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The 'Show Yer Licks/Practice Tips' Thread
Old 9th December 2009
  #31
Jax
Lives for gear
 

I'm gonna see if that works. Seems like it would.
Old 13th December 2009
  #32
Here for the gear
 

My favorite warmup - The Wig Out

I learned this when I studied with Bob Gullotti, who is hands down the best teacher I have ever studied with. If you are anywhere near the Boston area look this guy up.

Anyways, this is a study in poly-rhythms and a warm up exercise that will put you in the "zone" to practice or perform. Follow the link for the full description and a PDF of the exercise. It looks more complicated than it really is...check out the example videos and it will all make sense.

Cheers.

Zildjian.com - en-US
Old 13th January 2010
  #33
http://www.nextcat.com/wolfpack

check out .... is there a drummer in the house ??
Old 25th January 2010
  #34
Here for the gear
 

I call this "Freddie the wheel"

Play single stroke RLRL etc etc starting on 1/4notes and move through all the rhythmic cycles..i.e 1/4 notes,1/4 note triplets,1/8th notes etc etc...all the way to 32nd note triplets...

Do this with 1/4 notes on bass drum/2 & 4 hats

Do this with doubles RRLLRRLL etc etc

Also this exercise is badass too

RRLLRRLL
RLLRRLLR
LLRRLLRR
LRRLLRRL

Play each line 4 times then move on without stopping...you can also do this with cycles or 1,2,4,5,8, etc etc

Try this too...badassed

RLRRLRLL
RLLRLRRL
RRLRLLRL
RLRLLRLR
Old 9th November 2010
  #35
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goliath|Audio View Post
lllR

three gracenotes preceeding an accent.

-------

it all comes down to the building blocks. Practice technique in front of the mirror. Start slow, ramp up to top speed and then back down without breaking technique.
Just clarifying here. I think when most people say "ruff," they mean a three-stroke ruff, which is two grace notes with one hand, and then an accented note with the other hand (llR). The first two notes can be played as kind of a buzz-roll stroke ("closed"), or "open," i.e. as two discernable notes. A four-stroke ruff (i.e. four notes played), is most commonly played alternating (lrlR, rlrL, etc.) Obviously, you can do whatever you want, but playing lllR fast enough to get the sound of a "ruff" (i.e. very fast notes leading up to an accent) would be extremely hard, and what's the point, if you can do it alternating and it still sounds great?

Peace
Old 14th April 2011
  #36
Gear Head
 

On the topic of paradiddles, I find it best to practice all rudiments in an open-close-open format:

CLICK HERE: YouTube - Rudiments - Single Paradiddle (I somehow can't get the youtube embed feature to work properly)

Old 15th May 2011
  #37
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cajonezzz's Avatar
 

It would be great if more of these tips had video demos with'em... easy to do!

I'll try to drop a couple here soon.
Old 24th October 2011
  #38
Here for the gear
 
checodrum25's Avatar
 

Here is littel video of me checono24's Channel - YouTube hope you guys like it leave youre comments so I can learn more , also if you have afacebook send me link so I can add [email protected]
Old 7th January 2012
  #39
Gear Head
Play along with Al Jackson tracks! You'll be crushing more sessions!

WILLIE MITCHELL - LAST TANGO IN PARIS - YouTube
Old 1st April 2012
  #40
Lives for gear
Playing rudiments with no accents has made a huge difference for me. It allows for more options if you can play, say, paradiddles where all the strokes are even.

The classic exercise for regularity (in level) is RLRL RLRL RRLL RRLL RLRR LRLL. The goal, of course, is for someone who is listening (and not watching) to not be able to tell the difference. Paying attention to stick height is helpful.

Play it super slow for starters and one finds that the natural tendency is to accent RLRR LRLL, which of course limits its flexibility/applicability.

A great way to practice regularity/even-ness of time (a metronome only addresses notes of the subdivision it's set to, e.g. quarter notes; everything in between is up to you to address) is by offsetting patterns/rudiments/groupings.

For instance, if you wanna hear how even your doubles are, try: RLLR RLLR as 8th- or 16th notes, or RLL RRL LRR LLR as triplets. You will IMMEDIATELY be able to tell how clean they are, whereas playing RRLL RRLL may not tell you how weak or uneven the 2nd strokes are.

Anyway, happy drumming!
Old 5th April 2012
  #41
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 

cool thread!
love trying new exercises.

not a drummer but i love beaten on these things when i can.
Old 10th May 2012
  #42
Lives for gear
Important stuff.






Cheers and happy drumming
Old 11th May 2012
  #43
Lives for gear
 
ImJohn's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by LimpyLoo View Post
Playing rudiments with no accents has made a huge difference for me. It allows for more options if you can play, say, paradiddles where all the strokes are even.

The classic exercise for regularity (in level) is RLRL RLRL RRLL RRLL RLRR LRLL. The goal, of course, is for someone who is listening (and not watching) to not be able to tell the difference. Paying attention to stick height is helpful.

Play it super slow for starters and one finds that the natural tendency is to accent RLRR LRLL, which of course limits its flexibility/applicability.

A great way to practice regularity/even-ness of time (a metronome only addresses notes of the subdivision it's set to, e.g. quarter notes; everything in between is up to you to address) is by offsetting patterns/rudiments/groupings.

For instance, if you wanna hear how even your doubles are, try: RLLR RLLR as 8th- or 16th notes, or RLL RRL LRR LLR as triplets. You will IMMEDIATELY be able to tell how clean they are, whereas playing RRLL RRLL may not tell you how weak or uneven the 2nd strokes are.

Anyway, happy drumming!

Good advice LimpyLoo and really well done freestroke video too!

I just wanted to add that when working towards hand to hand evenness, be sure to select sticks that are the same pitch, otherwise you may drive yourself crazy!

I usually don't bother with pitch matching when getting sticks for rock etc playing, I just check for straightness by rolling them on a glass countertop and watching the tip: if the tip is bobbing up and down it's warped but if the tip stays a constant distance from the glass it is straight. (more or less) I usually just grab ALL the pairs they have of the model I'm interested in buying and then roll them all to get the straightest ones.

I'll also do a quick weight matching by feel if I notice there is a significant difference from stick to stick. For general rock playing I prefer RegalTip 5b hickory nylon tip but depending on the tree and probably which part of the trunk the stick was made from the weight can vary greatly! So I grab each stick and do a few quick strokes in the air to judge the heft and then make piles of heavy and light or three piles (heavy, medium and light) if there is a wide enough range. For me I prefer the medium heavy ones because the heaviest are a little too heavy and the lightest ones are WAY too light.

But if I'm buying a 'special' pair for symphonic/rudimental/recording work I'll 'pitch match' all the straight ones until I have the closest matching pair. In general I use Vic Firth SD2 Bolero sticks for this kind of work. To pitch match, after I've found all the straight ones in the batch (and I'm even more picky about straightness than with the 'rock' sticks) I'll lightly tap each stick on the glass counter and listen to the pitch. The difference in wood density will cause a pitch difference. Fine the pair the matches closest in pitch and buy them. Then guard them with your life! Meaning don't let some slack jaw dude hangin' out in your band room use it on cow bell!
Old 4th January 2013
  #44
Lives for gear
 
abell1234's Avatar
 

maybe this was already brought up but the best way to practice rudiments (imo)...
1. set your metronome to a slow tempo
2. go through one of the rudiments at that tempo on the whole note, then the half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth and quarter note triplet, eighth note triplet and sixteenth note triplet.
3. Go through another rudiment the same way.
The triplets will really mess with your hands and head on patters like paradiddles, but when you can run through all the main rudiments like that you'll find your drumming moves forward by leaps and bounds.

There is also the fun exercise of using the syncopation book and filling in the spaces with double strokes. Take the first page and all the notes that are written you play as accents with the proper hand and all spaces in between accents are played as double strokes quietly. Probably could have explained it better but it is a widely used practice technique that any drum teacher should be able to impart and it really adds some serious spice to your hands during fills or ghost notes.
Old 6th January 2014
  #45
Here for the gear
 

There are lots of conceptual ideas that don't require notation. Here are a few:

1. Play over the bar line when you practice a fill. Instead of crashing on beat 1, crash on the 'and' of 1. Then, the next time crash on beat 2. Then the 'and' of 2 and so on.

2. Play in and out of straight and swing during your fills. Practice with a bar fill and start with 16th notes. Then go to eighth note triplets and back to 16ths or 8ths before the end of the bar. This will be uncomfortable at first but just be sure to keep good time throughout.

3. Use kick, snare and hats for this one: For linear practicing, take a radio jingle, sitcom theme or just sing a few beats. Then put each instrument (kick, snare, or hat) on each beat. It doesn't matter what order but don't hit two things at the same time. This creates some real interesting linear stuff.
Old 19th January 2014
  #46
Here for the gear
 

At the moment I'm doing mostly swiss drumming. There you have totally different rudiments. Very much of this is based on fivetuplets.
So I built some sequence to learn it better and get a feel for it:

R L R L R |L R L R L | <-- normal fivetuplets
RRLLR L R |LLRRL R L | <-- some doubles in it
R LLRRL R |L RRLLR L | <-- "siebener Endstreich"
R L RRLLR |L R LLRRL |

...and so on

In my interpretation it is their kind of paradiddle, because they very seldom play a paradiddle. When you have a beat beginning with R and you need to begin the next one with L, then you do a paradiddle. In Switzerland, you do a quintuplet or a "Siebener Endstreich". "Sieben" is german for seven, since it consists of seven taps.

All the best
Gibarian

Last edited by gibarian; 19th January 2014 at 05:32 PM.. Reason: added monospaced font for the tabs
Old 19th January 2014
  #47
Moderator
 
toolskid's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gibarian View Post
At the moment I'm doing mostly swiss drumming. There you have totally different rudiments. Very much of this is based on fivetuplets.
So I built some sequence to learn it better and get a feel for it:

R L R L R |L R L R L | <-- normal fivetuplets
RRLLR L R |LLRRL R L | <-- some doubles in it
R LLRRL R |L RRLLR L | <-- "siebener Endstreich"
R L RRLLR |L R LLRRL |

...and so on

In my interpretation it is their kind of paradiddle, because they very seldom play a paradiddle. When you have a beat beginning with R and you need to begin the next one with L, then you do a paradiddle. In Switzerland, you do a quintuplet or a "Siebener Endstreich". "Sieben" is german for seven, since it consists of seven taps.

All the best
Gibarian
I got obsessed with a swiss rudimental piece called "the train". Really great stickings and flow!
Old 21st May 2016
  #48
A few licks from awhile ago.. Some Gadd inspired stuff.



Old 31st May 2016
  #49
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by pan60 View Post
i only wish i was a drummer so i truly have nothing to add.:(
you don't need to be a drummer to play drums. heheh
Old 26th August 2016
  #50
Here for the gear
 

Anything rudimental work I prefer Stone's "Stick Control". Even after 25 years this working with this book it offers me new ways to set up practice routines. Hand and feet separate or together. Use cymbals or toms. The possibilities are endless and it really makes you focus on what its title promises. Stick Control.

I use a 'nome and play slow tempos and really try to feel the time gaps. Say 40 bpm. This subconsciously helps with groove playing too.
Old 16th January 2018
  #51
Gear Head
 

Old 1st February 2018
  #52
Gear Maniac
 

Weekly Exercise

For who is interested.

I put up a Weekly Exercise in the paste, for almost 2 years.
Couldn't continue because of a busy schedule.

But since January, it's up again. I hope I can keep it up.

The level is from intermediate to advanced.

You can follow me on Instagram and than it will appear in your feed.
You can visit the site from time to time if you don't want to follow.

www.idmix.be

Have fun
Break some sticks and make music

jk
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