The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Synths for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
What is a good trade that goes with music? Reverb & Delay Plugins
Old 21st January 2018
  #31
Quote:
Originally Posted by daviddever View Post
+1 for software engineering; learn to program at a reasonable level and you'll be able to feed yourself for years.
+2

I did graphic design for a while, about 11 years. I found it to be a tough field, but not in good ways. Regardless of background or experience, everyone fancies themselves a designer, and they all have opinions.

I eventually taught myself web development and that's what I do today. I found that I really enjoy it and it turned out to be a much better fit for me. I've got a pretty good job at an edu and am in school part time working on a computer science degree.

I dig it. Music and programming are my 2 passions, thank god I'm able to make a living with one of them.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #32
Lives for gear
 

Hedge fund trader. Gambling with other people's money never gets old.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #33
Lives for gear
 
DJRAZZ's Avatar
 

Small business owner.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #34
Lives for gear
 

Gigolo
Old 22nd January 2018
  #35
Lives for gear
 
Farmboy presents's Avatar
Sell cut-price liquor, and guns.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #36
Lives for gear
Programming is a field that will not be going away. As a subset of programming, Data analytics is a very desirable and in-demand career field at the moment. I wouldn’t go the business school pathway unless you want to be an accountant, that sh!7 changes way too quick for most schools to really keep up.

Electrical engineering can be quite handy because there will be always be people who want prototype inventions or people to give that Kickstarter money to so that they can get a final price/cost of production for whatever they want funding for.

The Economy is shifting toward entrepreneurship and startups more and more so your best bet is to get in on the Venture Capital pipeline because the Investor class keeps getting more and more money and they want to do something with.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #37
Lives for gear
 

My experience is there’s always a shortage of people like plumbers, carpenters, and electricians. Whether any of that sounds exciting to you businesses and homes always need maintenance.

I’ve tried programming but it’s...not for me.


My day job is as graphic designer and IT at a small company. Problem with graphic design is kind of like audio engineering...everyone knows a free or cheap guy so your entry level pay is pretty low until you can prove yourself (lots of folks don’t really know what they’re doing). I didn’t go to school for this either, I’m completely self taught.

I would discourage trying to make a career out of selling various professional services to bands...they never have any money. At least not the ones you are likely to come across. Not being snarky, just the ****ing truth. Like I said, everyone knows a Free or cheap guy.

Being an audio engineer sounds great on paper but you probably shouldn’t go to school for it (speaking from experience). Tough to find paying clients (bands have no money remember?) and while yeah you will want to move to a big coastal city, then you also face competition against literally everyone else trying to “make it” in addition to the industry vets that have been doing it for 30+ years. And live in an expensive place at that.




You could pursue a career as a roadie...which contradicts my previous statements about working for bands...because you will not be working for a band but for large touring companies hired by their label (money). Pay is actually pretty good assuming you are employed by one of these companies...you will go out with arena level bands and be one of the strong arms that loads and unloads the trucks/etc every day, get to tour the world... Low barrier of entry (no college education required), difficult to have a relationship or even a house/apartment somewhere but are bound to make some connections.


Most importantly though, in the pursuit of happiness proceed to tell everyone else to **** off and follow your dreams regardless of how difficult they may be to achieve.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #38
Gear Maniac
 
jbaggan33's Avatar
 

+1 for plumber. Everyone needs their poo poo pipes cleaned out once in a while.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #39
Lives for gear
 

Definitely electrical or electronics engineering. Carpentry or construction are great options too.

I went to recording school in Vancouver as well, networked, got a job at a studio, turned to freelance, moved to Toronto, got tired of the feast and famine, got a job in corporate audio and AV event services, now working in commercial AV install.

Through all of these jobs there are a ton of skills that make you more of a professional prospect, especially if you want to keep your studio cred and chops in place.

If gear breaks, an education in electronics will fix it. If new gear comes in, knowing how to properly assess power requirements from electrical studies will help. If a new console is purchased, carpentry will be needed to build or modify a desk or door frame. New studio build? A construction background is great so you can properly pour a concrete floor, erect walls, run conduit, etc.

I've been successful in picking up skills along the way, I know a little about all of these fields, just enough to get into trouble really! But working along side these trades and paying attention gives me confidence when these issues arise in the situations I find myself in.

In my current role, I need to be able to speak with architects, mechanical engineers, electricians, etc. All that math I learned I thought I'd never use really comes into play now. I don't record rock bands for money but I get to play with really cool audio and video equipment and I can record my friends during my time off. No stress!

I think you should grab the one that is the most interesting to you, which sounds like electrical. Everyone needs electricity so you should never find yourself our of work. And it makes you a very valuable asset to any studio out there.
You can practice recording while you study. You can earn enough to get some nice toys to record with. You can earn enough to build yourself a nice treated space. But You can't really go the other way and go to recording school while fooling around with power or carpentry. Maybe a little, but not enough to make a solid income.
Old 22nd January 2018
  #40
Lives for gear
 
gremlin moon's Avatar
 

Old 23rd January 2018
  #41
Lives for gear
 
Praxisaxis's Avatar
 

Pardon my temporary thread derail, but what's the difference between a builder and a carpenter? Does the latter do inside stuff like kitchens? Or is it a furniture builder?
Old 23rd January 2018
  #42
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Praxisaxis View Post
Pardon my temporary thread derail, but what's the difference between a builder and a carpenter? Does the latter do inside stuff like kitchens? Or is it a furniture builder?
Dunno bout anywhere else, but here in Australia when a building goes up or has a significant amount of structural work done you need someone with a building license to oversee and sign off on the project - so not only are they doing carpentry work, but they're often involved from the planning stage (working with the plans & costing) and contract/manage the other tradesman (plumbers, electricians, painters etc). The bigger "building" companies doing commercial sites will often use civil engineers for that role.

Someone who does "carpentry" might only work on the frames, decking, fencing or the internal cabinets. Or they could be hand making furniture elsewhere and not even work in construction.
Old 23rd January 2018
  #43
Lives for gear
 
Praxisaxis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlappyD00 View Post
Dunno bout anywhere else, but here in Australia when a building goes up or has a significant amount of structural work done you need someone with a building license to oversee and sign off on the project - so not only are they doing carpentry work, but they're often involved from the planning stage (working with the plans & costing) and contract/manage the other tradesman (plumbers, electricians, painters etc). The bigger "building" companies doing commercial sites will often use civil engineers for that role.

Someone who does "carpentry" might only work on the frames, decking, fencing or the internal cabinets. Or they could be hand making furniture elsewhere and not even work in construction.
ok gotcha thanks. I'm from Aussieland too
Old 23rd January 2018
  #44
Lives for gear
 
breakmixer's Avatar
 

A carpenter utilizes timber to construct things, from hanging doors to constructing timber partitions, I.e. first and second fix, some carpenters work in construction creating moulds to hold and withstand concrete pressure, this is called formwork/shuttering.
Old 23rd January 2018
  #45
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Praxisaxis View Post
ok gotcha thanks. I'm from Aussieland too
No worries. I knew there was a few of us floating around somewhere!
Old 23rd January 2018
  #46
Lives for gear
 
shreddoggie's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by smutek View Post
+2

I did graphic design for a while, about 11 years. I found it to be a tough field, but not in good ways. Regardless of background or experience, everyone fancies themselves a designer, and they all have opinions.
The absolute HELL of being a skilled and competent professional designer with decades of experience: everyone has eyes and there is no buffer on the connection from the eyes to the mouth. Wouldn't be so bad if they didn't ACTUALLY BELIEVE that their woefully naive opinions actually had some value.
Old 23rd January 2018
  #47
Lives for gear
 

Welder, Plumber, Electrician, etc, these trades do pretty well, and aren't tied to trends.

Engineers (as in Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical, etc) are solid professions.

Accountants, which, like the others, aren't very sexy careers, are always in demand.
Old 23rd January 2018
  #48
Lives for gear
Regional sales manager for a music instrument manufacturer.
Old 23rd January 2018
  #49
Gear Addict
 
Dhji's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SovietSpaceChild View Post
How old are you and do you currently hold a degree or any certificates? Do you have any aptitude for math and/or programming?
I am 27, I have spent a majority of my life in PTSD delusions, but thank god for vipassana meditation, I am now able to function and getting better day by day. Last I did math, I was pretty fast at it, I like solving problems quickly. But that was in grade 8. I went for an assessment at a college for english and got grade 11 so I can do grade 12. Growing up in group/foster homes, I developed a pretty intense understanding of mentally ill people but I don't really want to work with them. What kind of math is programming? I feel like the world is my oyster and I am ready to tackle anything in my way. (literally overcoming ptsd is just profound, I feel invincible).
Old 23rd January 2018
  #50
Gear Maniac
 
jbaggan33's Avatar
 

If you do programming/computer work all day at work, you will not want to be staring at your DAW after work. In fact, staring at a computer will be the last thing you want to do, so get ready to toss your ITB stuff in the ****ter and buy some hardware for all your music production needs.
Old 23rd January 2018
  #51
Deleted User
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dhji View Post
Well I was originally going to go to audio engineering school in Vancouver (Nimbus), but then I thought maybe it's wisest to do a trade so I could pay for it. But maybe not? I was thinking electrical (Electronics & Computer Engineering Technology - Renewable Energy - Camosun College), but then I was thinking how many times will I run into a situation where I will have to use these skills? Then I thought what kinds of situations would I run into that a trade in general would be handy to have?

Maybe I am thinking this all wrong. Maybe what I need to do is digital art, where artists are constantly needing logo's and album art done... Or maybe a website designer? Nah maybe not that because most people use social media platforms these days... Or not?

What are your thoughts?
are you rich ? if you dont need cash then do what you love , if you need money then forget anything to do with getting cash of artists , a larger % are fked and fill shelves since streaming kicked in , my advice is if a career of paid work is what your after get a job at Spotify or in ray kurzweils ' disruptive tech is great ' department or write a book on why not to be a musician.( as music is dead )
Top Mentioned Products
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump