The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8 Control Surfaces
Old 3rd October 2017
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8

I’ve just bought a Command 8 but it doesn’t come with a power supply. Anyone got one for sale or know where I could find one? They seem difficult to come by.
Old 3rd October 2017
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Apparently they have become virtually unobtainable: Digidesign part # 400012818 -00
However, the specifications seem pretty common, 24VAC, center-tapped @ 1.5A

The only unconventional part is that connector.
It looks like it might be a 3-pin "aviation connector" like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G9YOHF4
There are also many of them on Ebay. Some via slow-boat from China, and some from sellers in America, etc.
Your user profile does not include your location, so that is a mystery to us.

If we could find the proper mating connector, it wouldn't be too difficult to simply make a replacement supply.
And likely better than the original.
It is the kind of project that is pretty simple for the "maker community".

Those connectors on Amazon are not terribly expensive.
If somebody could try them on their Command 8, they would be doing the community a great service.
We could end the dilemma of making replacement supplies for the Command 8.
Old 3rd October 2017
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
Apparently they have become virtually unobtainable: Digidesign part # 400012818 -00
However, the specifications seem pretty common, 24VAC, center-tapped @ 1.5A

The only unconventional part is that connector.
It looks like it might be a 3-pin "aviation connector" like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G9YOHF4
There are also many of them on Ebay. Some via slow-boat from China, and some from sellers in America, etc.
Your user profile does not include your location, so that is a mystery to us.

If we could find the proper mating connector, it wouldn't be too difficult to simply make a replacement supply.
And likely better than the original.
It is the kind of project that is pretty simple for the "maker community".

Those connectors on Amazon are not terribly expensive.
If somebody could try them on their Command 8, they would be doing the community a great service.
We could end the dilemma of making replacement supplies for the Command 8.
I’m in the UK. Thanks for your help!
Old 3rd October 2017
  #4
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
Apparently they have become virtually unobtainable: Digidesign part # 400012818 -00
However, the specifications seem pretty common, 24VAC, center-tapped @ 1.5A

The only unconventional part is that connector.
It looks like it might be a 3-pin "aviation connector" like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01G9YOHF4
There are also many of them on Ebay. Some via slow-boat from China, and some from sellers in America, etc.
Your user profile does not include your location, so that is a mystery to us.

If we could find the proper mating connector, it wouldn't be too difficult to simply make a replacement supply.
And likely better than the original.
It is the kind of project that is pretty simple for the "maker community".

Those connectors on Amazon are not terribly expensive.
If somebody could try them on their Command 8, they would be doing the community a great service.
We could end the dilemma of making replacement supplies for the Command 8.
FOund a connector for £3! 3 pin Aviation connector looks like the one! I’ve not got a lot of experience with this kind of DIY. Could you instruct me?
Old 3rd October 2017
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

There are several critical things to make this happen.
1) Find a mating connector for the Command 8 (which you seem to have completed successfully)
2) Find a suitable transformer to replace the missing power brick. For example: | RS Pro 50VA 2 Output Chassis Mounting Transformer, 12V ac | seems like it would be suitable.
3) Figure out the "pinout" of the 3-pin connector. Which pin is the common or center-tap of the two 12-volt windings? It is possible this could be connected to ground and you could identify it with an inexpensive DMM meter. Or perhaps by opening it up and tracing where the wires are going? This is a very important thing to work out because getting it wrong could ruin the device.
4) Put the transformer into some suitable enclosure to protect it, and to protect users from electrocution. I would use something like this: 1591DBK | 1591 ABS Enclosure, IP54, 150 x 80 x 50mm | Hammond But please search through the listings and select a box that is big enough to fit the transformer you select. I just used this one as an example. It is not necessarily big enough for that transformer. I didn't spend any time doing detailed research for you.
5) I would probably use a IEC-style power connector (which you Brits call a "kettle cord") It is the standard kind of power cord used on computers, monitors, printers, etc. Or you could just hard-wire a power cord
6) You need to solder the power mains wires to the "0V/230V" pins on the transformer, and then solder a 3-wire cord from the output ("secondary") of the transformer to the 3-pin connector.

This is all rather simple stuff, but it may be intimidating for someone who hasn't done something like this before. Certainly you must take extra care to make something that is safe since it is connected to the power mains. For example, I would connect the green-wire safety ground from the mains power cord to the metal frame of the transformer. That would give you some measure of protection against accidental contact with dangerous power.

I selected RS as a typical source of electronic components in the UK. But there are likely other sources besides RS. I am not that familiar with sources in your part of the planet. Since this forum is based in London and there are many UK participants here, perhaps you could find someone local to help you?
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Here for the gear
Power supply....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post

This is all rather simple stuff, but it may be intimidating for someone who hasn't done something like this before. Certainly you must take extra care to make something that is safe since it is connected to the power mains. For example, I would connect the green-wire safety ground from the mains power cord to the metal frame of the transformer. That would give you some measure of protection against accidental contact with dangerous power.

I selected RS as a typical source of electronic components in the UK. But there are likely other sources besides RS. I am not that familiar with sources in your part of the planet. Since this forum is based in London and there are many UK participants here, perhaps you could find someone local to help you?
Are you saying that this power supply can be made at home? I have contacted everyone and their mother to find one. If I am correct, you are saying a person only needs: 1 transformer, 1 aviation connector, 1 IEC cable? I have dabbled in minor electronics wiring before.... but always had a schematic.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Well I have made several power supplies like this at home. It doesn't seem like rocket surgery to me, but I am an inveterate hardware hacker.

The barriers to making one of these appear to be (most critical to least critical)
1) What is the "pinout" of that power connector? Which pin goes where? It does not appear to be documented anywhere. If you don't have 100% confidence here you run a serious risk of damaging the Command 8.
2) What is the mating connector? Is it really as simple as a generic "aircraft connector"? If so then you are lucky. Many of those oddball connectors are so rare, you might never find one.
3) Exactly what is the power (voltage and current) requirement for each power bus?
4) Can you find a mains transformer that will output the required voltage and current?
5) Mounting the transformer in an appropriate enclosure to make it safe to connect to the power mains.

Did you buy one of those connectors and try it to see if it mates with your Command 8?
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Here for the gear
Threw the dice and bought one on ebay for $130 with no power supply. How critical is matching the exact power rating +/- volts or mA?
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

I wouldn't vary more than +/- 5% on the voltage. You can have more current available. The gadget will draw only as much current as it actually needs, regardless of how much is available. But we still don't know the pinout or the connector. And I have little confidence in the voltage and current specs.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
I wouldn't vary more than +/- 5% on the voltage. You can have more current available.
Lets say that I found a nearly-identical power supply; same connector, same dual output other than the differences below:
Command 8. Ps. - Alternate Ps
30w-----------------------------37w
1.5a-----------------------------1.2a
0.7a----------------------------0.6a
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Same PINOUT?
Same VOLTAGES?

What is the actual load of the Command8?
Without that information, no way of knowing whether your 1.2A or 0.6A is sufficient????

Missing critical information to allow proper evaluation.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
Same PINOUT?
Same VOLTAGES?

What is the actual load of the Command8?
Without that information, no way of knowing whether your 1.2A or 0.6A is sufficient????

Missing critical information to allow proper evaluation.
12vac is listed for the Command 8. The alt power supply lists 15vac.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Here for the gear
The socket fits. Everything is in the photos. Will the 7 extra Watts in the mix be an issue?
Attached Thumbnails
Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171206_155506.jpg   Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171206_153023.jpg   Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171206_160121.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

The issue is not "7 extra Watts"
The issue is supplying 15V to something that is designed for 12V.
There are three possible outcomes if you attempt this:
1) You will blow up the power supply (or the circuits) inside the Command 8 with more voltage than it was designed for.
2) The Command 8 power supply (and/or circuits) will continue to operate, but at a higher temperature since the internal voltage regulators will be converting the over-voltage to heat and they may not be designed the heat-sinking to tolerate the elevated temperature. Electronic circuits which operate at elevated temperatures typically have shorter life expectancy.
3) The Command 8 will have no problem at all.

Note there is also the issue of the PINOUT.
Neither the original nor the substitute wall-wart provide information about how the connector is wired.
So, even if the connector fits, we have no apparent information whether they are wired the same?

We just don't have enough information to make any kind of educated guess what might happen here.
And there is a significant risk of burning up the Command 8 internal power supply and/or circuits.
So you must make that decision if it is worth the risk.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
Here for the gear
Any safe way to figure the pinout part out? Would a simple peek inside do the job?
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

A "simple" peek would be unlikely to reveal any significantly helpful information. You would certainly need to establish the pinout of the power connector, and reverse-engineer the power supply circuit. It is probably not an enormously complex power supply, but not something an amateur could do reliably. If I had one, I could make a video about how to solve these kinds of problems.
Old 1 week ago
  #17
Here for the gear
So, building from scratch seems to be the way to go. From your previous posts, it seems the necessary pieces of the puzzle are: transformer, IEC connector/cable, aviation connector, housing enclosure.?

Does the transformer in the photo meet criteria? That is the only item involved that I have little knowledge on with specs..
Attached Thumbnails
Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-8405fb65-42f8-47dc-a1ad-c1c72f649080.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #18
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

That transformer has two 12V secondary (output) windings. When connected together in parallel, it is good for 2A. But when used individually, the windings are good for 1A each. The original transformer has one of the outputs at 0.7A, so a transformer capable of 1A is fine. But the other output is rated at 1.5A, so a 1A capacity of the other winding is insufficient by half.

Most generic transformers have "symmetrical" output windings. Like the one in your example. So, in order to have one of the outputs capable of 1.5A, you probably will need a transformer with a pair of 12V @ 1.5A windings, although 2A is a more common rating. So a transformer with a pair of 12V @ 2A windings would be suitable. I cant help thinking that there are probably "wall wart" gadgets out there with a pair of 12V @ 2A outputs, but it may take years to find one.

tl;dr use a transformer with two 12V @ 2A output windings.
Old 2 days ago
  #19
Here for the gear
Given the "schematic" found somewhere in this mess... Does my result seem correct?

I used the 671-9090 Toroidal transformer. Everything is mounted in an old alarm clock...
Attached Thumbnails
Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171212_122352.jpg   Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171212_122052.jpg   Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171212_123048.jpg  
Old 2 days ago
  #20
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Execpt for the output connector, Yes, your diagram looks correct.
We don't have any official word (or empirical research) that the pinout of the 3-pin power connector is correct?
Do we know for sure that the "center-tap" is the middle pin? If this is wrong, you could easily burn up the internal circuits.

For those in other parts of the planet, note that @golden_ears diagram shows the transformer connected for 115V mains voltage.
You would use a different connection for the primary (input windings) of the transformer for 230V mains.
The 230V mains would connect to the brown and violet wires, while the blue and green wires would be connected together and isolated.
(i.e. the primary windings in parallel for 115V and in series for 230V)
Old 2 days ago
  #21
Here for the gear
So pin 2 is the center tap. Are the other 2 pins not interchangeable?
Old 2 days ago
  #22
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
Do we know for sure that the "center-tap" is the middle pin? If this is wrong, you could easily burn up the internal ccircuits.
The post that the diagram came from claims it has worked.
Old 2 days ago
  #23
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by golden_ears View Post
The post that the diagram came from claims it has worked.
On that basis, it looks good.

Quote:
So pin 2 is the center tap. Are the other 2 pins not interchangeable?
The place where the two windings connect together is the "center tap". The critical detail is which pin is the center tap. It appears that pin 2 is it. Yes, the other two pins are interchangable. In fact, they "interchange" (alternate) 60 times every second in North America. (or 50 times elsewhere) since it is AC.
Old 2 days ago
  #24
Here for the gear
Tested it out. So far, so good...
Attached Thumbnails
Power Supply for Digidesign Command 8-img_20171212_194726.jpg  
Old 1 day ago
  #25
Here for the gear
Thanks Richard!
Mentioned Products
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump