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Why are repeated arpeggiated (bass) lines so gratifying? Keyboard Synthesizers
Old 10 hours ago
  #31
Here for the gear
 
MilesAB's Avatar
 

One of the best Arpegiated tracks for me is Eric Prydz “Opus”.

The way the track tempo slowly builds up, reaches a peak and then slows down again. Never gets boring.

Old 9 hours ago
  #32
Lives for gear
 
markodarko's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syn303 View Post
that's good you had to go look all that up.
Yes, it was good of me to look that up for you, wasn’t it.

You’re welcome.
Old 8 hours ago
  #33
Gyu
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gentleclockdivid View Post
Here's a fine example of OstinatO




The marvelous Gerald Donald now as xor gate
Wow! Love this!
Thanks for sharing
Old 7 hours ago
  #34
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by M32 View Post
Repetitive rythms have a lot of psycho-acoustic effect.

They provide a pulse/rythmic anchor around which all other musical elements can move, push and pull.
They allow any listener to have a sense of groove, tempo and pulse that is so easy to follow you can do it unconciously, there's no need to actively think about it, allowing your mind to drift and focus much more on other stuff such as texture, timbre and feeling. So it's perfect for modern music where this is a main character trait.
Pretty much the same reason why a lot of people like 4/4 dance beats, anyone can move rythmically without having to conciously think about it.

There's an instinctive/tribal/ primitive root feeling about this sensation, call it 'trance'
Throughout our evolution in various ways and cultures people have been doing repetitive rituals for prolonged times, so we get into an 'automatic' state, allowing our mind to wander while our bodies and subconcious are doing this cycle.
It's a very simple way of meditating and similar to certain mindfullness techniques.

A nice analogy is when you go running, or cycling. After a while, you fall into this cadence, a body-mind groove which is both soothing and invigorating.

The contrast of static-ness and other elements which vary, creates a nice diversity in -to use a painting analogy- colour.

In music without drums, it creates an easily discernible and audible pulse. In music like the stranger things themes, tangerine dream, ozric tentacles, etc... they ARE the drums effectively.

Analog synths are great for this since every note sounds slightly different.
An acoustic drum or struck/plucked object will also sound a little different every time you hit it.
Maybe the change is so small we can can hardly hear it, but our subconious does,
and it makes the same repetition interesting for a much longer period.
Are you saying it's hypnotic?
Old 7 hours ago
  #35
Lives for gear
 
string6theory's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by M32 View Post
Repetitive rythms have a lot of psycho-acoustic effect.

They provide a pulse/rythmic anchor around which all other musical elements can move, push and pull.
They allow any listener to have a sense of groove, tempo and pulse that is so easy to follow you can do it unconciously, there's no need to actively think about it, allowing your mind to drift and focus much more on other stuff such as texture, timbre and feeling. So it's perfect for modern music where this is a main character trait.
Pretty much the same reason why a lot of people like 4/4 dance beats, anyone can move rythmically without having to conciously think about it.

There's an instinctive/tribal/ primitive root feeling about this sensation, call it 'trance'
Throughout our evolution in various ways and cultures people have been doing repetitive rituals for prolonged times, so we get into an 'automatic' state, allowing our mind to wander while our bodies and subconcious are doing this cycle.
It's a very simple way of meditating and similar to certain mindfullness techniques.

A nice analogy is when you go running, or cycling. After a while, you fall into this cadence, a body-mind groove which is both soothing and invigorating.

The contrast of static-ness and other elements which vary, creates a nice diversity in -to use a painting analogy- colour.

In music without drums, it creates an easily discernible and audible pulse. In music like the stranger things themes, tangerine dream, ozric tentacles, etc... they ARE the drums effectively.

Analog synths are great for this since every note sounds slightly different.
An acoustic drum or struck/plucked object will also sound a little different every time you hit it.
Maybe the change is so small we can can hardly hear it, but our subconious does,
and it makes the same repetition interesting for a much longer period.
QFE... so true.

Yesterday I was in the middle of a follow up post trying to put this into words, but didn’t finish. You said it all so very well here and more, thank you.
Old 1 hour ago
  #36
Quote:
Originally Posted by markodarko View Post
Yes, it was good of me to look that up for you, wasn’t it.

You’re welcome.
i already knew anyway, but please do post links to your music though!
Old 1 hour ago
  #37
M32
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by djtomfoolery View Post
Are you saying it's hypnotic?
Topic:
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