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Linnstrument
Old 1st April 2017
  #1
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spaceman's Avatar
 

Linnstrument

Anyone here using one ?
I'm very seriously considering buying one soon. Probably the cheaper and more portable Linnstrument 128 version.
Old 1st April 2017
  #2
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Yes, have the full size. Works great with hardware, although MPE won't be universally realized depending on how old the gear is.

Paul Schilling, who may be recognized by his Arturia patch banks, made some videos paired with a Prophet 6.


Quote:
Linnstrument+Prophet-6 poly AT improv - YouTube



Just noodling around. The poly aftertouch is very responsive and smooth.
Old 1st April 2017
  #3
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I'd consider the Rise instead. Listen to all the Linnstrument demos. I couldn't find one that showed a really good performance. Not one. There's always an awkwardness to the playing and expression, and I can't imagine it's the fault of the user. My guess is, the spacing and feel of the keys doesn't lend itself to nuance and fluid playing.

Alternately, there are a lot of demos of the Roli Rise and Seaboard that are great. I bit on a Rise 49 and I'm ultra happy with it. First off, I already know the key layout. The keys feel amazing. The response is smooth and easily controllable. I found almost no leaning curve. I wasn't great, but I was able to execute good, but simple stuff, very quickly. The Equator software instrument is very good. My only real complaint is that the Roili control app doesn't let you set up presets for quick reconfiguring of the Rise to use with different synths. Overall, I'm very happy.
Old 1st April 2017
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocrossing View Post
I'd consider the Rise instead. Listen to all the Linnstrument demos. I couldn't find one that showed a really good performance. Not one. There's always an awkwardness to the playing and expression, and I can't imagine it's the fault of the user. My guess is, the spacing and feel of the keys doesn't lend itself to nuance and fluid playing.
Third post in and we've already got someone loudly and proudly speaking from a position of total ignorance!
Old 2nd April 2017
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manalishi View Post
Third post in and we've already got someone loudly and proudly speaking from a position of total ignorance!
Prove me wrong. Sounds with long attacks don't count.

Last edited by zerocrossing; 2nd April 2017 at 05:58 AM..
Old 2nd April 2017
  #6
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Take what I say with a grain of salt, since I haven't played either yet, but from viewing countless demos, it seems like the rise, once mastered, can be used for virtuosic performances. There are several examples of people playing fairly complex material on them, whereas the same can't be said of the linnstrument.

The linnstrument would be easier for someone who is a non-keyboardist to pick up due to the isomorphic design, but it doesn't seem to lend itself as well to fast, 2-handed passages. If that's not what you need, then the linnstrument should be fine for you. Also, it just might be the case that no one has put in the time to learn it, whereas a good pianist can adapt to the roli in less time. That's where Roli's approach to marketing was smart, employing several guys to master the instrument and demo it at all the trade shows.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #7
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I have a Linnstrument (the big one). It's fantastic.

I've owned a Haken Continuum (the big one) for a number of years, and when the Roli first came out I was interested - until I played it. The grippy-ness of the rubber playing surface was not to my liking, and the raised "key waves" prevented smoothly sliding between / across notes. In order to do "ribbon controller" type stuff, you need to slide left-to-right on the little flat strips above and below the raised keys. For pitch vibrato similar to a violin or guitar, the Roli stuff works just fine, but the rubber is so grippy that even front-to-back sliding for modulation expression was problematic for me - the rubber had a tendency to "bunch up" and I was actually pushing a little wrinkle along with my finger. Does the Rise even do the front-to-back modulation thing? There might be some limitation of the Rise versus the Seaboard (which was the one I tried) - I can't remember exactly. At the rollout event for the Seaboard a few years ago there were some ace players jamming out on the thing, and they were good players for sure - but it was "widdly-widdly-widdly" all over the place. Fine, whatever, not my thing. So I passed on the Seaboard and went home to my Continuum.

When the cheaper, slicker looking Rise came out, I gave it another chance - but my issues with the rubbery surface remained. I love the build quality, minimalist industrial design, and the concept - but I just can't gel with the thing - a matter of personal taste. Another pass. But then I'm not someone with good traditional keyboard technique anyway, so maybe that's part of it.

I had not even paid much attention to the Linnstrument, since I am "sort of" a keyboard player and I thought the guitar-like layout of the Linnstrument would confuse me. Boy was I wrong. At the NAMM show this past January I gave it yet another look, and spent some time with Roger, learning more about it, playing it, trying different sound sources..... and immediately bought one.

It's pretty amazing. Smooth pitch slides across large ranges (ribbon controller style) are no problem - the little divisions between the "cells" are not an issue when sliding across them. The sensitivity and "curves" are amazingly well-calibrated and it just "feels right" on power-up. Left-right vibrato feels natural, although the front-back modulation / expression can sometimes feel like it's a lot of result from a small amount of finger movement - so adjust your receiving instrument accordingly.

You can play very fast if you want, even using it as a drum pad matrix. The ability to change the relative pitch of each row is pretty great, but even in the guitar-like layout it's very clear what's going on. The LEDs under each pad are in different colors to show you where a pitch in one row is duplicated in another row, and this reflects any changes you make into the pitch relationships between the rows. Despite being a bit of a fumbler on guitar, I felt comfortable on the Linnstrument very quickly.

It's pretty amazing and a great alternative to the Haken, which for a while was the only game in that part of town, and is still in a class of its own - but stupidly expensive. What you're paying for in the Haken is a design that is mechanically complex but amazingly sensitive and versatile, and of course the very powerful internal DSP sound engine which can even process external sounds coming in via AES.

The other up-and-comer is the Keith McMillen K-Board Pro-4 - which I don't think is shipping yet, and is a more conventional keyboard with rubber keys that are not hinged like a traditional keyboard, but are sensitive to pressure, velocity, left-right wiggling for pitch vibrato, and front-back expression. This will be a very cool device for sure but way more like a traditional keyboard.

Out of all four, I'd pick Haken first, Linnstrument second, K-Board third, and Roli last. But that's just me.

If you have any interest in the Linnstrument, maybe get it from someplace where you can return it if you don't get on well with it, like Sweetwater or whatever.

I quite like it, and there can be no doubt that Roger Linn is a true innovator and knows how to make music technology that "feels right". Linnstrument does.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #8
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I have full size Linstrument.

Recently I'm playing only with it mainly because it gives me 4+ octaves in extremely compact footprint easy to carry around. Another very important thing is that you can reconfigure Linnstrument on the fly, change settings and behaviour without computer and along with usb midi it has DIN midi for universal connectivity.

From musical perspective grid layout allows experimenting with chord structures more easily for me, but it is harder to play and remember complex melodic passages - requires some learning curve compared to traditional piano layout.

I havn't had chance to play roli rise, but apart from layout differences roli has built in bluetooh connectivity - great for wireless connection to mobile apps and longer Y slide gives more control to individual note expression, as well as less learning curve for traditional keyboardist.

I hope this helps.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocrossing View Post
Prove me wrong.
Eh? You're the one making a claim from a position of zero experience. Rather than say "I don't actually know", you offered the OP buying advice based on guesswork.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #10
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I´ll just throw in my post from last year about the MPE alternatives:

Quote:
"Best" is tricky, since the different controllers all have their ups and downs. I did play the Seaboard (Grand, not Rise) and the Continuum for a bit at Messe and have a Linnstrument for a while now. I can not really talk about the other stuff.

The Continuum feels most like a "real instrument". It is a pleasure to play, has a nice internal sound engine, works well with percussive stuff and allows for the smoothest slides and the best Y-axis control for the initial touch. It is also reasonably easy to play cords, But it will need quite some practice to avoid the occasional wrong note. Drawbacks: It is the most expensive instrument, the computer connection is via MIDI, which needs a good MIDI interface and has an overall lower data throughput then a USB connection, you probably want the voice expansion. The Continuum is quite big. While the aftertouch is fantastic, the one thing I did not love 100% when trying it is the saturation behaviour. There is a rater subtle increase of force necessary to push the surface deeper. Once you reach the maximum depth there is a sudden stop. This felt strange at first, but it might even be an advantage to have a well defined maximum preasure. Not sure...

The Linnstrument is the most "utilitarian" of the bunch. It is quite good for percussive play, the grid layout makes cords harder to play (for a keyboard guy), but you can play pretty absurd cords running over several octaves with one hand. It is small light, easy to configure and can run with MIDI or USB (class compliant). You also get a 5 octave range in the standard configuration and you can get even more range if you want. The very short Y-axis gives you less control over the initial touch, but it makes it easier to do full range modulation with one finger while holding a chord. The slight grooves on the surface make it easier to keep your finger on a specific note, but they also make pitch slides are a bit less even, since the surface structure will modulate the aftertouch slightly while sliding. Controlling the amount of aftertouch works surprisingly well. With a bit of practice I do not really miss the deformable surfaces of the Continuum/Seaboard.

The seaboard I tried did not have the Y-axis control. Even the Rise will not be ideal for Y-axis control, since the "black keys" might get in the way of sliding your finger through the Y-axis. It is the MPE keyboard, that is the closest to a classic piano keyboard. After playing it for a few minutes you can already jam with it. Slides are more limited, since you basically have to slide down to the top/bottom parts before you slide sideways. The seaboard is very good at doing normal piano stuff with added manual vibrato/tremolo. For small pitch wiggles the keywaves are great, since you will have a slight force towards the "right" pitch. Small pitchbeds therefore kind of feel like bending a string. It also has a very organic aftertouch response. Maybe not as detailed as the Continuum, but it also feels very good (and you do not get the sudden aftertouch saturation, that the Continuum has).

I hope that helps. The bad news: Basically you have to play them for yourself. And even than you would probably need to play each for tens of hours to really know, which one works best for you.

The good news: At least all the ones I played where great controllers. So you can not really go wrong with either of them.
About the lack of virtuous Linnstrument performances on the Internet:
The Linnstrument is not really like any other (common) instrument out there. The layout is similar to stringed instruments, but the play style is quite different. It also does not come with a default plug-in and when it came out setting stuff up for MPE use was quite elaborate.

I think/fear, that it will take a couple of years for people to master the Linnstrument. While I have mine for quite a bit now, I did not really practice enough to get anywhere close to virtuosity. My piano skills are not great and the Linnstrument skills are worse, so I am not the right guy to refute the claim that there are no great performances out there yet...

You also would not expect great violin performances from somebody who just plays the instruments for 2-3 years and only a few hours a month....
Old 2nd April 2017
  #11
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Mefistophelees's Avatar
I've got a Linnstrument though I have't had the chance to play it very much yet. That said, it's really easy to get started, just play the lights.

The fingering for all scales is the same so you don't have to learn different fingering to play different scales.
Playing chords is slightly confusing at first but once you know a major chord it's the same shape for all major chords. Same goes for other chords.

The default layout is the same as a bass guitar so you can learn a lot on how to play from bass videos books etc.
I don't put mine flat like most, I hold mine like a guitar. I'm quite happy to play it like a bassist / guitarist because it feels very natural.

One thing that surprised me is that the playing is instantly more expressive, you don't even have to think about it.
I'm amazed how much expression guitarists can get out of their instruments and I'd like to be able to do the same with a synth. I think the Linnstrument can help me do this.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #12
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Thanks for all the various opinions. Keep them coming.
I just played a bit on the Roli but i think both of them are great expressive controllers , with their own strenghts. I wanted to go with the Linn 128 in the end partly for practical reasons : I'll be using the controlller for live playing later this year more than for studio work, and i wanted a controller with more than 2 octaves, and that will fit into the limits of one of those carry-on airplane luggage, with the rest of everything ( macbook, Akai/Ableton controller, audio interface, headphones, and various bits )
I'll be using it mostly for playing pad chords, and solo lead lines with horizontal -axis pitch slides between notes, the way i've always dreamed about since seeing the Continuum ( which is priced well beyond my means ).

I was naturally drawn to the Roli first since i "think" easier in traditional keyboard layouts rather than the Linn string-like layouts, and the Linn has a hard surface unlike the Roli, which feels weird to me ( having played on various controller apps on my IPad) but the Roli 49 is too big unlike the Linn 128 which is even smaller than my Akai Apc.
Perhaps the Roli is better for fast paced traditionnal keyboard parts, but i won't be doing that on this live project. So, Linn 128 it will be, even if i still might consider a Roli 49 in the future for studio work.

PS : this is probably the best clip i've seen concerning the expressivity of the Linn :

Last edited by spaceman; 2nd April 2017 at 03:33 PM..
Old 2nd April 2017
  #13
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One thing I often use the Linnstrument for is for both notes and as a MIDI CC controller. I know Roger absolutely wanted the Linnstrument to be a players instrument and not simply a control surface, but I often set up a split with notes on one side and 8 CCs on the other. that gives me quick access to playing expressively with the note side and also gives an additional 8 CCs I can quickly set by sliding or simply touching.

Since most people don't mess with the source and roll their own customizations (I did though), the open source nature of the Linnstrument does keep that door open.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spaceman View Post
Thanks for all the various opinions. Keep them coming.
I just played a bit on the Roli but i think both of them are great expressive controllers , with their own strenghts. I wanted to go with the Linn 128 in the end partly for practical reasons : I'll be using the controlller for live playing later this year more than for studio work, and i wanted a controller with more than 2 octaves, and that will fit into the limits of one of those carry-on airplane luggage, with the rest of everything ( macbook, Akai/Ableton controller, audio interface, headphones, and various bits )
I'll be using it mostly for playing pad chords, and solo lead lines with horizontal -axis pitch slides between notes, the way i've always dreamed about since seeing the Continuum ( which is priced well beyond my means ).

I was naturally drawn to the Roli first since i "think" easier in traditional keyboard layouts rather than the Linn string-like layouts, and the Linn has a hard surface unlike the Roli, which feels weird to me ( having played on various controller apps on my IPad) but the Roli 49 is too big unlike the Linn 128 which is even smaller than my Akai Apc.
Perhaps the Roli is better for fast paced traditionnal keyboard parts, but i won't be doing that on this live project. So, Linn 128 it will be, even if i still might consider a Roli 49 in the future for studio work.

PS : this is probably the best clip i've seen concerning the expressivity of the Linn :
OK, I take it back. That was good. I can't help but think out of the scores of clips I've seen that I'd have experienced more than one showing decent timing and expression. The previous clip with the Prophet 6 sounded terrible. The long attack masked any timing issues, but the expression part just sounds awkward like they were struggling to control it with a decent degree of nuance. It's still my idea that the Linn probably requires a much larger commitment to practice to get it sounding smooth and fluid. This might be partially because I come from a guitar background. It's my main instrument. There's something about the Roli that just instantly felt right. Within a minute or two, I loaded up a duduk patch in Equator and did a performance that I was happy with. More than happy. I was giggling like a madman. I've been searching for a good way to control synths for so long and nothing ever seemed good or affordable. Roland GR hex pickup stuff sucks and the Starrlabs stuff is a joke. Actually, I found Push to be pretty good, but I use Ableton and I won't go into how stupid Live is for filtering out polyaftertouch.

The comments about the "bunching up" of the silicon material on the Roli... I don't know were that comes from. I can't imagine that happening unless you're pressing it far too hard. It definitely doesn't need the kind of velocity that a standard keyboard uses. The material feels smooth and it's very easy to slide around. If you hit the note on the "hump," it will quantize to pitch, but if you hit it on the flat parts it won't. That does take practice, like any frettless string instrument or horn.
Old 2nd April 2017
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manalishi View Post
Eh? You're the one making a claim from a position of zero experience. Rather than say "I don't actually know", you offered the OP buying advice based on guesswork.
But he made it clear what guesswork was involved on his part; It was a factual representation of unverifiable reasoning processes regarding personal preferences. Anecdotes are obviously not proof, but that doesn't mean that they aren't data for consideration either. Claiming to own one or both does not make any assessment 100% accurate either necessarily, so you're barking up the wrong tree when economic decisions are the topic.

Gravity is just guesswork too if you think about it.

Last edited by Discopotato; 2nd April 2017 at 07:34 PM.. Reason: Grammar
Old 1st May 2017
  #16
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Hi all--

I just noticed this thread and thought I'd chime in. One of the problems of being a small company is that it's difficult to get lots of dealers to keep LinnStrument in stock, so it's often difficult find one locally to try out. However, with over 1100 LinnStrument owners, there's a good chance that someone near you has one and would be happy to let you try it out. Email me at [email protected] and I'll see if I can find someone near you. Or, in the internet era it's perfectly reasonable to to order one to try out then send it back. If you order direct from my site & you're in the U.S. email me and ask me to include a pre-printed return shipping label (U.S. only), so you can simply put it back in the box and drop it off at any Fedex Office center without paying anything, because shipping is free when ordered from my site. By the way, any email address you find on my site goes directly to me because I'm the only person at the company, and I answer all support emails personally.

Regarding the Seaboard Rise, it's a very well-designed and beautiful instrument and I highly recommend it. Roland Lamb and I are good friends and are on the same mission-- to give electronic musicians an expressive alternative to on/off switches. So I'm happy to see people buying either a LinnStrument or Rise. In my opinion, LinnStrument's Fourths String Layout is better at expressive pitch gestures, but the Rise makes perfect sense if you already possess skills on the piano keyboard.

Regarding Equator, they did a great job on its design and by coincidence the Dudek is my favorite Equator preset -- beautifully expressive and I love how the timbre changes so naturally in the Y-axis.
Old 1st May 2017
  #17
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I own a full size LinnStrument. It's a fantastic instrument. I'm a guitar player and immediately took to the layout. While much is made of the MPE aspect, I don't leverage that much, instead preferring monophonic sounds. There, the vibrato, pressure->volume and pitch slides are wonderfully expressive. Firing up e.g. a SampleModeling cello is a recipe for a few lost hours

There is much configurability, split modes, low-row modes (like retrigger, a marvel for bass patches) etc. The support has been excellent and firmware updates with lots of new and useful functionality have arrived regularly.

If you have the inclination though, IMO the ultimate rewards fall to those who can do sound/patch design specifically for and with the LinnStrument at hand. Having the expressivity under your fingers while designing a sound leads to sounds that simply 'do more' than you otherwise would with the same synth, and make the synth+LinnStrument combo more like 'real' instruments from an expressivity and musicality standpoint than ever before, in my experience. Once you've experienced it you will not want to settle for less (e.g. no more delayed LFO for vibrato

Thus, while much is made of MPE support or lack thereof in soft/hardware synths, MPE aside, having a LinnStrument *will* have you seeking precise and wide-ranging pitch bend support, copious and scalable CC parameter control etc from your synths.

I love it. Highly recommended.
Old 2nd May 2017
  #18
One thought to consider is that string players are used to playing rapid and dextrous finger patterns with their left hand, while keyboard players use their right for the same kind of melodic material.

So the linnstrument for a string player could be set up with pitch on the left hand and midi cc and adsr env filter and much more timbral controls for the left - this arrangement could look backwards to someone used to playing lead patterns on a traditional mono-synth. But could be a natural set up for a guitar or cello player.

Just thinking out loud here... great to have Roger on this thread with us!

proftea
Old 2nd May 2017
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof_Tea View Post
One thought to consider is that string players are used to playing rapid and dextrous finger patterns with their left hand, while keyboard players use their right for the same kind of melodic material.

So the linnstrument for a string player could be set up with pitch on the left hand and midi cc and adsr env filter and much more timbral controls for the left - this arrangement could look backwards to someone used to playing lead patterns on a traditional mono-synth. But could be a natural set up for a guitar or cello player.
Agreed, and I've asked for that (a split/mirror mode that orients the left side with pitch increasing first-finger -> pinky). I think the firmware now in beta might add something like that.
Old 2nd May 2017
  #20
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Yes, I'll be posting the new 2.1.0 update in the next day or two. (And the beta is up on the forum now.) The previous software permitted Left-Handed Mode, reversing the pitch direction. But this update goes farther, permitting independent pitch direction reversal for each of the two keyboard splits. For example, the left split can have reversed pitch direction but not the right split, so the pitch direction of the two splits is mirrored.
Old 2nd May 2017
  #21
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Good to know. It's not particularly useful for me, but it's great that you continue to update the Linnstrument.

I actually prefer that the Linnstrument is different to both piano and guitar layouts (I'm originally a guitarist). It lets me discover chord voicings and melodic playing styles that are not the usual cliches of muscle memory/habit.
Old 2nd May 2017
  #22
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how well it works with standard midi synths?
Old 3rd May 2017
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogGuy View Post
how well it works with standard midi synths?
I don't have problem playing standard synths, but perhaps programs, which are not designed for MPE need some adjustments to better accommodate cc data coming out from Linnstrument. If you have complex program, for example, which heavily (sensitively) relies on mod wheel position it could be harder to play with Linstrument as small vertical (Y) movement would influence sound more than you would like and not all synths allow easy correction with some sensitivity curve.
Old 4th June 2017
  #24
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draig's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocrossing View Post
I'd consider the Rise instead. Listen to all the Linnstrument demos. I couldn't find one that showed a really good performance. Not one. There's always an awkwardness to the playing and expression, and I can't imagine it's the fault of the user. My guess is, the spacing and feel of the keys doesn't lend itself to nuance and fluid playing.

Alternately, there are a lot of demos of the Roli Rise and Seaboard that are great. I bit on a Rise 49 and I'm ultra happy with it. First off, I already know the key layout. The keys feel amazing. The response is smooth and easily controllable. I found almost no leaning curve. I wasn't great, but I was able to execute good, but simple stuff, very quickly. The Equator software instrument is very good. My only real complaint is that the Roili control app doesn't let you set up presets for quick reconfiguring of the Rise to use with different synths. Overall, I'm very happy.
I finally had a chance to play a Linnstrument and it was great.

I agree that there are more good Rise demos than Linnstrument demos, but that is not due to the instruments but other factors. I think the Rise is more readily available and the traditional keyboard layout means plenty of people already have a high degree of playing skill. Also, it comes with a synth that immediately makes good use of its expressive capability.

Having spent a couple hours playing the Linnstrument, it is fantastic for expressive playing and equally as good as the Rise. They both have some advantages over the other and they are both a big advance over the usual midi controller.

I eventually will get both, but am starting with the Linnstrument for a few reasons. One, the Linnstrument does not require a computer. It has both USB and standard MIDI connections and you can plug it straight to a hardware synth for example. Two, all the configuration options are right there on the instrument itself. It is fast to change for different uses. Three, it is future proof.

Also, if you want to be portable, the smaller Linnstrument easily fits in a backpack but still has 4 octaves.
Old 4th June 2017
  #25
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I have a LS 200 and really like it. It think that it is a great concept and it is well executed. It is solid, well constructed and intelligently laid out in terms of functionality. And don't forget that you can use it as a sequencer. I think it is going to become more and more accepted, but it will take a period of time.
Old 28th June 2017
  #26
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pympwell's Avatar
I love my Linnstrument. I'm mainly a bass player so I dig the layout for sure.
Old 28th June 2017
  #27
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draig's Avatar
 

I've had my Linnstrument for a while now. Been waiting for this level of expressiveness for decades! And so satisfying that it has arrived in a well made and intelligently conceived instrument.

I find the user interface brilliant. There is no need for a computer app for configuration. There is no screen on the instrument itself and so no need to dive into menus. All the configuration, which is considerable, is done right on the hardware itself via buttons and using the playing surface as the 'screen'. Hands on, informative, easy to remember and easy to 'read' in a variety of situations.

It powers just fine from my laptop usb. It is compact (I have the 128). So I can take my laptop and the Linnstrument, both in a backpack and go sit anywhere... inside, outside, cafe, park and play one of the very best midi controllers ever made. How cool is that!

And playing the Linnstrument is a revelation! It is sensitive, nuanced, integrated and so expressive with just the fingers on the pads. No need for the frankenstein mix of various controllers like modwheel, ribbon, pedals, pitchwheel, just to get a clumsy portion of what is available right on the Linnstrument pads. It feels like an instrument! I'm very happy with it and at this point cannot think of a single thing I wish were different.
Old 29th June 2017
  #28
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gjvti's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by draig View Post
I've had my Linnstrument for a while now. Been waiting for this level of expressiveness for decades! And so satisfying that it has arrived in a well made and intelligently conceived instrument.

I find the user interface brilliant. There is no need for a computer app for configuration. There is no screen on the instrument itself and so no need to dive into menus. All the configuration, which is considerable, is done right on the hardware itself via buttons and using the playing surface as the 'screen'. Hands on, informative, easy to remember and easy to 'read' in a variety of situations.

It powers just fine from my laptop usb. It is compact (I have the 128). So I can take my laptop and the Linnstrument, both in a backpack and go sit anywhere... inside, outside, cafe, park and play one of the very best midi controllers ever made. How cool is that!

And playing the Linnstrument is a revelation! It is sensitive, nuanced, integrated and so expressive with just the fingers on the pads. No need for the frankenstein mix of various controllers like modwheel, ribbon, pedals, pitchwheel, just to get a clumsy portion of what is available right on the Linnstrument pads. It feels like an instrument! I'm very happy with it and at this point cannot think of a single thing I wish were different.
I feel the same too. Recently Linnstrument has become my main midi controller, even did some live assistance with it.
Old 29th June 2017
  #29
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I find my Linnstrument to be brilliant. It is a wonderful interface. Hight quality also. Props to Rodger.
Old 30th June 2017
  #30
Gear Addict
I was just looking at the chord patterns on the Linnstrument. I noticed it looks like it would be quite a contortion to play some four-note chords, such as a Cmin7, with one hand. I suppose no one is buying any of Linstrument/Rise/Continuum to play Maple Leaf Rag on it. But if I wanted to play bigger chords it looks like the Rise would be best at that. Would you Linnstrument owners agree? In fact maybe even triads are not played so quickly? Though obviously it would be great for solos.
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