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Clicktrack, how do you guys deal with it? Drum Machines & Samplers
Old 30th May 2006
  #31
I certainly prefer that the drummer play to a click as do any of the other producers who work here, But if they don't it's no big deal, but the last drummer who was here and not playing to a click was Tony Beard and it was a jazz project and oddly enough or not so odd if you know Tony's playing, we used my sequencer as the countoff, without hearing the click after the count off Tony was pretty close to it 4:00 into the tune. Having said that great drummers play to click and make it feel great, drummers who can't play to a click need to practice more. It's part of a musicians fundamentals, being able to play in time, evenly, and in tune and be able to make a sound. As far as making a click I program one in logic, if I need tempo changes I program them, its no big deal at all. It takes a minute.
Old 30th May 2006
  #32
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musiclab
drummers who can't play to a click need to practice more. It's part of a musicians fundamentals, being able to play in time, evenly, and in tune and be able to make a sound.
exactly.
most musicians that i have seen, ( good ones ) generally do not very that much evan with out a click.
i am very sensitive to timing issues and have fired drummer after drummer because they could not be consistent.
the drummer is the back bone of lot's of music they need to be able to play.
sorry but i would rather have a drum machine then a drummer that speeds up and slows down.
Old 30th May 2006
  #33
Smile Playing with a click.

Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected]
I buy music that was recorded to clicks and music that was not. It has no bearing on whether or not I like it. I record drummers to clicks if they sound good playing to one, if they don't I loose the click. Some songs or genres don't sound right with a click. If a click is the way to go, I send Midi Beat Clock from Pro Tools to a SR-16 and choose the sound and the type of click that works for the drummer. Sometimes I do gradual tempo changes. It is just that simple.

www.bluethumbproductions.com
I think its a very important skill that you should all master. I work with drummers
who can use a click like a lever causing me to think my click is slowing very slightly up the chorus and drop straight back on it for the verse. They don’t need to cross
an eighth to provide feel. Like the man said good swing is a repetition of catching up and slowing by a very even amount. With a very good drummer the click amplifies the swing to help the other musicians follow the feel.
Blue thumb has a slightly different method to me but I totally agree with what he says.
At times I make a band rehearse to a click and then turn it off when they can get all the long fills out of it. But that’s only if they are sounding like they are still fighting it. Come on chaps shape up. Its a competitive world out there. Where is the discipline. I think they should bring back National Service. Then you would all have to follow the baton. Bah humbug. Get your hair cut. Can't play two bars at
one tempo, I ask you lads is that a way to run an Empire.
Regards.•:*¨¨*:•. ¸¸.•´¯`•.Mark Fairfax-Harwood, Engineer Springvale Studios
Old 31st May 2006
  #34
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Yes, playing to a click and developing consistent timing is a fundamental skill that every musician should have. That's a given. So by all means practice to a click, - so that you don't need one during the actual performance. That's like riding the Tour de France with friggin training wheels. Just because you can play to a click doesn't mean you should, and just because someone doesn't like playing to one doesn't mean they can't. It just means they want the freedom to vary from the consistent tempo or wait another half a beat before coming back in from a break if they're feeling it that way, because it adds tension and excitement. If you're a slave to the click you can't do stuff like that.

The post about Tony Beard illustrates my point exactly. Good musicians don't need a click and bad ones can't follow one worth a damn anyway, so they're useless as far as I'm concerned, except as a count off device.
Old 31st May 2006
  #35
Smile OK I will tell you how its done by the Cognisenti Y'all.

"
Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier
Yes, playing to a click and developing consistent timing is a fundamental skill that every musician should have. or wait another half a beat before coming back in from a break if they're feeling it that way, because it adds tension and excitement. If you're a slave to the click you can't do stuff like that."

In the trade mate we would call that a push followed by an accelerando. Musically It should not move the next down beat.


"The post about Tony Beard illustrates my point exactly. Good musicians don't need a click and bad ones can't follow one worth a damn anyway, so they're useless as far as I'm concerned, except as a count off device.
"

Wrong if your trying to produce using any time dependant FX Delay, Gated Rev,
Compression. ETC.

Record the band playing live then write the bar chart taking careful note of time signatures in PT. Identify any necessary tempo changes and remove all the bar chart markers between them. Then place a click sample in a track and keep pressing (control D) until you have a patch at one tempo and quantise (control Y)
then do the same to the other tempos. Play the Click loud to the guitarist and record him. Drop in if he drifts. then play both to the drummer record what he plays in non destructive mode till his hands are sore then edit the drums out
of the crap and see if you have a drum track that his endorser will give him another free drum kit for next year. Then start putting the samples in place
in phase by hand. This is how to keep deities crowns from slipping and thus be high end. If you can do all that on 2" you can start recording metal. If not get yourself a mop haired beat group pop pickers.
Regards.•:*¨¨*:•. ¸¸.•´¯`•.Mark Fairfax-Harwood, Engineer Springvale Studios
Old 31st May 2006
  #36
Smile

i try to put as much


CaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAANYON


Re-VERBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB



with an EXTREMELY

OVERDRIVEN


Re-TUUUUUUURRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRNNNNNNN

everything above 200 hz TOTALLY ROLLED OFF


a 15 milisecond AUTO-PANNnnnnnnn


(and phase cancellation on every 3rd 8th note)


and EXTREMELY random
brass section BLASTS

(all highs rolled BACK IN, OF COURSE)


politely complemented by
HUMOUNGOID
glass SHATTERINGZ



on every, saaaaaay 63rd 64th note

(all highs rolled BACK IN, OF COURSE heh)


as POSSIBLE


on EVeRY click track I generate










i find this REALLY helps the drummers get the GROOOOOOOOOVE,

(which is so OBVIOUSLY MOSTLY REVERB-BASED)

and has them SINGING ME PRAISES TO THE HIGH HEAVENS


(i mostly use a piece of software called

"how 2 completely f&ck ANY drummer who's NOT chad wackerman").
Old 31st May 2006
  #37
Gear Addict
 
Bravin Neff's Avatar
 

I think people that believe the rule that says music (or musicians) needs to follow rigid time ought to think about the phenomenon that occurs when the same musicians come back (say, the next day, or the next hour, or the next month) and remark: "you know what? I think this song ought to be 3 bpms faster than we were playing it before."

Happens all the time. Happens to me. And they change the song. Was that wrong? In a very literal manner, they changed the tempo of the song, which echos the original complaint against some bad drummer whose badness, presumably, was due to the fact he changed the song's tempo. Turns out the "right tempo" was open to manipulation.

I cannot see how this is any more "wrong" than not playing consistently to a rigid time. In fact its not wrong. Its fair game. Just as speeding up and slowing down is. SRV has a song "Life by the Drop," played on acoustic guitar and solo voice. If you skip from the beginning to the end, you can hear an obvious speeding up that must have occurred. But it is impercepticble during the song, and the song (by my lights) is very powerful just the way it is. I can't imagine changing a thing about it. Somehow he broke a musical rule though?

It is not true.

HOWEVER, I certainly believe there is a line, and there is such a thing as bad timing; there is such a thing as bad musicianship, and some tempo changes (most of them?) are the result of such badness. That's fine, and the badness should be worked on. But that is not equivalent to showing the rule exists. There is no rule. That rule has been assumed into modern folklore by many (not all); it certainly has been widely adopted. But the rule doesn't exist except by those that demand that it does.

Getting technical on everyone's ass, even a computer can't keep perfect tempo. At the quantum level inside quartz crystals, timing variations exist. Is that "wrong" too, or is it okay since people can't hear it? Does the "wrong" have to be modified to mean only those changes that are perceptible by humans -- the ones perceptible by others are permissible?
Old 31st May 2006
  #38
Smile I don't make the rules.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bravin Neff
I think people that believe the rule that says music (or musicians) needs to follow rigid time ought to think about the phenomenon that occurs when the same musicians come back (say, the next day, or the next hour, or the next month) and remark: "you know what? I think this song ought to be 3 bpms faster than we were playing it before."

Happens all the time. Happens to me. And they change the song. Was that wrong? In a very literal manner, they changed the tempo of the song, which echos the original complaint against some bad drummer whose badness, presumably, was due to the fact he changed the song's tempo. Turns out the "right tempo" was open to manipulation.

I cannot see how this is any more "wrong" than not playing consistently to a rigid time. In fact its not wrong. Its fair game. Just as speeding up and slowing down is. SRV has a song "Life by the Drop," played on acoustic guitar and solo voice. If you skip from the beginning to the end, you can hear an obvious speeding up that must have occurred. But it is impercepticble during the song, and the song (by my lights) is very powerful just the way it is. I can't imagine changing a thing about it. Somehow he broke a musical rule though?

It is not true.

HOWEVER, I certainly believe there is a line, and there is such a thing as bad timing; there is such a thing as bad musicianship, and some tempo changes (most of them?) are the result of such badness. That's fine, and the badness should be worked on. But that is not equivalent to showing the rule exists. There is no rule. That rule has been assumed into modern folklore by many (not all); it certainly has been widely adopted. But the rule doesn't exist except by those that demand that it does.

Getting technical on everyone's ass, even a computer can't keep perfect tempo. At the quantum level inside quartz crystals, timing variations exist. Is that "wrong" too, or is it okay since people can't hear it? Does the "wrong" have to be modified to mean only those changes that are perceptible by humans -- the ones perceptible by others are permissible?
The slight tempo lift in the song is not a set tempo thing and is click free. The Punk band that starts at a furious tempo and slows slightly by the end of the song due to fatigue will need a click. This is to equalise the effect of the big stripe of marching powder he did just before he started the take. One of my bands perform live to a click because of the logistics of having had the string parts recorded by the Budapest Philharmonic rather than use sample strings. We think it sounds better and it makes the record company and tour manager happy. also as you can imagine thats a hell of a lot of Kebabs to find after a gig if you take them on tour.
Also have you considered the resultant farts. No I don't think you have.
Regards.•:*¨¨*:•. ¸¸.•´¯`•.Mark Fairfax-Harwood, Engineer Springvale Studios
Old 31st May 2006
  #39
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmec
In the trade mate we would call that a push followed by an accelerando. Musically It should not move the next down beat.
Oh it "shouldn't?" Says who? Fact is people do it all the time - my band just recorded a song in fact where there's a complete stop and then it starts up again, and we came back in whenever we damn well felt like it. I'm quite sure that where we came back in has no relation to where the original downbeat was, and I'm also quite sure that it was exactly the right thing to do for the song. Left to their own devices, good musicians will do this sort of thing all the time and make great music that way.

Quote:
Wrong if your trying to produce using any time dependant FX Delay, Gated Rev,
Compression. ETC.
1) I don't believe in compromising the musical performance for the sake of making the producer's or engineer's job easier.

2) As I mentioned previously, one can create a tempo map after the fact which can be used to sync up effects and/or sequencers, do editing, etc. Easiest way to do it is to have the drummer overdub a track of quarter notes on a cowbell or other sharp percussion throughout the whole song. The track isn't actually heard in the mix of course, but is only used as a guide or trigger. There's no need to make the whole band play to a click just so you can sync or edit stuff later.
Old 31st May 2006
  #40
Smile Clicks are better than death by Kebab farts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier
Oh it "shouldn't?" Says who? Fact is people do it all the time - my band just recorded a song in fact where there's a complete stop and then it starts up again, and we came back in whenever we damn well felt like it. I'm quite sure that where we came back in has no relation to where the original downbeat was, and I'm also quite sure that it was exactly the right thing to do for the song. Left to their own devices, good musicians will do this sort of thing all the time and make great music that way.



1) I don't believe in compromising the musical performance for the sake of making the producer's or engineer's job easier.

2) As I mentioned previously, one can create a tempo map after the fact which can be used to sync up effects and/or sequencers, do editing, etc. Easiest way to do it is to have the drummer overdub a track of quarter notes on a cowbell or other sharp percussion throughout the whole song. The track isn't actually heard in the mix of course, but is only used as a guide or trigger. There's no need to make the whole band play to a click just so you can sync or edit stuff later.
Well if you did the break to a click you could over dub it much more easily than just a guess as the drums go down. Put a track cut in all tracks and move it where you want. Have twenty different timings in twenty different mixes. All tight as old bollocks. I dont make the rules. I just get the record companys what they want.
Good solid tracks that don't sound like the band is on largactol.
Regards.•:*¨¨*:•. ¸¸.•´¯`•.Mark Fairfax-Harwood, Engineer Springvale Studios
Old 31st May 2006
  #41
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier
Oh it "shouldn't?" Says who? Fact is people do it all the time - my band just recorded a song in fact where there's a complete stop and then it starts up again, and we came back in whenever we damn well felt like it. I'm quite sure that where we came back in has no relation to where the original downbeat was, and I'm also quite sure that it was exactly the right thing to do for the song. Left to their own devices, good musicians will do this sort of thing all the time and make great music that way.
as a musician that would really bug me.
never heard a really good musician miss a the beat.
maybe drunk, stoned, or just beat from to many hrs.
Old 31st May 2006
  #42
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pan60
as a musician that would really bug me.
never heard a really good musician miss a the beat.
Wow. I don't guess you listen to many different kinds of music then. To think that any time a musician misses a beat it must be a mistake or would bug you... wow. That's kind of sad. Being able to play with the tempo on an improvisational basis is a whole mode of creative expression that for the past 20 years has been pretty much ignored or maligned. :(
Old 31st May 2006
  #43
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmec
Well if you did the break to a click you could over dub it much more easily than just a guess as the drums go down.
Well we prefer "more musically interesting" over "easier." And we didn't have to guess at anything - we had a vocal cue to lead back in and if we do any overdubs there we can just follow the vocal cue same as we did while tracking the basics.

Quote:
I dont make the rules. I just get the record companys what they want.
Well that's the problem isn't it? What record companies want these days is rarely very musical. Having done plenty of commercial sesssions I understand the problem of having a band that simply can't play in time when they need to, but that doesn't mean that one should default to the same techniques on every band just because some can't function without a click.
Old 31st May 2006
  #44
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier
Wow. I don't guess you listen to many different kinds of music then. To think that any time a musician misses a beat it must be a mistake or would bug you... wow. That's kind of sad. Being able to play with the tempo on an improvisational basis is a whole mode of creative expression that for the past 20 years has been pretty much ignored or maligned. :(
i listen to mostly jazz and big band lots of swing stuff.
i also listen to blues, rock, country, and classical.
i play jazz, blues, some older rock, and country.
many musicians choose to play behind a beat from time to time, i do, but i do not miss a beat.
Old 31st May 2006
  #45
Lives for gear
 
Dysanfel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by doorknocker
though I must say that COWBELL is by far the most popular.
I gotta have more COWBELL!
Old 31st May 2006
  #46
Lives for gear
 
mtstudios@charter's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier
Yes, playing to a click and developing consistent timing is a fundamental skill that every musician should have. That's a given. So by all means practice to a click, - so that you don't need one during the actual performance. That's like riding the Tour de France with friggin training wheels. Just because you can play to a click doesn't mean you should, and just because someone doesn't like playing to one doesn't mean they can't. It just means they want the freedom to vary from the consistent tempo or wait another half a beat before coming back in from a break if they're feeling it that way, because it adds tension and excitement. If you're a slave to the click you can't do stuff like that.

The post about Tony Beard illustrates my point exactly. Good musicians don't need a click and bad ones can't follow one worth a damn anyway, so they're useless as far as I'm concerned, except as a count off device.
Some genres of music demand a click. I will give you one example "Linken Park". You may not like them, but they did sell quite a few records. And that is how you make a good living as a Band, Record Producer or Engineer. By selling product.

I KNOW IT IS ART. AND I am not purporting playing to a click sells records (For those who don't read the entire thread)

www.bluethumbproductions.com
Old 31st May 2006
  #47
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pan60
i listen to mostly jazz and big band lots of swing stuff.
i also listen to blues, rock, country, and classical.
i play jazz, blues, some older rock, and country.
Have you ever tried loading any of that stuff into a DAW and seeing how far you get lining it up to a grid? Can you imagine doing classical or blues or jazz to a click? Haven't you ever noticed all the tempo changes and playing around with the beat location that is inherent in most of the music you listen to? If you don't, that means the musicians succeeded in their job - they simply moved you and made you forget about "the rules."
Old 31st May 2006
  #48
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected]
Some genres of music demand a click. I will give you one example "Linken Park". You may not like them, but they did sell quite a few records. And that is how you make a good living as a Band, Record Producer or Engineer. By selling product.

I KNOW IT IS ART. AND I am not purporting playing to a click sells records (For those who don't read the entire thread)
Well if you're not saying that, why bring it up? We all know many records have been sold where a click has been used, and many have also been sold where one hasn't been used. Sales should not determine artistic decisions, no?

I've already acknowledged there are some songs that work better with a click and some artists create more of those type of songs than others. My point is that many times now a click is used simply by default "because that's how it's done" or to make the producer's or engineer's job easier - not because it really serves the particular song or musicians best. In other words it's become the assumption that a click must be used and I don't think that's at all good for music.
Old 31st May 2006
  #49
Lives for gear
 
mtstudios@charter's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lflier
Well if you're not saying that, why bring it up? We all know many records have been sold where a click has been used, and many have also been sold where one hasn't been used. Sales should not determine artistic decisions, no?

I've already acknowledged there are some songs that work better with a click and some artists create more of those type of songs than others. My point is that many times now a click is used simply by default "because that's how it's done" or to make the producer's or engineer's job easier - not because it really serves the particular song or musicians best. In other words it's become the assumption that a click must be used and I don't think that's at all good for music.
I believe you are on the right track. While reading these posts it surprised me that some of the viewers here were so adamant about NOT using clicks, stating music suffers when a click is used. That is not ALWAYS true.

The right time to use a click is up to the Band, Producer or Engineer. This decision should be determined on vision not sales. I think Linken Park made the right decision and sales PARTLY proved that. If you ALWAYS do anything such as; use a click, you are not adapting to the specific project.

www.bluethumbproductions.com
Old 31st May 2006
  #50
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected]
I believe you are on the right track. While reading these posts it surprised me that some of the viewers here were so adamant about NOT using clicks, stating music suffers when a click is used. That is not ALWAYS true.
I think I'm the only one who's been adamant about it, and I never said it was ALWAYS true. I just said I'm personally sick of listening to stuff that's been cut with a click, that too often it is used for the wrong reasons, and that is bad for music. I also offered alternatives to using a click for anyone who presumes they need to use one for editing, syncing, band cues etc. Of course people are free to consider my point of view and either use it or not.

I personally have never found any "need" to use a click in my own music, and I provide one for my engineering clients only if they request it - if the artist or producer wants it then I give it to them, but I never insist on it, or use one by default, or presume it is necessary.
Old 31st May 2006
  #51
SK1
Lives for gear
 
SK1's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SK1
Playing to a click should be a CHOICE ..... if they can't play to one there really isn't a choice.
But I'll take the $$$.
Am I allowed to quote myself ?????

Also ..... The click track should follow the songwriting, not the other way around ...... ( when you CHOOSE to use a click ) . A great click track an be a producers best friend. Subdivide a certain part, use half the clicks on another, do the rudiment of the riff on another part .... 2 16ths and an 8th, triplets .....
whatever the part calls for and makes it feel right. Not just a click at the same tempo through the whole song. ( worked out in pre-pro )

By the way I have and will record without a click.

The truth is that 99% of the people, that I've dealt with, that complain about the click just can't do it on spot.

Then again ... James Brown and the greats are not booking alot of time here !!
LOL

Like the original poster said .... we're dealing with amatuers.

I love seeing all the different viewpoints though ........
Thanks people !!
Old 31st May 2006
  #52
SK1
Lives for gear
 
SK1's Avatar
 

Try this for fun ........

If you think you have "rock solid timing" .....
Take your song, say at good ole 120 bpm (1/4 note).... play it for a bit. Then, cut the click to 60 bpm (1/2 note) and keep playing at the same tempo ..... then cut to 30 bpm (whole note) and keep playing at the same tempo ... then 15 bpm and stay at the same tempo.

If you can rock it at 30bpm and 15bpm.... You'll get SK's official good timing stamp of approval.

Then go play without a click !!!!!

LOL
Old 31st May 2006
  #53
500 series nutjob
 
pan60's Avatar
 

well i really have little issues with bands speeding up or slowing down a few bpm, ( though it is a bother to me if a drummer dose so as it effects my ability to possible swing notes the way i my want ) but missing a beat just isn't right.

a click track keeps the drummer were i would like him, ( or her ) to be.
some drummers are solid and do not need a click track, evan if they my vary ever so slightly it is not really noticeable, i have no issues with their.
but if a click track put them dead on, well i am all for it, most i have found agree.
Old 19th September 2006
  #54
Lives for gear
 
cajonezzz's Avatar
 

Wow- strong opinions here!

I think that music suffers when played with a clik only when the players arent comfortable with it, which is often the case.

Best bet is to get to the point where the click is just another player-- a reference point.

I've heard some drummers with exceptional time ( clik friendly ) with **** feel, and vice versa.

I'll say it again, practice with one to develop TIME, listen back to analyze for FEEL and GROOVE, then go to the session and try with, and try with out.

From an AE stand point, theres no point in fighting the battle with a band that is not clik experienced, and if in a DAW like PT it's a no brainer to generate a tempo map. just may have to do it 4 bars at a time if stuff is floating.

No right answers here, although I think a lot of us have gotten screwed up by years of listening to clik/drum machine imposed music.

I'll often cut ( as a drummer ) sans clik, but using a visual aid ( Beat bug ) and just nudge the chorus up by a couple points... alot of times that gives the needed boost . I'll then generate a grid after the fact. Works well.

I'd say 90% of the time it's with a clik though, and it really just comes back to making friends with it. If your tracking a full band, drummer only on clik, it can be problematic if the headphone mix makes it easy for the drummer to get swayed, or if the other players are monitoring clik too loud and interpreting the time in a less than accurate way ( like rushing guitar players)
]
Good time is everyones job, but seems to be overlooked by many.


cz
Old 28th November 2006
  #55
Lives for gear
 
gregohb's Avatar
 

She Loves You

Geof Emerick, an engineer for the Beatles, remarked about how great the energy was on "She Loves You (yeah, yeah, yeah)". I tried to tempo match that song in Logic Pro, and its all over the place - the tempo changes quite a bit, bar by bar. Maybe someone else can try it too.
Old 28th November 2006
  #56
Lives for gear
 
gregohb's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmec View Post
""

Wrong if your trying to produce using any time dependant FX Delay, Gated Rev,
Compression. ETC.
s
Most delays and tremolos and such on a DAW will sync to the midi tempo, so you can have all the tempo changes you want, and ideally all tempo syncing should keep lined up.
Old 28th November 2006
  #57
Lives for gear
 
Bounce's Avatar
I agree with both of you.















yeah, you two
Old 28th November 2006
  #58
Gear Guru
 
FFTT's Avatar
 

I agree that timing is critical, but after many many hours of solo recording, I wish there
was an alternative to "click"

I personally prefer to use a hi hat or a shaker, not only to keep my timing, but to also add a bit of feel to the sequence as I'm working with it.

Once I lay down a scratch hi hat track, then I use the sequencer's time correction
to make sure it's "on"

From there, I just keep building the rhythm tracks.

It sure would be helpful if there was a VST/RTAS program that allowed you to select
from numerous pre recorded hi hat sequences, just to help you lay out a song.

Everyone has a different way of working, but for a non drummer technophobe,
I would find this extremely helpful and much less irritatiing than the "click" sound.
Old 28th November 2006
  #59
Moderator
 
toolskid's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FFTT View Post
I agree that timing is critical, but after many many hours of solo recording, I wish there
was an alternative to "click"

I personally prefer to use a hi hat or a shaker, not only to keep my timing, but to also add a bit of feel to the sequence as I'm working with it.

Once I lay down a scratch hi hat track, then I use the sequencer's time correction
to make sure it's "on"

From there, I just keep building the rhythm tracks.

It sure would be helpful if there was a VST/RTAS program that allowed you to select
from numerous pre recorded hi hat sequences, just to help you lay out a song.

Everyone has a different way of working, but for a non drummer technophobe,
I would find this extremely helpful and much less irritatiing than the "click" sound.
Bfd would be pretty rocking for this!
Old 28th November 2006
  #60
Gear Guru
 
FFTT's Avatar
 

Thanks, I'll have to look into it.

Affordable is the other requirement.

Already have iDrum, but haven't really gotten the hang of it.

I was so grateful to get Big Daddy's sample library, but apparently I've placed
the samples in the wrong folder.

They're in the .wav format.

I can't seem to access them via ProTools M-Powered or Cubase.

Running OS X 10.4.8
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