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Sell me on an electronic drum kit DAW Software
Old 14th October 2018
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Sell me on an electronic drum kit

I have neither the $$$ nor the sound proofing to get a real kit so I want an electronic kit to practice on. It must have the following:

1) Ability to use two kick pedals for double bass
2) Hopefully be expandable to add more cymbals or an extra tom
3) Have a real 5-pin din midi out, NOT USB!
4) Used, to get it cheaper

What fits this criteria? Gonna pick it up this week.
Old 16th October 2018
  #2
Not sure if it has 5 pin midi, but the Roland TD17 is great value.
You can import samples too.

Given your main criteria, I don't know whether you should worry about the midi connector.
Old 16th October 2018
  #3
Gear Head
I wish I could. Honestly I have a decent Roland kit and its great for getting ideas. Its great for practice too. But when it comes to recording it lacks. I have it running through Slate drums and the sounds are incredible BUT it does not feel like a real kit no matter how hard you try. The bounce is very different than real heads and cymbals and that doesn't sound like a huge deal but when you get into a recording situation you get hardly any feel in your recording.
Old 16th October 2018
  #4
OP said ‘for practice’
Old 26th October 2018
  #5
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Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSLand View Post
Gonna pick it up this week.
Then get whatever's in stock at the local Guitar Center/Sam Ash megastore. If you're going to rush into this it doesn't make much difference what electro-kit you get

...mostly because I guarantee that within a year you're going to hate it.
Old 8th February 2019
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaked4ge View Post
I wish I could. Honestly I have a decent Roland kit and its great for getting ideas. Its great for practice too. But when it comes to recording it lacks. I have it running through Slate drums and the sounds are incredible BUT it does not feel like a real kit no matter how hard you try. The bounce is very different than real heads and cymbals and that doesn't sound like a huge deal but when you get into a recording situation you get hardly any feel in your recording.
When you use it with Slate, what's your connection setup for controlling the Slate kits?

Are you working in a DAW when you do?

I'm researching getting an electronic kit to use in Pro Tools to trigger/record Slate drum sounds. Any info you can provide would be much appreciated.
Old 8th February 2019
  #7
The Slate sounds are already in the brain of a Pearl Mimic kit.
Otherwise, you just launch Slate as a plug-in (virtual instrument) in Pro Tools and use your v-drum midi output (to midi in on the computer) to play Slate sounds.
(Just like a master keyboard would)
Old 8th February 2019
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
The Slate sounds are already in the brain of a Pearl Mimic kit.
Otherwise, you just launch Slate as a plug-in (virtual instrument) in Pro Tools and use your v-drum midi output (to midi in on the computer) to play Slate sounds.
(Just like a master keyboard would)
Thanks, Chrisso.

Any recs on a good e-kit for this type of use? Any pros/cons for any brands etc.
Old 8th February 2019
  #9
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octatonic's Avatar
They all suck, don't do it.

If you want something for practice then get a regular drum kit and swap out the heads for mesh and the cymbals for low volume cymbals.
Electronic kits have the wrong feel and the wrong ergonomics.
You are always working against the technology and when you go back to a real kit your technique is off.

A mesh/low volume cymbal kit the best approach.
I say this as a former owner of a TD30K and a current owner of a TD50K.
I use them for recording but for practice I use the mesh/lvc kit.

Real kits are usually cheaper, especially used.
A Yamaha Stage Custom is a good first kit to go for.
Old 8th February 2019
  #10
For practice I tend to agree. Also, you don't need Slate sounds for practice.
Recommendation? Roland TD17, affordable, works well and really well built.
For Slate? Pearl Mimic.
Old 8th February 2019
  #11
Gear Head
 
PDXOR's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by octatonic View Post
They all suck, don't do it.

If you want something for practice then get a regular drum kit and swap out the heads for mesh and the cymbals for low volume cymbals.
Electronic kits have the wrong feel and the wrong ergonomics.
You are always working against the technology and when you go back to a real kit your technique is off.

A mesh/low volume cymbal kit the best approach.
I say this as a former owner of a TD30K and a current owner of a TD50K.
I use them for recording but for practice I use the mesh/lvc kit.

Real kits are usually cheaper, especially used.
A Yamaha Stage Custom is a good first kit to go for.
I agree with this 1000%, 2 totally different beasts and if you're going to practice, practice on the kit you want to get better on.
Old 9th February 2019
  #12
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
For practice I tend to agree. Also, you don't need Slate sounds for practice.
Recommendation? Roland TD17, affordable, works well and really well built.
For Slate? Pearl Mimic.
Thanks again. This is great info to have.

So that I'm clear, the Pearl Mimic is simply a module one would use with any independent kit? Like, the Roland TD17 kit you mentioned...It would come with it's own "brains"/module, but one could use the Pearl Mimic instead?

Am I understanding that correctly?
Old 9th February 2019
  #13
Pearl Mimic is a complete e-kit. A rival to the Roland V-drums.
It's expensive, but uses a drum sample library (Slate) rather than Roland's modelling tech.
With the Roland TD17 you can import samples as well.
The TD17 is pretty good and very affordable.
Old 9th February 2019
  #14
Lives for gear
Another vote for "Don't do it"

Edrums cost more than real drums to get a decent feel out of them. Go for mesh heads and convert your real drums to practice. Find some cracked Cymbals and rivit gum rubber sheets on top.

If you play with electric kit sounds, your skills on a real kit will not be as good. The triggers lie to you about your real drum playing ability. Triggers don't like to be hit at more than 40% of real rock and roll drum volume. You have to use ligher sticks to compensate. Training should use heavier sticks.

side note: Practicing on a bowl of water give you great control! Try the Double peradidle with a triplet feel on water

I have a high end E-kit, here is where I ended up:
KD 140 kick with trick double bass pedal
Two 14" DDT mesh head
Hart mesh head 8,10,12,13
Roland CY15R (x4)
CY13hats
Pintech Visulite 21" ride
TD-30, TMC6, Megadrum brains

That kit actually feels half like a real kit, but I am $10K in.
PC with MADI converters to get fast audio. MIDI is through copperlan

Triggers want 3ms to decide how loud they are hit. Each ms, is same as 1' of distance between you and the source.
Only heavy triggers are good. With light triggers, you have use crosstalk, and time between hit settings to get decent triggering. You will spend tons of time dialing in the kit and not get practice done. The brains are getting better, but the triggers still suck.

The best triggers are the Inhead/onhead system. But they don't use the Roland & Yamaha rim/head switch system with note numbers. The pear system is good considering the built in ability to use samples. But how much space does it have? My BFD sounds take up 0.5 TB of space.

For the cash....15 year old roland brains are not that much different that the TD30...get an old TD12
For the feel Yamaha gell pads are not bad

Yamaha and Roland do not work together as you mix and match triggers. I'm not sure how Pearl triggers are wired. Historically you are either Yamaha or Roland....cant be blended.

If you go software and DYI triggers, use the TMC6
Megadrum is cost effective brain that is set up on the PC. Then you can have trigger settings and sound settings on the monitor.


One trick I like to use is splitting one trigger into two dual inputs. Tune one for the head and one for the rim and blend the sounds. Then you can get a real rimshot. This was easy on a TD 20 using a headphone splitter.

TD-20's are cheap now, and the VEX sounds improve the sound quality a bit.

Go check out the V-drum forum.

Last edited by elegentdrum; 9th February 2019 at 10:40 AM..
Old 17th February 2019
  #15
Lives for gear
 

What is your budget? I use Atv Adrums with the Pearl Mimic module. It is the most realistic I have had but expensive. The Alesis Strike pro sounds pretty good and would give you larger sizes. You can import multi velocity sample libraries into it even though it is not the most expensive kit. The Td17 is a goid kit for the price too.
Old 17th February 2019
  #16
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EvilRoy's Avatar
Use practice pads. E-kits suck. Gotta/wanna use an E-kit? Use real cymbals. They only put out high frequencies and are fairly easy to sound isolate.
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