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E-Drum Recording
Old 29th May 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
E-Drum Recording

Hi everyone,

I run my own project studio out of some extra space in my house, and it isn't really conducive to recording an acoustic drum kit, so I've settled on the idea of using an electric kit to record drums for my songs. I've basically already decided on using Superior Drummer 3 as my sampling software, but I'm a little torn on what e-drum kit to use to trigger it. Right now, I'm torn between the Roland TD-50K and the Alesis Strike Pro. I was wondering if any of you who do e-drum studio recording have any experience with one or the other as it pertains to recording through SD3, or just general quality of the kits overall. One main concern of mine is the tremendous price difference ($5,000 for the Roland and $2,200 for the Strike Pro). I understand that a big part of this comes from the fact that the Roland has a digital ride and snare, but I just wan't sure if that makes much of a difference when using sample libraries through SD3 as opposed to the onboard module samples. To be clear, I never intend to use whichever kit I end up buying for anything besides recording digital drums to my DAW. I am therefore uninterested in hearing arguments about how each kit's built-in samples sound, as I will never use them, nor am I interested in how each one performs as a live kit.

Basically, the main question I have - is the Roland TD-50K worth the extra cost over the Alesis Strike Pro when looking only at using each kit as a trigger for Superior Drummer 3?

(p.s., something else I have heard mixed things about is the Strike Pro hi hat not functioning properly. I'm very interested in getting reliable and realistic triggering of the SD3 samples, and if anyone knows which kit is able to more reliably trigger the SD3 samples, and for what value, that is what I am most interested in finding out. Thanks so much for reading!)
Old 29th May 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
 

I use a Roland Kit with SD2, great combination!

I bought a V-Drum kit when they first came out, ~15 years ago.
I'm using a TD-10 brain with 8 inch mesh pads from the TD-8 kit, had to keep it small as I was in an apartment at the time.

Most of the setup for make playing accurate is done in the brain, sensitivity, velocity, threshold, cross-talk settings, etc. When I started with SD2 I had to play around with these a bit but as I'm used to my mesh pads, my playing style is different from when I used to play a real kit. Acoustic drums feel like a lot of work when I play them now!

Cymbal choke and hi hat variability are really the only things missing. Not sure if those have been addressed with newer kits or SD3. The TD-10 picks up these controls for the internal sounds but does not pass them through MIDI for me.

As for the physical kit, I've had to replace all of the mounts for the pads, the ones that originally came with the kit were plastic and a few broke through my first few years with it, now I've got all Gibraltar hardware and it's much better.

Also, after 15 years, the foam in my kick pad that covers the piezo has dried out and needs to be replaced. Besides that and a new battery in the brain, no issues. Very well built kit.

I'd recommend getting the best Roland kit you can afford. That being said, I have zero experience with other E-kits other than a friend who made his own pads from old tom shells, which were amazing to play, even better than the Roland products I've tried. You can look up DIY pads online, basically saw an old tom in half for 2 shallow shells, install a brace to hold the piezo, add a 1/4 inch jack, foam cone and a mesh skin and you have a way cheaper pad that will play just as nice. Maybe an option if you're handy.
Old 30th May 2019
  #3
Here for the gear
 

I would say, if budget is not a problem, then go with Roland. Because - unfortunately - Alesis is not known for putting out quality stuff, so you will likely have issues with the Alesis (like I did). Roland on the other hand is known for making stuff that's built like a tank and will last you years.

From my experience with TD-50, I had no problems jumping right in and using it, just take the time to setup your triggers. I had no issues with triggering, the TD-50 picks up everything. I was using the digital snare and ride which takes the module to another level but I also tried it with my aDrums and it worked really well. I like the sounds on the TD-50 and was able to build some nice kits, there is a lot you can do to shape the sounds.

Though, sounds and pad feel are very personal to each drummer, that's why I'd recommend you to go out and try some kits. Though I found some Strike Pro samples (however, i am not impressed by the sound quality) in case you're still interested.

Good luck!

Last edited by thunderlane; 3rd June 2019 at 03:26 AM.. Reason: mistypes + added info
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