The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Keeping analog sound
Old 3rd August 2020
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Keeping analog sound

Please,in case you produce music mostly with hardware instruments and analog devices, could you share how you do for recording your projects, keep all the analog sound , and then send it for mastering to an audio engineer?

I mean , which is your workflow, once the audio signal leaves your mix console , and you prepare it for sending to a mastering engineer ?

Regards

Last edited by diegaso; 3rd August 2020 at 04:46 PM.. Reason: Gramatical concerns
Old 4th August 2020
  #2
Gear Head
 

Cassette, Orbital style!
Old 4th August 2020
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by specialjustin View Post
Cassette, Orbital style!
Reading an interview here : https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sou...al-chime%3famp

You are right , DAT recorder ,dont ?
Old 5th August 2020
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Barfunkel's Avatar
 

If purism is important, maybe get a Studer A80 or other such master tape recorder? There are mastering engineers who still accept tapes. Find one who does and masters fully analog, then send directly to a vinyl pressing plant after he's done.

Other than that, converters of today are of high quality. I'm fairly certain you can't tell a difference between the signal you monitor from your mixer and the signal that you record with a decent converter. Even a cheap-ish one.

Then again, a fully analog signal path is a rarity nowadays. Even vinyl releases go digital at some point in (at least) like 99% of cases. It's extremely rare for the full record manufacturing AND the listening environment being fully analog.

And anyways, awesome sounding synths (be it analog or digital) sound awesome even on youtube, listening through the headphone output of a cheap laptop or phone, using 5€ earbuds. Whether people like your music or not has very little to do with anything being analog.
Old 6th August 2020
  #5
Gear Head
These days, I think it's fair to say your music is going to become digital at some point, the important areas are the very first parts of the process; analog sound generation (oscillators) and processing (EQs and compressors). Agree with the previous reply, the important aspect is the quality of the converter used the first time it becomes digital and also ensure you gain stage properly and keep lots of headroom in the file going to the mastering house.
Old 7th August 2020
  #6
Lives for gear
 
NawSon's Avatar
 

I know of at least one vinyl mastering place that will master from cassette tape. They also can go all analog for the processing before cutting. I’m sure more will use a reel and be able to do the same.

Your music doesn’t HAVE TO be digitally encoded at any point in the manufacturing process unless you want it to be.
Old 7th August 2020
  #7
HSi
Lives for gear
 
HSi's Avatar
 

Digital is fine as long as it's done properly. If you were to bounce, at the correct sample settings into Izotope rx via a decent, mid range, new, converter, you should defo not be able to measure any difference or loose anything, that's not to say an experienced ME, with Focal Stellas and a Prism wouldn't say the difference is night and day :P
Old 8th August 2020
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Thank you by allá comments, reading.
Old 20th August 2020
  #9
Gear Addict
 

It's not 2002 anymore. Digital audio is pretty damn good at accurate capture of analog signals.

"Analog" sound is going to come from your instruments and your mixer. Make sure you have a good pair of converters to capture the signal. From there it's just a matter of making sure your mastering engineer uses their tools correctly.

If there is any weak link in the chain, it's overloaded plating and pressing plants.

The only way you will have trouble with analog sound is if you use virtual instruments and effects and mix completely ITB. Hell, in 2020 it's getting easier and easier to fudge the sound and make ITB sound like hardware.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #10
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coleman Young View Post
The only way you will have trouble with analog sound is if you use virtual instruments and effects and mix completely ITB.
why should he have trouble with this? I think alot of people work this way with no problems at all.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #11
IEC
Gear Nut
 
IEC's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by loopdude View Post
why should he have trouble with this? I think alot of people work this way with no problems at all.
not the most efficient way to get an "analog sound" though
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
HSi
Lives for gear
 
HSi's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by loopdude View Post
why should he have trouble with this? I think alot of people work this way with no problems at all.
Hmmm, do they though? How many extra plug ins do they add to emulate something entirely natural?

I haven't heard a single plug in that does dbus distortion as convincingly as even my Soundcraft mixer.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by loopdude View Post
why should he have trouble with this? I think alot of people work this way with no problems at all.
I am not coming from a purist perspective where I **** on how other people work.

I am just saying that if you specifically want the sound of a 909 being recorded to a tape deck, recording a 909 with a tape deck will sound exactly like that just by virtue of being that.

Can you get results that are damn near identical completely ITB? I'd imagine so if you already know how to emulate all the quirks of a 909 and a tape deck. The software tools are really, really good in 2020.

Hardware already sounds like hardware with no additional effort, software can get you to the same place but it takes a little more work and knowledge.

If you are not striving for a pure hardware sound, then it really doesn't matter what you use. The state of the art has gotten to the point where even software that sounds like software sounds really good. It's not 2003 anymore, back in the day ITB sounded vastly inferior to hardware.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #14
I mainly just use ableton live lite for editing and exporting mp3 or wav files. I record and mix with the hardware then print the recording onto DAW.
Attached Thumbnails
Keeping analog sound-20200907_123425.jpg  
📝 Reply

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 1969 views: 285921
Avatar for rob S
rob S 25th June 2019
replies: 217 views: 49421
Avatar for Leverson
Leverson 7th June 2014
replies: 56 views: 11855
Avatar for burns46824
burns46824 6th June 2019
replies: 92 views: 10657
Avatar for Fidelis
Fidelis 4 days ago
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
🖨️ Show Printable Version
✉️ Email this Page
🔍 Search thread
🎙️ View mentioned gear
Forum Jump
Forum Jump