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The ultimate high-end reverb for synths- Eventide, Lexicon, or Bricasti?
Old 14th October 2018
  #1
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Quantum7's Avatar
The ultimate high-end reverb for synths- Eventide, Lexicon, or Bricasti?

I'm thinking of buying a high-end reverb unit for my synths in the coming months and was looking at offerings by Bricasti, Eventide, and Lexicon. I would also use it for vocals, strings, etc., but was just wondering what some of you are using for the ultimate high-end synth reverb experience.
Old 14th October 2018
  #2
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I'd go for a Lexicon PCM 81 and an Eventide H8000FW (with Eve/Net) if you want the "best".
Bricasti is great too by the looks of things - I don't own one though so can't comment too much.
The H9000 could be a better alternative to the H8000 but the latter is probably cheaper and still sounds incredible.

I've been on the hunt for a PCM 81 for ages. Own an H8000FW and H3000 D/SE as well as the Oto machines BAM, Strymon Flint and a few euro reverbs (namely ErbeVerb and Halls of Valhalla). Collectively they more than cover my reverb needs.

Delays, well, that's another story!
Old 14th October 2018
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drxcm View Post
I'd go for a Lexicon PCM 81 and an Eventide H8000FW (with Eve/Net) if you want the "best".
Bricasti is great too by the looks of things - I don't own one though so can't comment too much.
The H9000 could be a better alternative to the H8000 but the latter is probably cheaper and still sounds incredible.

I've been on the hunt for a PCM 81 for ages. Own an H8000FW and H3000 D/SE as well as the Oto machines BAM, Strymon Flint and a few euro reverbs (namely ErbeVerb and Halls of Valhalla). Collectively they more than cover my reverb needs.

Delays, well, that's another story!
Hey, there is a Lexicon PCM81 on EBay if you are still looking for one.
Old 14th October 2018
  #4
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I have a Bricasti in my commercial studio, haven't had the highest end Lexicons but had a PCM91 and still have a PCM70 and likewise haven't had the high end Eventide's but have a Space pedal.

The Bricasti is amazing but it really is a realistic reverb, no shimmer, ethereal modulated tails etc. At emulating real spaces it is the best reverb I have ever heard.

The Lexicons are lovely, not really realistic in general but make everything you put through them sound better! They are flattering verbs for sure.

The Space pedal is very cool for ambient and experimental but I don't think a great deal of the emulations of real spaces.

I have all 3 covered in the box at my home studio with the Seventh Heaven Bricasti emulation, Lexicon PCM bundle and Eventide Blackhole which cover all the reverb I will ever need.
Old 14th October 2018
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum7 View Post
Hey, there is a Lexicon PCM81 on EBay if you are still looking for one.
Saw that - trying to find one in 'excellent' condition
Old 14th October 2018
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum7 View Post
I'm thinking of buying a high-end reverb unit for my synths in the coming months and was looking at offerings by Bricasti, Eventide, and Lexicon. I would also use it for vocals, strings, etc., but was just wondering what some of you are using for the ultimate high-end synth reverb experience.
Not to argue with your interest in a high-end reverb unit, or to hi jack your thread, but I was wondering: how frequently (if any) somebody listening to a finished, fully produced track, thought or said "that was a ****ty reverb unit they used !!!"

Also, look at the Alesis Midiverb II: for a long time it was considered crappy low end, but now these days it is valued and sought after by "connoisseurs" ....
Old 14th October 2018
  #7
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I have been investigating the same matter the last years as well.
I have owned most of the TC hardware reverbs, including M2000,M3000 and Reverb 4000. Now I have the algorithms in TDM versions including NonLin, VSS3 and DVR2. However I was thinking about buying a Lexicon 480L or a Bricasti.
However as already said the Bricasti is more about real spaces and not larger than life reverbs with chorus on the tails and the 480L is not my taste for some reasons as it doesn´t have that chorus on the tails either except on one algorithm, the random hall so the more I looked the more I started to realize it was the older Lexicon 224 I was after. THE Vangelis reverb to put it simple...
In the meantime I bought the TC 6000 inspired software reverb from Relab and the 480L inspired from the same company but was not overwhelmed. I also had the 224 plugin for my UAD-2 but still I missed that magic sparkle. Also AVID Revibe has a vintage algorithm which sound very close to the 224 if you tweak the settings a bit.
However...still not finding a real 224 and I started to hesitate if I dared to buy such old digital technology in hardware. So I tried the Native Instruments 224 emulation without much hope as it was not expensive at all...the RC24...bang...there it was, exactly what I was looking for. Very nice early reflections with a reverbtail with depth and width and glorious chorus movement at the same time! Just one important thing to know, you have to use the stereo in and stereo out version. If you use mono in stereo out the early reflections and the depth will be completely different even if you just send a signal in dead center into it, don´t know why but the difference is everything. Give it a try. Fantastic on synths.
Komplete : Effects : Reverb Classics | Products
Old 14th October 2018
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by time_zone View Post
Also, look at the Alesis Midiverb II: for a long time it was considered crappy low end, but now these days it is valued and sought after by "connoisseurs" ....
I actually owned one back in the day...and never cared for it. It would be interesting though to try one again one day.
Old 14th October 2018
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firechild View Post
I have been investigating the same matter the last years as well.
I have owned most of the TC hardware reverbs, including M2000,M3000 and Reverb 4000. Now I have the algorithms in TDM versions including NonLin, VSS3 and DVR2. However I was thinking about buying a Lexicon 480L or a Bricasti.
However as already said the Bricasti is more about real spaces and not larger than life reverbs with chorus on the tails and the 480L is not my taste for some reasons as it doesn´t have that chorus on the tails either except on one algorithm, the random hall so the more I looked the more I started to realize it was the older Lexicon 224 I was after. THE Vangelis reverb to put it simple...
In the meantime I bought the TC 6000 inspired software reverb from Relab and the 480L inspired from the same company but was not overwhelmed. I also had the 224 plugin for my UAD-2 but still I missed that magic sparkle. Also AVID Revibe has a vintage algorithm which sound very close to the 224 if you tweak the settings a bit.
However...still not finding a real 224 and I started to hesitate if I dared to buy such old digital technology in hardware. So I tried the Native Instruments 224 emulation without much hope as it was not expensive at all...the RC24...bang...there it was, exactly what I was looking for. Very nice early reflections with a reverbtail with depth and width and glorious chorus movement at the same time! Just one important thing to know, you have to use the stereo in and stereo out version. If you use mono in stereo out the early reflections and the depth will be completely different even if you just send a signal in dead center into it, don´t know why but the difference is everything. Give it a try. Fantastic on synths.
Komplete : Effects : Reverb Classics | Products
Thanks, I will check those out.
Old 14th October 2018
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TornadoTed View Post
I have a Bricasti in my commercial studio, haven't had the highest end Lexicons but had a PCM91 and still have a PCM70 and likewise haven't had the high end Eventide's but have a Space pedal.

The Bricasti is amazing but it really is a realistic reverb, no shimmer, ethereal modulated tails etc. At emulating real spaces it is the best reverb I have ever heard.

The Lexicons are lovely, not really realistic in general but make everything you put through them sound better! They are flattering verbs for sure.

The Space pedal is very cool for ambient and experimental but I don't think a great deal of the emulations of real spaces.

I have all 3 covered in the box at my home studio with the Seventh Heaven Bricasti emulation, Lexicon PCM bundle and Eventide Blackhole which cover all the reverb I will ever need.
What it your opinion of SeventhHeaven vs. the Bricasti?
Old 14th October 2018
  #11
OTO machines BAM
Old 14th October 2018
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by time_zone View Post
how frequently (if any) somebody listening to a finished, fully produced track, thought or said "that was a ****ty reverb unit they used !!!"
I actually did that once (at least I noticed a really WOW! reverb, but didn't really wonder about the unit they used), and that was the beginning of Madonna's "Frozen".

Cheers,
Bert
Old 14th October 2018
  #13
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I would hunt for a Lexicon 200 if you want that 224 experience at a fraction of the cost. Wonderful sound and hands-on parameter tweaking. I agree the pcm80 is also very good as a multieffects machine.
Old 14th October 2018
  #14
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Reverbs are like synths in that there are a lot of different flavours. One box doesn't do it all. And although there are plenty of great reverb plugins nowadays, I prefer to get my sounds as I want to hear them before even turning on the computer. There was a time not so long back that it seemed there wasn't that much choice in terms on new reverb units. The newer Lexicons didn't really have the magic of the older models. The Bricasti does very real sounding spaces, but doesn't have that otherworldly lusciousness I was looking for. That left the Eventide Eclipse v4 (the H8000 was both end of life and too expensive for my budget). I really liked the Eclipse, very deep and flexible, but it didn't offer that classic Vangelis Bladerunner ambient reverb wash that I was looking for. I was seriously considering finding an old Lexicon unit, but really didn't want the reliability hassles that would come with such an old piece of kit. I got a Strymon BigSky, partially based on the hype, and found that, while it can sound great, it still wasn't entirely satisfying, especially in terms of seamlessly blending with the source sound. Enter the OTO BAM. The first thing I tried that really gives me the sound I was looking for, absolutely superb for those lush yet grainy classic reverbs.

So, I'd recommend an Eclipse for flexibility and deep programmability, with a side order of OTO BAM for classic verbs. The H9000 is out now, so if you've got the budget, get that instead of the Eclipse.
Old 14th October 2018
  #15
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Edit: I am not related with that company.
Old 14th October 2018
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UWAIN View Post


Edit: I am not related with that company.
What a cool device. Sounds great on the shorter settings.
Old 14th October 2018
  #17
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I always like a Lexicon PCM close by when tracking and/or mixing... a 70, 80/81, and/or 92/96. The 81 is my fav all rounder, with multi fx and incredibly deep modulation capabilities, easy editing and stellar sonics. I actually have 3 of them, one for each rig. Each of those have a companion Eventide, one Orville and two H3000 D/SE’s. The two H3000’s have a companion Ensoniq, a DP/4 and DP/4+, while the Orville is grouped with the (new-ish) Bricasti M7, a PCM-92, two PCM-70’s and a PCM-42.

I wish I could shed more light (or more sonic characterizations) on the Bricasti and synyhs, but it’s a recent purchase for the studio CR (garage conversion) and isn’t setup in my temp synth rig, which has an 81 and D/SE (although the latter needs repairs :(. I envision its use more for vocals, acoustic guitar, other acoustic instruments, percussion and just about anything I want to put in a realistic, 3-dimensional space - along with combining and layering it with other reverbs and fx.

Damn, I’m beyond impatient to get my new home studio setup completed.

Old 14th October 2018
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by string6theory View Post
Damn, I’m beyond impatient to get my new home studio setup completed.

Make sure and post plenty of photos here on GS when you get it all setup.
Old 14th October 2018
  #19
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Quantum7's Avatar
Does anyone here have an Eventide Reverb 2016 Stereo Reverb Processor, or a Lexicon PCM96?
Old 14th October 2018
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum7 View Post
Does anyone here have an Eventide Reverb 2016 Stereo Reverb Processor?
Only tried the plugin, great for room sounds, not so good for longer reverbs, or character reverbs. Wouldn't be my first choice for synths.
Old 14th October 2018
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum7 View Post
Does anyone here have an Eventide Reverb 2016 Stereo Reverb Processor, or a Lexicon PCM96?
The PCM-92 is the stereo version of the 96 and has identical presets and algos. The 96 had a lot of issues with its FireWire implementation and lack of resolution, along with a much higher price. 92 is a much better value imo. Sounds absolutely lovely. It has a velvety platinum gold face with big knobs made for easy tweaking. This is rich and lush Lex, dense as desired, albeit more modern / refined sounding than the earlier models. Definitely nice to have in the verb toolbox.
Old 14th October 2018
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by time_zone View Post
Not to argue with your interest in a high-end reverb unit, or to hi jack your thread, but I was wondering: how frequently (if any) somebody listening to a finished, fully produced track, thought or said "that was a ****ty reverb unit they used !!!"

Also, look at the Alesis Midiverb II: for a long time it was considered crappy low end, but now these days it is valued and sought after by "connoisseurs" ....
One of the first thing I noticed about the new Aphex EP is how amazing the reverbs sound though.

I’ve always been a kind of a fan of low end ‘verbs (or maybe it’s some kinda denial because they’re all I can afford) - but now I’m starting to change my mind. So I can sound like Aphex.
Old 14th October 2018
  #23
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I'll post some more direct exeperiences with all these reverbs (and more) later today, but in the meantime, member @ fromthepuggle (and others) have asked similar questions.
Take a read through some of these:

Lexicon 224
must have effects
ursa major
quantec qrs
more reverb
outstanding reverb

Last edited by oldgearguy; 14th October 2018 at 04:50 PM..
Old 14th October 2018
  #24
must be most recurring topic on gearslutz electronic . along some recommendations, i'll repost some examples from the last one.



PCM81 with dual fx card

fantastic on synths and guitars, uber flexible
trademark lexicon algos for random and concert hall, chamber
multitap delays in reverb engine and separate delays
modulation in reverb path, as well as after the reverb cho/fla/pitch
full midi control of all parameters for real time change
excels at both vast/ambient stuff as well as "normal" spaces like chamber,room etc

example: Quad>Hall (4 detuned taps into random hall into touch of chorus):

pcm81 on prophet vs


Eventide DSP7000 (1/2 of Orville)

like with 81, the reverb you hear ain't just "reverb", its a complex combo of multitap, reverb, pitch shift in the reverbs feedback path, and post modulation to achieve that final vast/ambient/eeire/spooky result. of course you also get metric ton of all other possible complex algorithms for modulations, pitch shifting, delays, filtering etc.

alternatively if you want similar but without the algo editor, and less dsp, you might look at Eclipse. Space also sounds wonderful with modulated trails, and hands on editing with pots is priceless. i use it along Orville no sweat.

example: Mercury Cloud (multitap cluster into slowly pitch shifted reverb):

mercurycloud on andromeda



that said overall my favorite vintage reverb is Lexicon 300. i do use it for synths and background textures, but i love it mostly giving the larger than life trail to forefront acoustic elements (real or kontakt) like violin, piano, harp. practically every track i do has 300, Orvile and TC 4000 covering realistic, unmodulated spaces.



224 and PCM70 do have unmistakeably early vintage character. more lofi warmer fuzzier etc. i was lucky to get a refurbished 224X and it does have those mesmerizing vangelis trails, and the famous constant density plate, but indeed they can be a maintenance risk if not in good shape. that said, i would definitely give 70 a look, for fraction of the money, even if they are far from the same thing. recently i found this wonderful example on youtube showing how asolutely stunning it can sound on a simple synth






basically instead of getting one "ultimate" unit like 224 or Orville, 8000 etc, id rather recommend going for several units that cost much less, for example pcm 81 +pcm70 + DSP7000. basically i dont find any of the high ender "ultimate" offering all i need in a single box. i would always want to have an Eventide of sorts, a 90s Lexicon and a early 80s Lexicon, in any scenario.
Old 14th October 2018
  #25
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FlyingMusician's Avatar
I have a PCM 70, 81, 91 and an H3000. While each have great reverbs, they are different so it's a matter of taste. But keep in mind, any will do the job.

The 70's older converters have a very clear hi freq roll off that you cannot replicate with a modern reverb using EQ. There is something magical that only those old converters do. The 81 has a rich full frequency reverb with a load of great effects (pitch, chorus, etc.) as a bonus. The 91 is a dedicated reverb unit, very modern, clear, smooth. Then there is the H3000, which is completely different to the Lexicons but it's closer to the 70 in tone, in that it also has that vintage high frequency roll off. It's a less complex sounding than the Lexicons.

If you had to choose one, my brain says PCM 81 but my heart says PCM 70.
Old 14th October 2018
  #26
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over the past 30+ years, I've been fortunate enough to own pretty much all the classic reverbs made. EMT 251, Lex 480L, 224, 200, PCM 70, PCM 92, Quantec QRS, Kurzweil KSP-8, Yamaha Rev 5, Rev 7, Eventide SP-2016, H3000, H8000, H9000, Publison IM-90, Bricasti M7, Roland R-880, AKG ADR 68k, AMS RMX-16, as well as a bunch of 'next tier' reverbs. About the only brand I haven't delved into is the high end TC Electronics ones.

minimal sound discussion now - there's lot of subjective info presented so far. This is more focused on the practical side of things.

If you're into "that tone at any cost", then seriously look at picking up a Quantec QRS or EMT 251. Some of the most beautiful sounding machines made ever. Then add another classic reverb to them for more ethereal effects.

If you want vintage and don't mind sending a unit out from time to time, the Lexicon 480L or Eventide SP-2016 (original not the Princeton version) can be serviced in the US by some amazing folks in Cleveland, Ohio.

It's hard to recommend the AMS or Publison no matter how great they are due to the eventual service(s) they will need and the costs associated with that servicing.

A lot of older reverbs (like the PCM 70 or Publison IM-90) are mono in, stereo out if that matters, so check on that. I like them because they only take up one effects send on the mixer.

In addition, a lot of older units can only run one algorithm/preset at a time if that matters. The Lexicon 480L can run 2 in parallel or series, same with the Eventide H8000. The Bricasti is a stereo unit and only runs one thing at a time. The H9000 allows up to 16 algorithms to be running at the same time in a variety of configurations.

The Eventides (with the H9000 the exception) are starting to get along in years (see the rough timeline here) and I've seen reports on their forums that doing things like repairing/replacing the H8000 screens is becoming very difficult.

If you're mainly a 'start with the presets and then tweak' kind of person, the H8000 has a ton of excellent starting points and the front panel is very usable for small tweaks. Same with the Lexicon 480L and Bricasti. The single space Lexicons are IMHO tough to edit for long periods of time. The Bricasti doesn't have 100's of parameters, so it's pretty quick to scroll to the one you want and change things. Same with the Publison IM-90 and RMX 16. Deep dive programming needs some type of software editor for most of the modern effects units.

I generally liked the sound of the PCM 80/81 but found editing them from the front panel to be very tedious, so I rarely edited them and ended up selling them despite the great sound. Same with the PCM-70. If you're leaning towards the newer PCM-92, I'd advice just buying the plug-in from them instead even though I'm a hardware kind of guy.

Some units offer remotes, so where you typically do your editing can come into play. The Bricasti can be purchased with a remote and front panel or a blank panel+remote (or just the full panel no remote obviously). The H8000 remote is *extremely* useful and I probably would have sold off my H8000's much earlier if I didn't have it. The Lex 480L needs the remote of course. Same with the 224. There is a very useful remote for the Publison IM-90, but that's very hard to find.

If recall/DAW integration is important, that narrows down the field considerably. You'll have to research that for the newer products.

Speaking of newer, you can actually try out the Bricasti, Eventide H7600, 8000, and Lexicon PCM 92 from places like Sweetwater (of course used prices are a bit more reasonable).

The Bricasti and H9000 are the only ones still undergoing new development. The Bricasti v2 update added some more modulations and different variations on their signature sound. V3 has been in the works for a while and will end up being a motherboard swap, but Casey is thinking that update will be blowing people away for years to come. Of course, buying now means buying it for what it does today. The H9000 team is just gearing up for new stuff. Their earlier work was focused on porting and bug fixing of their existing algorithms to the new platform. Moving forward, the plan is a lot more new algorithms that take advantage of the significantly increased horsepower.

So - decide what's important to you from the practical side - DAW integration, multiple algorithms in parallel, multiple ins/outs/ease of editing/maintenance and reliability and then look at what your options are after narrowing down the field.

Real gross sound generalization summaries -

close to ideal vintage clean reverb sound = Quantec, EMT
modern beautiful reverb = Bricasti
reverb + any synth for ambient = Eventide H9000 (and family)
classic moving/full/euphonic reverb = Lexicon 480L, 224, 224X, 300
Dark horse amazing reverb plus classic fx = Eventide SP-2016
Reverbs I love but would hesitate to buy now = Publison IM-90 and AMS RMX16

What's still in my rack? Bricasti M7 (x2), Lex 480L, Publison IM-90 (x2), Eventide H9000, MIDIverb II (haven't actually been using it much - picked it up on a whim because I used to own one many many years ago).

Last edited by oldgearguy; 15th October 2018 at 10:39 AM.. Reason: forgot the 9000
Old 14th October 2018
  #27
Very good advice from oldgearguy (as always). Still, as someone who owned an Eventide Orville and Space, I personally like the H3000 sound much better than the modern Eventides. That said, it is of course a matter of taste as someone above also mentioned, and the modern Eventides are also very good (especially compared to modern Lexicons IMO)

I also have a Lexicon 300 which is awesome for that luxurious old Lexicon sound while still being relatively cheapish.

Anyway, despite having the Lex 300 and H3000 I must say that the OTO BAM is just as good for less than half the price and it being new + build as a tank does mean it is more future proof also. If you're prepared to spend over a 1000 or even several 1000s for a classic machine why not buy a BAM (if only as an extra)? You can't go wrong with that one.
Old 14th October 2018
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nodog View Post
Very good advice from oldgearguy (as always). Still, as someone who owned an Eventide Orville and Space, I personally like the H3000 sound much better than the modern Eventides. That said, it is of course a matter of taste as someone above also mentioned, and the modern Eventides are also very good (especially compared to modern Lexicons IMO)

I also have a Lexicon 300 which is awesome for that luxurious old Lexicon sound while still being relatively cheapish.

Anyway, despite having the Lex 300 and H3000 I must say that the OTO BAM is just as good for less than half the price and it being new + build as a tank does mean it is more future proof also. If you're prepared to spend over a 1000 or even several 1000s for a classic machine why not buy a BAM (if only as an extra)? You can't go wrong with that one.
That's one important thing - the answer is more than one reverb since there's no one single reverb that works for all situations/sources. Having a couple options means you can quickly pair up the right effect with the source and not spend a half hour editing something to get it to maybe kind of fit.

I'd like to hear from @ clusterchord and others with some history of vintage effects+synths on something I've noticed --

some gear seems to just sound better through one manufacturer's reverb versus others. A couple examples here - the H9000 and 480L don't really seem to add a lot to the Fizmo output, but the Bricasti just gives it a particular shine and space that works really well. Same with the Modor NF-1. You'd think that Black Hole or Backwards Garden or similar would make any source sparkle and shine and move, but it's not always the case.

On the other hand, the JP-8 through the 480L is a sound I can listen to all day long. The Bricasti is nice, but doesn't take it to the next level like the Lexicon can do.

Going back in time a bit, I always thought the Ursa Major Stargate treated my Emax outputs more kindly than the analog gear I had at the time (OB-X, Prophet 5). The analogs seemed to lose something whereas the Emax got better.
Old 14th October 2018
  #29
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Quantum7's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgearguy View Post
over the past 30+ years, I've been fortunate enough to own pretty much all the classic reverbs made. EMT 251, Lex 480L, 224, 200, PCM 70, PCM 92, Quantec QRS, Yamaha Rev 5, Rev 7, Eventide SP-2016, H3000, H8000, H9000, Publison IM-90, Bricasti M7, Roland R-880, AKG ADR 68k, AMS RMX-16, as well as a bunch of 'next tier' reverbs. About the only brand I haven't delved into is the high end TC Electronics ones.

minimal sound discussion now - there's lot of subjective info presented so far. This is more focused on the practical side of things.

If you're into "that tone at any cost", then seriously look at picking up a Quantec QRS or EMT 251. Some of the most beautiful sounding machines made ever. Then add another classic reverb to them for more ethereal effects.

If you want vintage and don't mind sending a unit out from time to time, the Lexicon 480L or Eventide SP-2016 (original not the Princeton version) can be serviced in the US by some amazing folks in Cleveland, Ohio.

It's hard to recommend the AMS or Publison no matter how great they are due to the eventual service(s) they will need and the costs associated with that servicing.

A lot of older reverbs (like the PCM 70 or Publison IM-90) are mono in, stereo out if that matters, so check on that. I like them because they only take up one effects send on the mixer.

In addition, a lot of older units can only run one algorithm/preset at a time if that matters. The Lexicon 480L can run 2 in parallel or series, same with the Eventide H8000. The Bricasti is a stereo unit and only runs one thing at a time. The H9000 allows up to 16 algorithms to be running at the same time in a variety of configurations.

The Eventides (with the H9000 the exception) are starting to get along in years (see the rough timeline here) and I've seen reports on their forums that doing things like repairing/replacing the H8000 screens is becoming very difficult.

If you're mainly a 'start with the presets and then tweak' kind of person, the H8000 has a ton of excellent starting points and the front panel is very usable for small tweaks. Same with the Lexicon 480L and Bricasti. The single space Lexicons are IMHO tough to edit for long periods of time. The Bricasti doesn't have 100's of parameters, so it's pretty quick to scroll to the one you want and change things. Same with the Publison IM-90 and RMX 16. Deep dive programming needs some type of software editor for most of the modern effects units.

I generally liked the sound of the PCM 80/81 but found editing them from the front panel to be very tedious, so I rarely edited them and ended up selling them despite the great sound. Same with the PCM-70. If you're leaning towards the newer PCM-92, I'd advice just buying the plug-in from them instead even though I'm a hardware kind of guy.

Some units offer remotes, so where you typically do your editing can come into play. The Bricasti can be purchased with a remote and front panel or a blank panel+remote (or just the full panel no remote obviously). The H8000 remote is *extremely* useful and I probably would have sold off my H8000's much earlier if I didn't have it. The Lex 480L needs the remote of course. Same with the 224. There is a very useful remote for the Publison IM-90, but that's very hard to find.

If recall/DAW integration is important, that narrows down the field considerably. You'll have to research that for the newer products.

Speaking of newer, you can actually try out the Bricasti, Eventide H7600, 8000, and Lexicon PCM 92 from places like Sweetwater (of course used prices are a bit more reasonable).

The Bricasti and H9000 are the only ones still undergoing new development. The Bricasti v2 update added some more modulations and different variations on their signature sound. V3 has been in the works for a while and will end up being a motherboard swap, but Casey is thinking that update will be blowing people away for years to come. Of course, buying now means buying it for what it does today. The H9000 team is just gearing up for new stuff. Their earlier work was focused on porting and bug fixing of their existing algorithms to the new platform. Moving forward, the plan is a lot more new algorithms that take advantage of the significantly increased horsepower.

So - decide what's important to you from the practical side - DAW integration, multiple algorithms in parallel, multiple ins/outs/ease of editing/maintenance and reliability and then look at what your options are after narrowing down the field.

Real gross sound generalization summaries -

close to ideal vintage clean reverb sound = Quantec, EMT
modern beautiful reverb = Bricasti
reverb + any synth for ambient = Eventide H9000 (and family)
classic moving/full/euphonic reverb = Lexicon 480L, 224, 224X, 300
Dark horse amazing reverb plus classic fx = Eventide SP-2016
Reverbs I love but would hesitate to buy now = Publison IM-90 and AMS RMX16

What's still in my rack? Bricasti M7 (x2), Lex 480L, Publison IM-90 (x2), MIDIverb II (haven't actually been using it much - picked it up on a whim because I used to own one many many years ago).
That was very kind of you to take the time to present all that great information. I still find myself leaning towards the Bricasti, as like I mentioned it will also be used for strings and vocals, but I sure wish I could find some Bricasti demos with a synth also. Ultimately I guess I'll just have to hunker down and save for both a Bricasti and and an Eventide H series....to have the best of both worlds.
Old 14th October 2018
  #30
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Originally Posted by nodog View Post
Very good advice from oldgearguy (as always). Still, as someone who owned an Eventide Orville and Space, I personally like the H3000 sound much better than the modern Eventides. That said, it is of course a matter of taste as someone above also mentioned, and the modern Eventides are also very good (especially compared to modern Lexicons IMO)

I also have a Lexicon 300 which is awesome for that luxurious old Lexicon sound while still being relatively cheapish.

Anyway, despite having the Lex 300 and H3000 I must say that the OTO BAM is just as good for less than half the price and it being new + build as a tank does mean it is more future proof also. If you're prepared to spend over a 1000 or even several 1000s for a classic machine why not buy a BAM (if only as an extra)? You can't go wrong with that one.
I'm DEFINITELY going to look into the BAM! I wonder why I can't find it at places like Sweetwater though?
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