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Is it counterproductive to buy multiple synths at once?
Old 12th July 2019
  #1
Lives for gear
 
rids's Avatar
 

Is it counterproductive to buy multiple synths at once?

Alright, I haven't posting in these parts much recently because I'm trying to be more productive in the studio. As with a lot of posts here, this is somewhat of a therapy seeking thread. I'm actually not a big fan of these types of threads, but will offer my experience and advice when I see someone that looks to be honestly in need. GAS happens and I've bought synths in the past that I haven't used as much as I should since I bought it in the first place. I think most people would agree they feel like they neglect gear if they buy something and don't give it much use.

So on to the real question of the thread. Is buying 3 or more synths at one time counterproductive? Or is it a necessary evil to find the synth you are looking for? Even though GAS is real, and I can easily allow myself to get to that point, I am of the belief that trying synths/gear for yourself is the best and sometimes only way to know if a synth is for you even if other people like that one or not. So by buying multiple synths at once, you speed up the process of finding the synth you are looking for. Of course, that's the justification, but it has merit. The downside is that while buying multiple synths at once, you might decide to put the other synths away for a rainy day instead of resell it, thus Mt. Gearmore accumulation continues. And you have synths sitting there waiting to be explored, but you somehow lose interest once you have it. It's like the hunt for the synth is hard enough and once you have it, you relax and get lazy.

Buying multiple synths, picking the ones you like, and selling the ones you don't wouldn't be a problem if you aren't like me and don't like to pack up and ship crap. That's the hassle I don't like. I could have those ebay stores do it for me or whatever, but then I'd lose money and I'm not into that, but I suppose maybe it's relatively a small price to pay.

The other issue letting go of a synth even though you haven't explored it enough to justify the purchase in the first place. I'm trying to get perspective from you guys on how to view this. There's a slight guilt or fearful laziness (not wanting to dive into a synth).

Maybe as part of this thread, it wouldn't be a bad idea to hear from people that have bought, sold and rebought gear. I say that because I feel like once I sell a synth, I'm not going to buy it back. And come to think of it, I never have, but then again I'm a hoarder so there's that. It's hard to let go of synths because there's a reason you bought it in the first place. It's harder to come to the conclusion that you don't want to use the synth anymore. As with everything in life, it's hard to let something go. Definite hoarder comment there.

But forcing yourself to sell something seems to be the way I sell stuff as I rarely buy something on purpose and then say it sucks, wanting to sell it. There are a ton of synths I want to try out there, but I feel like I need a gameplay, like make some sort of rule that I must sell something. Maybe give myself a limit of having a certain number of synths maximum. But then again, this sounds bizarre to me too because I don't like to limit things as sometimes it's part of the process. And sometimes, on the other hand, the process you are using is all jacked up because you don't know how to manage your productivity / gear-accumulation balance.
Old 12th July 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
 
NEXUS-6's Avatar
 

Life is short spend your money the way you want to...

That being said at one point in time you realize that an analog synth is an analog synth and a digital synth is digital.
In other words a lot of what we fall for is marketing hype.

They all do the same thing just in a different way..

Is the new gizmo better than the old gizmo? I dont know but its a new color and has blue lights and silver knobs and a cool screen!!
And it must sound better because its new right??

If you want to spend you life fetishisizing the newest wiz bang thingamajig feel free to do so.
Old 12th July 2019
  #3
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Coorec's Avatar
When i started using synths nearly 30 years ago i didnt know about diferent ideas and technolgies.

I found that lerning the synth you have (it doesnt matter which one) is more important than havin many synths.

To this day i am able to program better "analog" sounds on my XP50 than many of my friends on a Sub37.
Old 12th July 2019
  #4
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Lady Gaia's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coorec View Post
I found that lerning the synth you have (it doesnt matter which one) is more important than havin many synths.
This is a statement I can get behind 100%. Getting to know an instrument inside out will teach you more about what matters to you. Kicking the tires on a dozen synths is definitely fun, but not particularly educational.
Old 12th July 2019
  #5
Here for the gear
 

There is nothing inherently wrong with buying multiple synths at the same time. Like you say, you can get different flavours of sound and UI experience by doing this.

Just consider:
- You're likely to spend less time with each and not know them as well.
- You'll end up with favoured ones while others sit collecting dust.
- The more you have the more cables and larger interface you will want and more time spent faffing.
- Buy second hand so you don't lose out if you sell some on.
- It can be a distraction from actually writing music.
- Most of the time, the sounds themselves are only a small part of what makes a good track. Most of what makes a good track is arrangement and mix. The quality of the sound, particularly the "analogness" is only really going to be noticed on specific types of music.
- If you find yourself "searching" for the right synth, unless it's trying to get a very specific sound like a 303, it may be a sign that you are struggling to figure out how to "construct" the music you want to make. I spent a long time buying/selling synths and I still have a lot and it's great fun and a good learning experience. But.. now, for the type of music I want to make (techno mostly), I have figured out that I can actually take just about any VST synth and some drum samples and can fairly quickly put together something that sounds good. Most of what makes it sound good is the arrangement of the sounds, mixing to make space, and fx chains to develop the sounds. The original source is often just a starting point and source of inspiration.

I would generally only recommend hardware if:
a) you want a small unit to perform improvised live
b) you simply don't want a computer in your setup at all.
c) you want a unique workflow to inspire ideas
d) keyboard synth player in a band

I highly recommend before buying a hardware synth to buy a midi controller like the APC40 which, if you are using ableton, maps it's 8 knobs to the macro devices automatically allowing very easy to manipulate synth/fx. Map a few key controls of your vst synth and add some interesting fx afterwards, then start recording what you play and wiggle knobs. The resulting audio can be a fantastic source of inspiration.

The other really useful thing to do it to try to make a whole track from a single sample! Pick something with a wide freq range, like a big snare or thick buzzy bass note. You'll need to cut it up, and mess around with it in all sorts of interesting ways. It a good way to figure out how far you can push your stock plugins and arrangement techniques.

You might discover you didn't need that synth after all..
Old 12th July 2019
  #6
Gear Head
 
Demure's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Gaia View Post
This is a statement I can get behind 100%. Getting to know an instrument inside out will teach you more about what matters to you. Kicking the tires on a dozen synths is definitely fun, but not particularly educational.
+1, couldn't agree more.

Whenever I buy more than one synth in a 2/3 month period, I feel my attention is split between the two and don't get nearly as deep as I'd want to. The longer I spent with a new synth before acquiring any new gear, the deeper I dive.
Old 12th July 2019
  #7
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Demure View Post
+1, couldn't agree more.

Whenever I buy more than one synth in a 2/3 month period, I feel my attention is split between the two and don't get nearly as deep as I'd want to. The longer I spent with a new synth before acquiring any new gear, the deeper I dive.
I suppose the counter argument is that you don't want to spend 2/3 months learning a synth that you don't gel with. If you get 2 or 3, you can identify the one you like the most and sell the other 2. Time box some time with each, make a decision and move on.

In Eurorack, people always say, start slow with a couple of modules and then get more as you need to. The problem is that you don't really know what half the modules do at the beginning and its actually hard to know what to start with or what to buy next. So my advice is actually to just buy a medium size selection of cheap second hand modules to get a good flavour of how they work and what they all do. Then sell what you don't use or stick in the drawer for later on.

Obviously cost is a major factor but if you buy used and look after them it can be managed well.
Old 12th July 2019
  #8
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Sapro's Avatar
I have bought and sold many synths over the years. I am lucky in that i know what i want and what suits my workflow so turnover is a lot lower nowadays BUT the only way you can really get to know a synth is to use it. If you have multiple new instruments at once you cannot dedicate enough time and brain space to any of them. If you don't know a bit of kit you really don't know if it works for you.
Old 12th July 2019
  #9
Gear Nut
 

Counterproductive? Maybe, maybe not.

Personally, I'd definitely call it crass materialism sinking even lower. What's next? Buy 5 cars at a time just so i can figure out what I'd rather drive? But my thoughts don't really matter do they?

You do you.
Old 12th July 2019
  #10
Lives for gear
 

I think it depends a lot if you're buying new or used.
If you buy new, you're spending more money and only have a very limited time (usually 30 days) to try the instruments before the return period expires. So it's quite likely that before you really had a chance to learn the instrument, you will have to take a not-so-informed decision to return it or not.
In my opinion, that's a waste either way. Either you keep a synth that you may not like, spending a lot of money (and which will devalue a lot when resold), or you have to hastily return a synth without knowing if it may be the right one for you.

If you buy used it's a different matter. You spend less and you will be able to resell it more or less at the same price, so there's no economical pressure for quickly taking a decision. Furthermore, you don't have to worry anymore about return/warranty period, so you can afford to just put it under the bed for weeks-months-years until you find the time to really dive deep into it.


But beyond these considerations, our time is limited. Learning to program a synth inside and out takes lots of time. Heck, even a simple minimoog has quirks and tricks that you can explore for a lifetime. So I totally agree with the others who said that it's better to learn one synth so well that you can make the most out of it, rather than pile up stuff that you don't know how to use.
Of course, some synths will "gel" with you almost immediately, while with others you will instantly know they're not for you. That's fine.
But when you find some intriguing instrument that stimulates your creativity and curiosity, just focus on that and forget GAS (and gearslutz)!
Old 12th July 2019
  #11
Ksp
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not entirely counterproductive but the downsides ive seen in many others and myself is you get overloaded with gear , dont work on one thing for long enough and really learn it and how to work it and then what happens is Gas feeds in and you sell stuff you did not give a chance as your unable to allow enough time for all the gear.

No matter what there is a lot to be said for less and working stuff properly and limited setups , feature sets and so on.

The big downside i found when i bought a few synths at once is some got neglected and none of them really got used properly as i was like a kid in a sweet shop but who quickly was spoilt and that leads to lower appreciation of stuff and then weird **** happens with the mind and ' sell to buy more ' kicks in
Old 12th July 2019
  #12
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Synth Buddha's Avatar
Everyone is different, of course, but yeah, I don't think it's a great idea to buy more than one synth at a time. But I also think it's an absolutely insane idea to constantly be on the lookout for new gear. So what I do is try to limit my gear hunting and purchases to slots of a few weeks or so, as best I can, and then have at the very least a few months where I don't think about buying anything new at all unless something comes up and I have to get something (usually a utility thing or a sample library - like right now I need to upgrade some things inside my main computer), or my classifieds-addicted friend notifies me about having seen something for sale that he knows I have been looking for - a fairly rare occurrence, but it happens. And sometimes, ahem, there's also an AdSense ad for a software sale and I get suckered in haha...


But anyway, that means that I usually buy a bunch of stuff at a time. Synths, outboard, software - whatever. I just don't start using it all as soon as I get it. I test items if needed (synths especially are often bought used, and occasionally a seller "forgets" to mention that "uhm, yes, those particular buttons don't work" etc ), put them in the storage room, and then take one piece out at a time, often to my place upstairs if it's an instrument, and spend some real time with it before I get one of the other things out. I pretty much always do it this way because I've learned from my mistakes buying too many things at a time some 15 years ago and ending up with a bunch of stuff I hardly knew how to use, which just sucks a big one. So I made another rule for myself and I've become rather good at following it.

I have the synths I need and haven't been buying any new ones for a while now, instead I sold some off, but I did upgrade both the Arturia V-Collection and NI Komplete recently, and also got a few other software things, mostly for processing but also Arturia Pigments on a whim (thanks to this very forum). And I follow the same rule with those things. Right now I'm focusing on some other stuff, so I only played around with Massive X for like an hour or so on the day I got it (I was too curious not to download it), and it will sit there unused until I have the time / focus to get into it. The processing plugins are fairly quick to learn for the most part, but I usually start out with one at a time with those too. There's just about zero use in having a bunch of different EQs if you don't know them very well. The demo period is often all I really need to learn those things sufficiently to start working with them, though.

And aaaayway, while we're talking about gear and more gear and how much gear etc etc etc: Like I said, I recently sold off a bunch of stuff, and I'm right now toying with the idea of getting rid of even more. Like a lot of people, I've experienced first hand the creativity booster it can be to slim down your set up, and I've kinda been doing that artificially for years by taking everything that was not in use out of the studio and into the storage room down the hall. For me, basically, if I'm not planning to use something for a while, I don't want to even see it. But I think it would have been even better to have a storage room on the other side of town, or in nearby town for that matter, because when you have everything so close there is still the option to whip it out and use it, and that option is often the enemy. I also lend away gear quite a lot, just like I borrow things at times, and that has been even more useful. Because that item is usually out of reach when lent away. And only occasionally have I gone "GRRRR, I wish I hadn't lent away that synth now!!§"§" Instead it usually feels good to not have the option to get it out when I suddenly think it's what I need.

Limitations have always been beneficial (but mostly so, for me at least, during the writing process). Artists of all kinds have always been aware of this, of course, and in recent years we've also had some research to help us better understand why this is so. But then some of us still keep piling on more gear anyway. So purges are sometimes in order. And I've come to the conclusion that the best thing, at least with instruments, can be to get rid of a little bit more than you're fully comfortable with. Sure, that obviously depends greatly on what you're doing and what you're working with, but while less is often more, even a little less than that can be what is actually best. YMMV, though, obviously.

I should probably admit, though, ahem, that what set off my latest gear purge wasn't so much my conscious choice but the fact that I lost my reasonably sized storage room and now have to make do with more of a "storage closet." And there is no way I was going to keep a big bunch of currently unused synths and samplers etc in here. Besides, I've had a fairly lean couple of years in terms of income, so putting a wee bit of money back in the bank didn't hurt. But I still reap the benefits of the purge, no matter what actually brought it on. The gear got listed in the classifieds and now it's gone. And that's been all good - I haven't missed one single thing so far. I never do.

I just make sure to follow another important rule: Don't sell your tube gear!
Old 12th July 2019
  #13
Deleted c985153
Guest
Yeah I flip a lot of gear and it takes up a lot more time than just sticking with one or a few pieces that I know really well. I'm not in any particular hurry though...

I did the same thing years ago with basses/ guitars and some other instruments. I spent a lot of money and a lot of time getting to know the instruments and setting them up in various ways, but that definitely detracted from actually writing and playing music. In the end though, I wound up with a set of instruments that I really connected with and found the strong points for each.

I guess the way I see it is that there is no real right or wrong answer, as others have said, just what works best for you. It can be tough, because I find that it takes me months to really figure out if I actually gel with an instrument or not in most cases. But yeah just do your thing, as long as it's not ruining your life somehow, then the way that works for you is best.
Old 12th July 2019
  #14
Gear Head
 
Demure's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by orbita View Post
I suppose the counter argument is that you don't want to spend 2/3 months learning a synth that you don't gel with. If you get 2 or 3, you can identify the one you like the most and sell the other 2. Time box some time with each, make a decision and move on.

In Eurorack, people always say, start slow with a couple of modules and then get more as you need to. The problem is that you don't really know what half the modules do at the beginning and its actually hard to know what to start with or what to buy next. So my advice is actually to just buy a medium size selection of cheap second hand modules to get a good flavour of how they work and what they all do. Then sell what you don't use or stick in the drawer for later on.

Obviously cost is a major factor but if you buy used and look after them it can be managed well.
From my experience whatever I like the most immediately isn't equal to what I like the most in the long run. Some synths are good at giving immediate appreciation, some only start to shine once you've learned how to program it to sound like you want them to. I stick with synths I like long-term, not short-term. Whatever gells with me short-term is often not much of an indication. I personally cannot check 2-3 synths at the same time at the level I feel like I need to to know if it's a good fit.
Old 12th July 2019
  #15
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B_and_W's Avatar
 

Why do we have jobs? So we can make money! What do we do with money? We spend it! I'll be receiving a Yamaha CS2x and a Korg Poly800. I got them both for a low price. I still will get a Korg M1, Roland D50 with an extra mod which I'll install myself, Roland JV-50. If you have the space, just get them at once because you'll get them at some point. I love reading the owner manuals of my synths, I still haven't figured everything out but I'm really enjoying it. Hell if I put the effort like how I'm doing now with these manuals back when I was still a student I would be a professor by now. But the thing you can do if you get multiple synths at the same time is see how they blend together by actually making some music.

I don't have that I'm looking for the perfect synth issue. You could basically make any synth workout for you if you did some research about the synth. If I'm into 80s disco music production I won't get a modern digital synth but either a vintage analog synth or a modern analog synth since they have that 80s-ish sound.

I had bought a reel to reel recorder, I always wanted to buy one but I was looking for a sequencer I accidentally found this reel to reel recorder which was in a perfect shape so I got that one instead. Servicing and fixing electronics makes my d*ck hard, so just an another excuse to buy something.

Will I get more synths? HELL YEAH! I'll buy almost every clone Behringer is going to clone and a few other analog poly synths like the Summit and Baloran. BUT when it comes to producing music you must keep everything simple. The composition is the most important factor of a song, if your composition sucks the entire track will suck it doesn't matter how many synths you have or how expensive the synth is.

I'm into Italo Disco I know what synths I need and which ones I need to buy, but for Euro Dance I have to get digital synths from the 90s. There is a plenty of information about the synths they used in this genre, but you could make any synth work for this kind of music IMHO.
Old 12th July 2019
  #16
Lives for gear
 

If you buy a fair amount of complicated devices in a short period of time, I don’t know how you’d ever become proficient in any of them. And some people seem to have a habit of buying a lot of cheap things because they can rather than buy a really nice thing that they actually want.


And there are a lot of times where the nuances between different synthesizers are really overemphasized..if you know what you are doing odds are pretty good you can approximate a lot of sounds with one good synth, don’t really need a Moog for bass, or a Roland for pads, etc...

Sometimes sales and FOMO are a motivating factor in unreasonable buying. But I’ll let you in on a few tips...if you are buying new mass made gear...90% of the time you can just get the same deal any day of the year, not just right now. Unless it’s a close out sale and it’s being discontinued. Super niche small run boutique stuff...you may have to get now if you think you need it...that stuff is volatile to disappear for long periods of time or forever. Never buy software outside of peak sale period, and usually don’t buy it upon launch either....it’s not uncommon to see some things for 60-75% off in 6 weeks-months. Used gear...if it’s an impossibly good deal..well yeah odds are good that someone else is looking at it, so if you think you need it and you have the money..
Old 13th July 2019
  #17
WDM
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WDM's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rids View Post
So on to the real question of the thread. Is buying 3 or more synths at one time counterproductive?
[/B]
i think it is. The "homework" needs to be done. You don't need to buy them all to try them all out there. Pick the one, try it .. learn it, then decide what's missing what you need.

Over the years you will collect multiple synths anyway, but at least it wound't be impulse buys...

I'd like to mention also, that it's not only synths you should choose.... speakers, preamps, pedals, plugins, mixers, cables... the list goes on... it's all the same story, so don't rush, put some time into research before you buy new things, and make sure you learn new stuff good, before switching to another or replacing it.
Old 13th July 2019
  #18
Lives for gear
 

I’ve said it here before, and I will undoubtedly say it many more times: the hidden cost of any gear is the time required to use it well. There’s no reason not to buy a few things in one go if your finances allow it, but it’s very easy to check out some demos and read some things and think “having X, Y, and Z will totally take me to the place I want” only to get those things and become overwhelmed or only partially learn how to use one decently and the others barely at all because the excitement fades once you have to hook it up and learn it.

I’m definitely guilty of it, especially with eurorack (like I know I’m going to buy this kinda boring but essential thing like a VCA but I want something more interesting as well, so I end up ordering an osc and FX module), but also with whole synths. I recently barely missed out on the killer deal from Sweetwater on the Pro 2, gig bag, and eurorack module...so in my frustration found another synth on my “someday” list for a price I couldn’t let pass, the Roland V-Synth, and then found a good deal on a demo Moog Grandmother which scratched the itch for semi-modular, and then found another retailer selling the Pro 2 for even less than the deal I found sans the extras, and had to hop on that...consequently I have three new (to me) synths purchased over the course of a few weeks, and none have gotten the attention they truly deserve yet because I’m still simultaneously learning them as well as continually trying to improve with the things I already had.

I say buy what you want, but just keep in mind that it’s not worth anything if you can’t use it capably. That doesn’t just mean knowing how to use it based on what the manual says, but knowing how to use it in ways that the manufacturer wouldn’t have imagined. That takes some time, and every new piece of kit is going to expand the amount of time required as you try to find the ideal combination of things for your art.
Old 13th July 2019
  #19
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grasspike's Avatar
If you know what and why you want certain synths and you are able to get them at a good price or if they are rare and are suddenly available why wouldn't you buy 3 or more at once?

You might never get the chance to get them again
Old 13th July 2019
  #20
in my experience - yes. all things considered, it is counterproductive.


whenever i have done it, one of the boards took more of my attention and focus and other was on backburner for anything btwn 3 months to (gasp) 2 years. i am not talking quick fun tweaking and jamming, but really getting to know the machine and its sonic character in all variations and its best applications. these things take time, thru experience, working on tracks and arrangements. not just understanding the front panel.


it was even worse when i got bunch of cheap 90s digital stuff. bcs of bargain i went on a spree. some of these i got on with rather quick, others that were even remotely complex with cryptic UI i slowly forgot about. they gathered dust, and some i finally sold. sad and pointless. now if i went one by one, and figuring best way to edit them, moved my lazy as s to get an ipad editor or whatever... i might have used them in a much more fruitful way. but when you get four of them simultaneously ... yeah, you steer towards quicker gratification.


@ grasspike : i agree, this is why i bought crapload of vintages at once many years ago, i knew they will never be as cheap again. but still for cpl of years that followed i felt consequencesas i described above. it was overkill, and i actively used to full force just a cpl of them. this changed later of course, and i am grateful to have them now.
Old 13th July 2019
  #21
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Moonwhistle's Avatar
 

Learning synths is overrated. Stacking them is not, what's to learn anyway they all do the same thing.
Old 13th July 2019
  #22
Lives for gear
I bought a bunch of synths but not all at one time. 90% of them I bought second hand and some of those need repairs. I’ve been buying them since 1998 and my rule is “never sell”. Over that 20 year period I have accumulated way more than I can ever learn but I’m comfortable with that. I work in IT and it’s fairly demanding so I don’t have a lot of spare time for music at the moment. I’m planning on retiring in the next few years and I’m gonna wallow in these synths until they no longer work or I no longer work. There is something about the sound of a synthesiser that makes me feel resolved. I plan to explore this until I die.
Old 13th July 2019
  #23
Gear Guru
 
zerocrossing's Avatar
What works for me is that I do two buying “sprees” per year. One in December and one in April. I’ll spend most of my time in between just using what I have, though, of course, I come across things here that I’m interested in, and sometimes I’ll get to some point of frustration with something that spurs me on to replace it. Doing it in specific times only makes me bypass any impulse buys. I’m usually pretty sold on something by the time I get it. At Christmas I got a Dominion 1 and a Prophet 12. The Dominion was a replacement for a Bass Station 2, and the 12 a replacement for a Tempest. Not that I didn’t really like the BS2 and Tempest, but I’m really enjoying having a poly pressure equipped controller, so why not exploit it? The Dominion was to get more VCO muscle in my studio, and more capabilities. I took to them both immediately. I honestly don’t understand the “you don’t know a synth until you’ve had it for a year” thing. A month is plenty. April I got a Peak and a Microfreak. I got the Microfreak in a few days, but it took a solid month to get the Peak. Mostly because I was expecting something else and I had to shift my idea of what it’s place would be.

So... no worries buying a few synths at a time. I’d just keep it down to two or three.
Old 13th July 2019
  #24
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Coorec's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Gaia View Post
Getting to know an instrument inside out will teach you more about what matters to you.
Exactly. Finding the "right" synth for your needs is a result of that process, not its starting point.

But GS would only have half the amount of threads if everyone could muster the necessary patience and diligence to follow that principle.
Old 13th July 2019
  #25
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Xero's Avatar
i mean...yeah.

there's a few times now where i've bought a ton of stuff at once. I mean I think the majority of my stuff I bought over like a 1-2 year period, then slowed down dramatically. I think I was most productive towards the beginning of that, when I bought stuff that I immediately put to use.

Once I started buying "upgrades" or making things redundant, then yeah, it stopped being a productivity booster.

pretty much doing anything but the thing you're trying to do, is unproductive, lol.

so if you're trying to make music, then going on GS and looking on gear sites so that you can buy multiple things at once, is not going to help with that

but yeah, finding "that magical deal" is often a good reason to break this rule. it's easy enough to lie to yourself about that one though lmfao
Old 13th July 2019
  #26
Lives for gear
 

When Kraftwerk bought a Synclavier....

(2:30)

Old 13th July 2019
  #27
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonwhistle View Post
Learning synths is overrated. Stacking them is not, what's to learn anyway they all do the same thing.
that is true of some synths with open interface but not of some with deep menus and deep functions and functions that when learned mean you can create very unique sounds of your own.

whats to learn i guess depends on how much brain you have or how much you want complexity or how much your mentally functioning

yeah all synths sounds the same , whats to learn , whata dickhead.
Old 13th July 2019
  #28
Gear Guru
 
zerocrossing's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by leaf studios View Post
that is true of some synths with open interface but not of some with deep menus and deep functions and functions that when learned mean you can create very unique sounds of your own.

whats to learn i guess depends on how much brain you have or how much you want complexity or how much your mentally functioning

yeah all synths sounds the same , whats to learn , whata dickhead.
Why is everyone so mean lately? In case it wasn’t obvious, Moonwhistle was being sarcastic.

That said, 80% of synths are just not that complex. I think a mistake many people make when they start out is they try to learn each synth, instead of learning each possible function. Once you have a good understanding of what all the components do, learning a new synth is simple, even if the synth is somewhat complex.

What sometimes takes more time for me, is getting to know the character of a synth. What are it’s strengths and weaknesses? What are the wavetables like? That can take time, but I enjoy that, so it doesn’t feel like a chore.
Old 13th July 2019
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonwhistle View Post
Learning synths is overrated. Stacking them is not, what's to learn anyway they all do the same thing.
This is basically how I operated for many years with Reason. Just stack the right presets, sprinkle with effects, and the gold records were flying out the door (in my head as I fell asleep narcissistically listening to my epic masterpieces)
Old 13th July 2019
  #30
WDM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grasspike View Post
If you know what and why you want certain synths and you are able to get them at a good price or if they are rare and are suddenly available why wouldn't you buy 3 or more at once?

You might never get the chance to get them again
That's what I've done with Boutiques.
But that purpose is entirely different from OP.

OP wants to find a perfect synth for him.

Boutiques will never be perfect for me (due to its size, limitations, etc).
But in that case, I know exactly what and why... and I'd like to be perfect within those limitations.
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