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Has anyone sequenced with an emulation of an Atari 1040ST? Drum Machines & Samplers
Old 4 days ago
  #61
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by leaf studios View Post
Between bad jitter on external synths and wanky Envelopes on soft synths i think the world of dance music in particular went very pete tong.
ok... but somehow I disagree that was the reason for the pete tonging.

I think it had more to do with big egos and idiots who jumped in merely for the ego & money rewards while having no vibe, soul or connection to the underground roots and to what this scene is about.

It's like everything else... as soon as something fresh becomes popular, out comes a soul-less commercial imitation which is what you get if you don't know where to look.

There's armies of these guys making club fodder using just a computer, ready made sample loops and a bunch of plugins. It's music-by-numbers which is why "EDM" sucks so bad. Most of these guys never experienced the real thing.

Back to topic, I used an Atari back in the day and I don't think it has any magic sauce or mojo. It sucked TBH and I wish I had looked into more hardware sequencers.
Old 4 days ago
  #62
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treebase DMX View Post
Back to topic, I used an Atari back in the day and I don't think it has any magic sauce or mojo. It sucked TBH and I wish I had looked into more hardware sequencers.
yeh wasn't really my thing, sitting in front of an arrangement,
and i wanted the right hardware sequencer.

but there are interesting things to do with atari and cubase.
there's less to learn and look at than now, for a start.
if you use groups, you can start to work in a way that resembles
patterns; you have alternate arrangements within a song, that
can be useful: start again, and still have the other one to refer
to.. and especially doing takes using just the numerical keypad
to run the transport: you can have one person flowing with the
inspiration, bashing in the parts, and another hitting the transport
operations, just using the numerical keys - make loads of parts
really quickly and capture stuff.
the ips is a wonky arpeggiator thing, but you can record the midi
from it..
i originally kept mine because they weren't worth what i'd paid, and
i could run editors on it - then i got an atari to vga cable so it could
use a TFT screen and realised it was worth holding onto, silent
dedicated midi sequencer computer. haven't really used it though.
Old 4 days ago
  #63
Gear Maniac
 

Ahh, the things I have that will be useful to me someday. My grandmother had big tins full of buttons and what not...

Quote:
Originally Posted by babylonpanic View Post
yeh wasn't really my thing, sitting in front of an arrangement,
and i wanted the right hardware sequencer.

but there are interesting things to do with atari and cubase.
there's less to learn and look at than now, for a start.
if you use groups, you can start to work in a way that resembles
patterns; you have alternate arrangements within a song, that
can be useful: start again, and still have the other one to refer
to.. and especially doing takes using just the numerical keypad
to run the transport: you can have one person flowing with the
inspiration, bashing in the parts, and another hitting the transport
operations, just using the numerical keys - make loads of parts
really quickly and capture stuff.
the ips is a wonky arpeggiator thing, but you can record the midi
from it..
i originally kept mine because they weren't worth what i'd paid, and
i could run editors on it - then i got an atari to vga cable so it could
use a TFT screen and realised it was worth holding onto, silent
dedicated midi sequencer computer. haven't really used it though.
Old 4 days ago
  #64
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustAnybody View Post
Ahh, the things I have that will be useful to me someday. My grandmother had big tins full of buttons and what not...
maybe, but at the time it didn't mean i was going to sell it for peanuts.

Last edited by babylonpanic; 3 days ago at 10:26 AM..
Old 4 days ago
  #65
Lives for gear
 
enossified's Avatar
If the idea is to run a TOS sequencer like Cubase on an Arduino, the obvious issue is the user interface. How are you going to deal with a mouse driven GUI designed for a 12" display? I must be missing something here.
Old 4 days ago
  #66
Gear Addict
 
umptanum's Avatar
 

The OP should really give Expert Sleepers a chance. Once you dial it in it's absolutely rock-solid. Yes the USAMO unit is finicky and it can be a bit of a pain to find that tiny sweet spot where it works (and this can change from synth to synth) but it's worth the patience. It's certainly better than falling back to older DAWs.

I have both the USAMO and their modular units (the ES-40 and ESX-MIDI Expander). The modular units with the SPDIF don't have the fine tuning the USAMO requires... it just works and you get 8 MIDI ports to play with. You only need a small Eurorack case/powersupply to go with it, like the Doepfer A-100 small case.

As far as being finicky about MIDI input, I dunno. If that's the case, perhaps look at a sequencer like a Yamaha RS7000.

From what I understand, Windows machines are generally terrible with MIDI jitter since Windows doesn't timestamp MIDI data and so the MIDI gets randomly sorted during clock cycles, while Apple is better since their OS does timestamp. But how I see it, everyone who is making music is pretty happy/successful with just using Apple... the music industry isn't collectively losing their minds over MIDI jitter. Perhaps maybe get a low-cost iPad/iphone with some MIDI sequencing app and have that sort things out?

But for bulletproof MIDI output to your synths, the Expert Sleepers route does work.

Last edited by umptanum; 4 days ago at 11:34 PM..
Old 3 days ago
  #67
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by babylonpanic View Post
yeh wasn't really my thing, sitting in front of an arrangement,
and i wanted the right hardware sequencer.

but there are interesting things to do with atari and cubase.
there's less to learn and look at than now, for a start.
if you use groups, you can start to work in a way that resembles
patterns; you have alternate arrangements within a song, that
can be useful: start again, and still have the other one to refer
to.. and especially doing takes using just the numerical keypad
to run the transport
: you can have one person flowing with the
inspiration, bashing in the parts, and another hitting the transport
operations, just using the numerical keys - make loads of parts
really quickly and capture stuff.
the ips is a wonky arpeggiator thing, but you can record the midi
from it..
i originally kept mine because they weren't worth what i'd paid, and
i could run editors on it - then i got an atari to vga cable so it could
use a TFT screen and realised it was worth holding onto, silent
dedicated midi sequencer computer. haven't really used it though.

user input timing a big plus with workflow

I could not imagine not using a querty to sequence.
you want to do something its there at the touch of a key.

touch screens, menu diving. pissing around with a mouse. more modern but really not good (quick).


from the top...
space. 1. enter.

bang bang bang.

repeat that. ctrl K

doing the mundane stuff is not where you want to waste your time imo

Last edited by Preston135; 3 days ago at 12:12 PM..
Old 3 days ago
  #68
Lives for gear
 
Acid Mitch's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by umptanum View Post
The OP should really give Expert Sleepers a chance. Once you dial it in it's absolutely rock-solid. Yes the USAMO unit is finicky and it can be a bit of a pain to find that tiny sweet spot where it works (and this can change from synth to synth) but it's worth the patience. It's certainly better than falling back to older DAWs.
What soundcard and daw software do you use USAMO with ?
I use it with an RME multiface and Samplitude pro x3. I have quite a large sweetspot where it works and it’s completely non finicky to dial in. Works with all synths on the same setting.

Last edited by Acid Mitch; 3 days ago at 12:53 PM..
Old 3 days ago
  #69
Gear Maniac
 

No Atari for me, I use my Psion Series 3a for when the info is only for me. I imagine that there are a few grans out there with an Atari stashed in the loft.

Quote:
Originally Posted by babylonpanic View Post
maybe, but at the time it didn't mean i was going to sell it for peanuts.
Old 3 days ago
  #70
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Preston135 View Post
user input timing a big plus with workflow

I could not imagine not using a querty to sequence.
you want to do something its there at the touch of a key.

touch screens, menu diving. pissing around with a mouse. more modern but really not good (quick).


from the top...
space. 1. enter.

bang bang bang.

repeat that. ctrl K

doing the mundane stuff is not where you want to waste your time imo
yeah, this was just because i'd figured out i could arm record,
run, stop, go back to top, with just the 10 number buttons in
the right hand corner. is it ctrl+p or something to create a
new part? ctrl+t for a track? was a long time ago.

as i got a rm1x through the post 2 days ago, i'm not even going
to think about that now. totally brilliant (large) device.
Old 3 days ago
  #71
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by babylonpanic View Post
yeah, this was just because i'd figured out i could arm record,
run, stop, go back to top, with just the 10 number buttons in
the right hand corner. is it ctrl+p or something to create a
new part? ctrl+t for a track? was a long time ago.

as i got a rm1x through the post 2 days ago, i'm not even going
to think about that now. totally brilliant (large) device.
ctrl+t 1 * enter

yes you can create a track arm it and play your synth over the top of the sequence within a few seconds.

use mute groups on the desk to unbusy the track to just play over the rhythm.
save you having to midi mute (which can be a bit of a faff about).

I've tried working with more modern stuff but I just don't get that immediate responsiveness.

the more responsive the tools are, the less likely you are to loose the train of thought in the music/sound

Last edited by Preston135; 3 days ago at 01:58 PM..
Old 1 day ago
  #72
Gear Addict
 
umptanum's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acid Mitch View Post
What soundcard and daw software do you use USAMO with ?
I use it with an RME multiface and Samplitude pro x3. I have quite a large sweetspot where it works and it’s completely non finicky to dial in. Works with all synths on the same setting.
I had an old Delta 1010 when I first got the USAMO. Now I use a Focusrite Scarlett 18i20. I do have to say that the sweet spot isn't an issue really anymore, but I remember it being a pain with the Delta. I just wanted to acknowledge the OP that yes, the USAMO can be a bit finicky to dial in... but it seems it could be related to the audio interface.
Old 1 day ago
  #73
Lives for gear
 
enossified's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthpark View Post
The sloppiness comes from the fact that midi is transmitted with audio buffer chunk.
No, the sloppiness is because only the Atari has MIDI integrated into the OS. Other OSes don't have the sort of real time support needed to get tighter timing, even with the insanely faster processors today.
Old 1 day ago
  #74
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by enossified View Post
No, the sloppiness is because only the Atari has MIDI integrated into the OS. Other OSes don't have the sort of real time support needed to get tighter timing, even with the insanely faster processors today.
This is not true.
The problem is the OS. You can bypass the OS on an atari. So all of the OS garbage doesn't interfere with you timing. It's the same with an amiga. You can also do really well on a Dos machine.

I have no idea what the other poster meant by Midi being transferred with the audio buffer chunks. Certainly not all sequencers do that.
Old 20 hours ago
  #75
Gear Head
 
CZ Rider's Avatar
 

To answer the OP, I have been able to run STEEM on a PC with OK results. The MIDI is no where near as tight as on the Atari. And as mentioned any dongle software does not work with STEEM. I have experienced hicckups in timing the Atari would never do. However it is a great way to try the Atari with little investment. Also not bad to work with both as WIN files can be read on the Atari.

There are some really nice upgrades to the old Atari that make it less a PITA to use and navigate as it was in the past. Currently running an STE with 4 MEGs of RAM, and a few upgrades.

A huge improvement is an optical mouse via a 9 pin to USB adapter. The original STM-1 mouse was a brick. Also an UltraSatin drive that not only adds Gigs of storage via two SD cards. It also has a clock for the date. Needs a TSR program as the Atari was not Y2K complaint to keep the file dates correct. But once setup it all works flawlessly. No more swapping 720K floppies. Also have the Unitor 2 that adds three extra MIDI ports out and SMPTE.

I built my own monitor converter using an original 13 pin cable, a few resistors and a 15 pin VGA. The original B&W monitor was bulky and had a small screen. Any cheap 4:3 type monitor should be a huge improvement.


With so many unique music programs the Atari still has potential. I did scour the net to find some of the books for some of the more interesting and deep programs. Like Ludwig, KCS, and Tunesmith. The online tutorials only scratch the surface of the many options in these programs.


It is amazing the ammount of quality programs they packed into a small folppy, compared to today's bloatware. And programs like KCS can run at extreem clock settings from 1 BPM to 999. My Atari is part of my studio and it is very handy to have a dedicated MIDI computer . Looks modern next to the old 60's Moog?
Old 19 hours ago
  #76
Lives for gear
 

and as ever, a big hello to Mike Hunter
Old 15 hours ago
  #77
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BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
i used an atari 1040-STe in the studio, professionally, every day in the 80s and early 90s.

today i have a Mac pro 12 core and cubase 10.

functionally no difference when sequencing.

except the resolution on the atari was 96 beats per 1/4 note. very very low by modern standards.

i used notator on atari, and cubase 2 and 3.

cubase 10 is so much better....

Buddha
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