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How do Snare drums vary
Old 25th August 2007
  #1
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How do Snare drums vary

That is to say, how do the snare drums that sound good to record vary in sound?

Like what is the spectrum?
Old 25th August 2007
  #2
they vary in pretty much every way. you have tight, thin, piccolo sounds (i.e. 14 x 3 ala 311) or deep fat sounds (think 14 x8 with slack heads ala Tom Petty). A snare can ring, or it can be dry, it can have a tone or sound like a cardboard box. The tone can sound like wood or metal (different metal has different sounds). Maybe you need to be more specific in what you are asking?
Old 26th August 2007
  #3
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I tend to like fat wood snares.

I'm just wondering how that realm of drum can vary. I guess it would be something like from wet to dry sounding in the area.
Old 26th August 2007
  #4
a lot of it can be head choice and tuning on each drum too. For example, a coated ambassador (or equiv) vs. something like an Evans "Dry" or Remo PowerStroke (with the dot) can produce very different tones. the coated ambassador wwill be much more open or ringy sounding then the others.

If you like that fat dry sound, try one of those Evans Dry heads on a deep wood snare then tune to your likeness. it will probably get you there.
Old 27th August 2007
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitaldrummer View Post
a lot of it can be head choice and tuning on each drum too. For example, a coated ambassador (or equiv) vs. something like an Evans "Dry" or Remo PowerStroke (with the dot) can produce very different tones. the coated ambassador wwill be much more open or ringy sounding then the others.

If you like that fat dry sound, try one of those Evans Dry heads on a deep wood snare then tune to your likeness. it will probably get you there.
Wow. I never would've thought of that. Of course, I'm not a drummer.

Thanks DD
Old 27th August 2007
  #6
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Speaking of this topic...this is why guys typically say that the ludwig Supra snare is great for the studio. It sounds pretty good with a variety of different tunings, heads, etc. In an ideal world, a Supra, vintage Black Beauty and a wooden Rogers Dynasonic and you'd be set for studio snares.


later,

m
Old 13th October 2007
  #7
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I'm also a non-drummer wondering what I might consider buying to get that
fat Ringo snare sound in a recording.

I understand that I could buy software with a multitude of kits, but having one
real snare is something I've considered to take the drudgery out of sequencing.
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