the amp for almost ring mod type sounds. It’s unipolar so AM really, but still interesting results.

In my opinion the sound is better than OBs and Prophets... but that of course is subjective.

The real reason the JP8 is worth 2-3x the other classics is the combo of reliability, amazing style/design, classic sound (much better than any CEM which is most 80s polys), best UI ever, relative light weight/size (thinking CS-80 etc) and the modern features like arp, split and layering, presets, poly glide, 8 voices, mine has midi, and pro connections like stereo XLR.

To me it’s the perfect balance of that top tier sound, perfect design and modern features.

My only real desire would be env to cross mod. But that’s pretty nit picky.
Old 6th December 2019
  #21
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Sorry, I was never that impressed with the Jupiter 8 and it's definitely not worth $10,000. As the saying goes, a fool and his money are soon parted.
Old 6th December 2019
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Well, in just programmering the heck out of the plugin version of Arturia i get all what is said here. The range of tones, the variety of sweetspots, even the acoustic sounds... great synth.
That together with the layering and detuning of the oscillators and layers against each other combined with PWM and crossmod really makes some special sounds.
So i guess the real version must sound even more glorious.

Since it always sounds a bit brighter and snappier it fits easily in a mix with its great midrange sound.

I am a fan.
If Behringer clones it to a tee it will be mine for sure.
Old 6th December 2019
  #23
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I will never understand the ridiculous prices these things trade for, it's absolutely silly imo.
Old 6th December 2019
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I wouldn't pay more than 1.500€ for one, besides the wow factor of looking at one in person, the sound is not for me.

I agree with the "bright and happy" character, the complete opposite of a MKS-70 or a JX-8P (completely underrated btw). The Jupiter 8 is just an investment, it's not about the sound anymore.
Old 6th December 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromthepuggle View Post
I was wondering what you'd think of this, I was def thinking of your input on this as I was typing it up. Perfect mid-range. Hadn't thought of that, but makes sense. It has a very 'balanced' sound. Certain sounds have strong bass, but for the most part, not its strong suit, esp on sounds with resonance.

Hard to say at first what stays and what doesn't in the longer term. The sound of prophets are in general my favorite and standard, my go-to tone, and trident the most fun to just fire up and play. Chroma and Xpander just make the most unique sounds. Ob-x I've always had an ambivalent relation with, its 12db filter is a bit different from the others.

Will take time in recording sessions to really see which become mvp and which are more left to the side.
At any given time across the past 25 years or so, I've had between one and four Jupiter-8's sitting here. The only synths I've had for longer are the MiniMoog and PPG. I happen to like the sound of the JP-8 and have set up a 2 octave arpeggiation, pressed 'Hold' and let it bubble away in the background for a couple hours while I made cables or worked on repairing a synth.

However, that's me and what I like. Not everyone likes what I like.

Your comment about trying to make synth A sound like synth B is actually very important. What it says is that a good synth programmer can get very close to their goal with any number of machines. However, if you are fortunate enough to have choices, you don't have to spend the time and energy doing the extra work to get the sound you want.

Fact is, in this day and age, music has become a one person effort. You compose, play, record, mix, master, and market and it's just you doing all that. I think what happens is that we unconsciously collect tools that make some parts of that process easier and faster so we can focus on other aspects.
So - Kordbot, NDLR, or any number of sw apps to generate chords and melodies; a DAW instead of mixing console and multi-track tape machine, etc.

When you're working on a track, you are going to reach for a machine that can get the sound you want as quickly and painlessly as possible so you can continue to focus on the composition and mix. It's not wrong to choose a real Lexicon 224 versus setting up a plugin chain if the 224 gets you the exact effect you want instantly.

The difficult thing is to set aside the labels of rare/iconic/collectible when choosing what to use. If these classics are sitting around powered up and working, there's an urge to use them, even if they don't exactly fit the task at hand.


As a final comment -- if the Chroma had a knobby front panel and full sweeping control of resonance, it would be the synth people would be paying insane amounts of money for rather than a CS-80 or JP-8 or whatever.
Old 6th December 2019
  #26
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by pppch View Post
which 80s pop song did not have a jp8?
As I've read, the song is more or less just jp8 with a linndrum


Sounds like a real drummer, bells and guitars to me.
Old 6th December 2019
  #27
Lives for gear
 
Marzzz's Avatar
The JP8 is all over Roxy Music’s Avalon, which is one of my favorite albums of all time. The pads and atmosphere of that album are just gorgeous...right now I have to be satisfied with DIVA (and I will be taking a close look at the Jupiter Xm), but if Behringer does clone the JP8 I may not be able to resist. Thanks for the write up!
Old 6th December 2019
  #28
Lives for gear
 
pppch's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poumtschak View Post
Sounds like a real drummer, bells and guitars to me.
“I had just purchased a Roland Jupiter 8 keyboard,” recalled Kelly. “We used the Jupiter 8 to create the main keyboard and bass tracks. For the drum track, we used an old Linn drum computer. We demoed the song quickly, and kept it simple. I sang the falsetto in a Smokey-style voice, then we added some background vocal parts.”

https://www.songwriteruniverse.com/virgin.htm
Old 6th December 2019
  #29
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by pppch View Post
https://www.songwriteruniverse.com/virgin.htm
Quote:
"When the song was written, Kelly & Steinberg recorded a simple, keyboard-based, eight-track demo at Kelly’s home studio."
The Jupiter 8 may have made it to the final track, IDK.
But this is no Linndrum for sure.

Anyways, don't want to hijack the thread.
Old 6th December 2019
  #30
Lives for gear
 
pppch's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poumtschak View Post
The Jupiter 8 may have made it to the final track, IDK.
But this is no Linndrum for sure.

Anyways, don't want to hijack the thread.
easy I was not there, probably they were so cocacola...that they forgot ...
for further questions please contact Billy Steinberg & Tom Kelly

If I hear the song, it's certainly the jp8 for me, and the lines are also easy to readmake
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