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Reaper vs Studio one
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Nut
 
fairchildren's Avatar
 

Reaper vs Studio one

Looking for experience users in both to give a break down of the differences... Is there anything Reaper can't do that Studio One can?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Head
 

I've been using Studio One since 3 ish and use Reaper some time for collaboration. Both are powerful and stable (I'm on mac), where Studio One is more streamlined and has a certain workflow available, yet Reaper is more like you need to find your own way among the potentials and flexibility. Price wise, Reaper wins hands down, but I stick to Studio One as my main daw as I find myself more efficient and can focus more on the creativity activity than when I'm on Reaper. Studio One is often on sale for 50% off on Black Friday, might be a good time if you'd like a get a copy. Or Splice has a rent-to-own option for 24 month. Don't go for Presonus Sphere, unless you want the whole ecosystem.
Old 4 weeks ago | Show parent
  #3
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Muser's Avatar
Reaper is such a low price that, if you're willing to pay for studio one, then get studio one.
take it a little easier on your meth habit, and get Reaper in a couple of days after.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #4
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fairchildren's Avatar
 

Thanks... yeah i have downloaded both... and so far Studio One seems so intuitive and smooth I'm not even sure it's worth my time to customize reaper to try to fit my workflow. What do you find in reaper that you don't have in Studio one?


Quote:
Originally Posted by littlegtplr View Post
I've been using Studio One since 3 ish and use Reaper some time for collaboration. Both are powerful and stable (I'm on mac), where Studio One is more streamlined and has a certain workflow available, yet Reaper is more like you need to find your own way among the potentials and flexibility. Price wise, Reaper wins hands down, but I stick to Studio One as my main daw as I find myself more efficient and can focus more on the creativity activity than when I'm on Reaper. Studio One is often on sale for 50% off on Black Friday, might be a good time if you'd like a get a copy. Or Splice has a rent-to-own option for 24 month. Don't go for Presonus Sphere, unless you want the whole ecosystem.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #5
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fairchildren View Post
Thanks... yeah i have downloaded both... and so far Studio One seems so intuitive and smooth I'm not even sure it's worth my time to customize reaper to try to fit my workflow. What do you find in reaper that you don't have in Studio one?
None I can think of...but I haven't used Reaper as extensively as Studio One, so I might be biased
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #6
Gear Guru
 
Muser's Avatar
you can just poke around in Reaper over time and get it modified as you go along.
then you have something to lean back on, as and when you might need it.
I don't use studio one myself. I'd probably use Logic because I already know it well enough.
but at this point I'd be using Logic as a secondary tool, rather than a primary, in my case.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
Here for the gear
 

It's funny to find a thread with this name, as I've been looking into Reaper vs Studio One for the past couple of weeks. Sometimes I lean towards going with Reaper, sometimes towards Studio One. I used Cubase for many years, then switched to Pro Tools, then back to Cubase. I'm now looking to make either Reaper or Studio One my new DAW.

After playing around with Reaper in trial mode, playing around with Studio One 5 Prime, and watching a ton of youtube videos on both, I made an admittedly very biased list of pros and cons for both in relation to my use cases (songwriting/composing/sound design for games). Maybe this can benefit you.

* Feel free to correct me on any of the following:

Reaper

Things it has that Studio One doesn't:

- Spectral editing, sort of like Izotope RX or Spectralayers.
- Surround capability
- Region render matrix for fast exporting of large amounts of sound effects at a time.
- Waveforms visible for samples/loops in the media explorer.
- Very powerful and detailed routing system
- A ton of plugins in jsfx format
- Intense customizability
- Scripting support to add your own functionality
- Sub projects
- Video editing
- Whether you pay the $60 or $225 for the commercial version, that money goes a long way in terms of updates


Things I like about Reaper:

- It's fast to start up and exit
- Has a small install size and no dongle
- Seems very stable, and runs even on very low powered laptops
- Seems to be coded very well
- Lots of 3rd party extensions
- Multiple audio files simultaneously playing back on one track, useful for not having to create multiple tracks when doing non-crossfaded edits for a vocal comp. Studio One can kind of do this as well with "Play Overlaps".
- Many different themes available, although I'd probably stick with default
- Seems as if the few developers seem to be doing this out of passion and are less financially driven


Things I personally don't like about Reaper:

- While plugins are numerous and useful, their interfaces are very utilitarian and extremely uninspiring to look at
- Developers don't seem to be focusing on UX as much as other DAW developers do. For a paid product, I feel that this should be more of a priority.
- Scripting can be both a positive and a negative... It can add a lot of functionality not built-in, but sometimes to replicate certain functionality available in other DAWs, you have to use and be reliant on 3rd party scripts. Many are free, so you're dependent on the passion of those script creators to maintain/update/fix the scripts, as there is no financial incentive. If you can code, this is a moot point.
- Sometimes you just feel like you want to get work done, and not have to worry about customizing everything, but at least that option is available.
- To enter an exact numerical MIDI velocity without having to drag something, you have to open a separate pop-up window to do this.
- Doesn't seem to be an easy way to do ghost copies of audio items/events or grouping them together into parts like Cubase or Studio One, so that making edits to the audio automatically apply to all copies in other parts. There seem to be feature requests on the form for this though.


Studio One

Things it has that Reaper doesn't:

- Intuitive, ergonomic, low learning curve.
- Plugins have nicer UIs.
- More full-featured score editor
- Easier event fx applying and restoring
- More full featured sampler included (SampleOne XT), and drum plugin (Impact XT)
- Splice version control integration
- Show Page for live use.
- Built-in docked track and event inspector.
- A lot of included samples, loops, and instruments
- Built-in retrospective record, whereas Reaper requires a script


Things I like about Studio One:

- It's very well thought out. You can tell that UX and ease of use is a high priority.
- Feels creatively inspiring to use.
- No dongle, 5 computer activations.
- Also smaller install size, though not as compact as Reaper.
- Fat Channel
- Melodyne Essential included
- Nice looking Remote app interface for wirelessly controlling Studio One.
- Lots of starter content
- Hardware integration seems more straightforward than Reaper's, especially with Presonus' own products.
- Many of the key commands are similar to Cubase (because of original devs' background at Steinberg), which makes it easy for my muscle memory.
- Pricing for a crossgrade with discounts could come out to being cheaper than a commercial license for Reaper.


Things I personally don't like about Studio One:

- No surround capability, only stereo. There was a feature request with several hundred votes for this that they hid for some strange reason.
- Not enough post production features yet
- Has dual stereo panning as a plugin rather than built-in to the interface.
- While they are trying to implement the features their customer base needs/requests, some low-hanging fruit feature requests with a lot of votes have been left unaddressed
- Not as nice of a sample rate converter algorithm as other DAWs based on the comparisons at https://src.infinitewave.ca/
- I really dislike subscriptions. Thankfully they still have perpetual licenses, but I hope they never move to subscription only.
- Though it has macros, Studio One doesn't have as much customizability as Reaper, although sometimes I feel the streamlined approach may suit me better.


Conclusion:
I'm still not sure which to settle on as of right now. I do like the customizability and technicality of Reaper, but I also like the elegant workflow of Studio One. It will come down to whether I value being able to customize a DAW in detail to suit my workflow vs. whether I want to have to spend time doing that.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #8
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Korindian View Post
It's funny to find a thread with this name, as I've been looking into Reaper vs Studio One for the past couple of weeks. Sometimes I lean towards going with Reaper, sometimes towards Studio One. I used Cubase for many years, then switched to Pro Tools, then back to Cubase. I'm now looking to make either Reaper or Studio One my new DAW.
Excellent post and mirrors many of my own observations as I'm currently demoing both Studio One and Reaper as well.

I'm a long-term Cubase user and have been using Ableton for the "front half" of my writing, sampling, and sound design processes for the past couple of years, but am looking to replace Cubase for final tracking and mixing. The combination of Ableton and a more "traditional" DAW seems to be my ideal workflow. I still find mixing in Ableton as a less enjoyable experience, but love it for creating.

Cubase is powerful but a CPU hogging bloated experience for me with way too many functions that I will likely never use. I need a leaner, more streamlined experience so I'm demoing both Reaper and Studio One.

The major differences for me so far have been the UI and the lack of Dual Panning (without a plugin) in Studio One. I've tried a bunch of themes for Reaper from the Stash, but prefer the native one. While I'm sure many people produce great work in Reaper, it feels like a development platform rather than something I want to produce music in. It seems difficult for me to resist the urge to constantly tweak the application rather than just having a good set of tools at my disposal to make music. Distraction is a blocker for me, and I can be my own worst enemy. I agree that the UX aspects are not great. The unwieldy lists of menus and having to dig into Actions lists and whatnot are not really what I want from my DAW.

Studio One certainly has a better UI and feels like a leaner version of Cubase, but it does seem to have the same glut of bundled FX and VSTi's that I'll likely never use as I have a suite of excellent third-party plugins that suit my needs. In my first test mix on S1, I also experienced an unnerving bug where the volume would randomly increase on some tracks when looping playback, and I hadn't done any volume automation at this point. It was a total WTF moment.

I'm still on the fence about both programs... I may also wait and see what Cubase 11 offers.

Can anyone build a lean, great sounding DAW with an excellent UI/UX for a reasonable price that doesn't have bundled plugins (or hardware) that I'll never use?
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #9
Gear Nut
 
fairchildren's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Korindian View Post
It's funny to find a thread with this name, as I've been looking into Reaper vs Studio One for the past couple of weeks. Sometimes I lean towards going with Reaper, sometimes towards Studio One. I used Cubase for many years, then switched to Pro Tools, then back to Cubase. I'm now looking to make either Reaper or Studio One my new DAW.

After playing around with Reaper in trial mode, playing around with Studio One 5 Prime, and watching a ton of youtube videos on both, I made an admittedly very biased list of pros and cons for both in relation to my use cases (songwriting/composing/sound design for games). Maybe this can benefit you.

* Feel free to correct me on any of the following:

Reaper

Things it has that Studio One doesn't:

- Spectral editing, sort of like Izotope RX or Spectralayers.
- Surround capability
- Region render matrix for fast exporting of large amounts of sound effects at a time.
- Waveforms visible for samples/loops in the media explorer.
- Very powerful and detailed routing system
- A ton of plugins in jsfx format
- Intense customizability
- Scripting support to add your own functionality
- Sub projects
- Video editing
- Whether you pay the $60 or $225 for the commercial version, that money goes a long way in terms of updates


Things I like about Reaper:

- It's fast to start up and exit
- Has a small install size and no dongle
- Seems very stable, and runs even on very low powered laptops
- Seems to be coded very well
- Lots of 3rd party extensions
- Multiple audio files simultaneously playing back on one track, useful for not having to create multiple tracks when doing non-crossfaded edits for a vocal comp. Studio One can kind of do this as well with "Play Overlaps".
- Many different themes available, although I'd probably stick with default
- Seems as if the few developers seem to be doing this out of passion and are less financially driven


Things I personally don't like about Reaper:

- While plugins are numerous and useful, their interfaces are very utilitarian and extremely uninspiring to look at
- Developers don't seem to be focusing on UX as much as other DAW developers do. For a paid product, I feel that this should be more of a priority.
- Scripting can be both a positive and a negative... It can add a lot of functionality not built-in, but sometimes to replicate certain functionality available in other DAWs, you have to use and be reliant on 3rd party scripts. Many are free, so you're dependent on the passion of those script creators to maintain/update/fix the scripts, as there is no financial incentive. If you can code, this is a moot point.
- Sometimes you just feel like you want to get work done, and not have to worry about customizing everything, but at least that option is available.
- To enter an exact numerical MIDI velocity without having to drag something, you have to open a separate pop-up window to do this.


Studio One

Things it has that Reaper doesn't:

- Intuitive, ergonomic, low learning curve.
- Plugins have nicer UIs.
- More full-featured score editor
- Easier event fx applying and restoring
- More full featured sampler included (SampleOne XT), and drum plugin (Impact XT)
- Splice version control integration
- Show Page for live use.
- Built-in docked track and event inspector.
- A lot of included samples, loops, and instruments


Things I like about Studio One:

- It's very well thought out. You can tell that UX and ease of use is a high priority.
- Feels creatively inspiring to use.
- No dongle, 5 computer activations.
- Also smaller install size, though not as compact as Reaper.
- Fat Channel
- Melodyne Essential included
- Nice looking Remote app interface for wirelessly controlling Studio One.
- Lots of starter content
- Hardware integration seems more straightforward than Reaper's, especially with Presonus' own products.
- Many of the key commands are similar to Cubase (because of original devs' background at Steinberg), which makes it easy for my muscle memory.
- Pricing for a crossgrade with discounts could come out to being cheaper than a commercial license for Reaper.


Things I personally don't like about Studio One:

- No surround capability, only stereo. There was a feature request with several hundred votes for this that they hid for some strange reason.
- Not enough post production features yet
- Has dual stereo panning as a plugin rather than built-in to the interface.
- While they are trying to implement the features their customer base needs/requests, some low-hanging fruit feature requests with a lot of votes have been left unaddressed
- Not as nice of a sample rate converter algorithm as other DAWs based on the comparisons at https://src.infinitewave.ca/
- I really dislike subscriptions. Thankfully they still have perpetual licenses, but I hope they never move to subscription only.
- Though it has macros, Studio One doesn't have as much customizability as Reaper, although sometimes I feel the streamlined approach may suit me better.


Conclusion:
I'm still not sure which to settle on as of right now. I do like the customizability and technicality of Reaper, but I also like the elegant workflow of Studio One. It will come down to whether I value being able to customize a DAW in detail to suit my workflow vs. whether I want to have to spend time doing that.


I've only shortly dabbled in reaper... but I'm not crazy excited to try to setup via customization. The navigation menus seem super slow. I love the endless features, but it just seems like it will always be slower than Studio One to do stuff. Being on studio one for a few days and the features keep surprising me. I think for now i'm going to commit to learning studio one. Seems to have almost everything one would need for audio recording and music.


What is the deal with the sample rate conversion? I'm surprised Ableton's is as clear as it is...Out of that list it looked like only Ableton and Cubase had the best SRC. Maybe i'm missing something?
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #10
Gear Guru
 
Muser's Avatar
the main problems I find in Reaper I encounter, and think many must encounter in differing ways (depending on changes they have tried to mouse modifiers) is the way the differing focused windows can cause expected keys on the keyboard to be unresponsive until the particular window is made to become in focus.

there’s also the way the certain core selection systems are configured to operate. you won’t easily be able to have the selection modes to say, drag over an area of an item, either independently on an items own internal area, or as a way to determine a general arrange selection area.

the arrange area seems generally configured to have to select outside any items in order to select a general selection area. e.g. selection in the grid area. so if you assumed you were able to do this and had a habit of doing so, in Reaper this may move an item instead of any of the above.

even though Reaper has a lot of behaviour modification options, these can be difficult to configure via a particular choice of preference settings and specific mouse modifier changes. but given it’s at least very simple for any user of any other DAW to just install Reaper, they can investigate those questions in an exact way, because the Reaper install is no different than the application proper.

but I would say that, a good habit to adopt out of the gate with Reaper, is to be able to mouse press on an empty area of the grid in order to always make sure everything becomes deselected. and to then go from that state, to selecting one single item. to me this seems the most simple modality habit to adopt.

because if you have two or more items selected and don’t know that you have, many things you do will affect those items, including deletion by hitting the keyboard delete key. and for a further example, to include the window focus into this behavioural basket, if you had a one track or more selected in the track area to the left of the arrange window, if you hit delete in that case, you would either get an alert about track deletion confirmation, or the tracks will just delete.

so one of the abilities that having Reaper se to deselect all the items in the arrange window, on a mouse press in an arrange windows empty area can provide, is threefold. one is that the track area on the left becomes unfocused, another is that the arrange window becomes focused, and the other is that all items become unselected. so then by just selecting the single item you are interested in altering or targeting, puts you in the best working position to proceed.

that’s my experience up to this point at least. but you may also want to try to make sure that your play stop record keys are set to (Global) in the actions list. that means that if say, your spacebar is used for a play / stop toggle behaviour, that this behaviour works in all cases, regardless of what window is focused. so that wether or not that particular window is focused, and wether or not the space bar does not do the same thing in that window focus mode, a (Global) status for the spacebar Action will still over-ride all those variables. just don’t set it to (Global + Text) because you won’t be able to use the spacebar to enter a period in any of Reapers Text windows. which is pretty much what my first paragraph is saying.

Last edited by Muser; 3 weeks ago at 07:11 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #11
Gear Nut
 
vsignet's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muser View Post
the main problems I find in Reaper I encounter, and think many must encounter in differing ways (depending on changes they have tried to mouse modifiers) is the way the differing focused windows can cause expected keys on the keyboard to be unresponsive until the particular window is made to become in focus.
I agree with all you said, this is one of the most annoying things. As with most things Reaper there is a workaround but it requires some work. I'll explain.

If you have a media item selected, then press Ctrl+T to insert a new track, then press backspace, the media item will be deleted, right? Because the "Insert track" doesn't change focus to the proper context.

What i did to work around stuff like this is to create custom actions for a lot of small things and add an extra Focus-modifier to it.

I have a custom "Insert track (focus)"-action which contains two elements:

SWS/BR: Focus Tracks
Track: Insert new track

This means that everytime i add a track with hotkey, the focus is on the actual tracks and whatever i do will concern the track-part of Reaper, not the arranger.

Similarly, i have "Select next track" and "Select previoust track mapped to Tab/Shift+tab. I create a new action called "Select next track (focus)" and add SWS/BR: Focus Track first, then Track: Go to next track". and so on.

For splitting at mouse cursor, i have a custom action that focuses arranger (SWS/BR: Focus Arrange) before splitting.

You get the picture. Use this trick everytime you notice an unexpected focus behavior. It is annoying and should never be like this, but it takes 10 minutes and it will be fixed forever. This, and the (Global) setting, has fixed most of my issues regarding hotkeys and focus in Reaper.


There is also a new fancy area select feature going through development right now (you can check it out by using development builds) which i think sort some of your other problems, though it is not quite finished yet.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #12
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Muser's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsignet View Post
There is also a new fancy area select feature going through development right now (you can check it out by using development builds) which i think sort some of your other problems, though it is not quite finished yet.
yeah I’ve seen people setting things up in a similar way too. although I haven’t yet decided on the way I might prefer to implement the use of the (under mouse cursor modes) the split item Action is a common favoured Action to use.

the possible process you can use tends to be limited by one main factor. that is that you can not use either a toolbar button or a radial dial entry to carry out anything which is an (under mouse cursor) operation. because if you did, you have inevitably moved your mouse position. so it can theoretically only be done via either a mouse modifier, an action or custom action or as an external trigger event, tied to the same kinds of key or modifier key operations.

when I decide what I think might be the best, I’ll take a look at what you decided to use as a workable choice, and update here with what I decided on. some accumulation of various approaches is always useful in any case.

I have yet to install a Version 6. I'll probably first try it as a portable install. I have a feeling some of my toolbar buttons may become dysfunctional, because of certain deprecations. so I need to not disturb my Version 5 in the process of
investigating Version 6.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Nut
 

Further to my previous post from last week, I've spent the last few days evaluating Reaper and am far more confident that it suits my workflow and the combo of Ableton for writing/sound design and Reaper for (additional) instrument/vocal tracking and mixing is the right move for me. I've gotten through the things that nagged me and picked up hotkeys and started personalising a UX for my needs. Reaper has largely been rock-solid so far and runs so bloody lean on CPU I may pass on upgrading the laptop as I've planned to previously.

In contrast, Studio One still seems buggy, at least for my workflow and 3rd party plugins. Random volume spikes in cycle mode and a couple of random crashes make me not want to invest in that platform. I also don't want to pay for plugins and instruments I'll likely never use. The vibe I get from Presonus is that they invest more in their marketing than developing a rock-solid platform. It's a nice UX, but my plan was to ditch Cubase and many things about S1 bug me in similar ways which is not suprising given the development history of that platform.

Anyway, Reaper has just about sold me on it and I suspect I'll be coughing up the ridiculously low $60 for a license in the very near future.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #14
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fairchildren's Avatar
 

Would you mind giving me a breakdown of what you did to get reaper working to suit your needs? I'm a big ableton guy as well. I haven't put Studio One through the paces yet, so that's unfortunate to hear that it doesn't handle CPU well. feck.



Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkyness View Post
Further to my previous post from last week, I've spent the last few days evaluating Reaper and am far more confident that it suits my workflow and the combo of Ableton for writing/sound design and Reaper for (additional) instrument/vocal tracking and mixing is the right move for me. I've gotten through the things that nagged me and picked up hotkeys and started personalising a UX for my needs. Reaper has largely been rock-solid so far and runs so bloody lean on CPU I may pass on upgrading the laptop as I've planned to previously.

In contrast, Studio One still seems buggy, at least for my workflow and 3rd party plugins. Random volume spikes in cycle mode and a couple of random crashes make me not want to invest in that platform. I also don't want to pay for plugins and instruments I'll likely never use. The vibe I get from Presonus is that they invest more in their marketing than developing a rock-solid platform. It's a nice UX, but my plan was to ditch Cubase and many things about S1 bug me in similar ways which is not suprising given the development history of that platform.

Anyway, Reaper has just about sold me on it and I suspect I'll be coughing up the ridiculously low $60 for a license in the very near future.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #15
Lives for gear
 
apartment dog's Avatar
 

After starting out in Cubase I used Reaper for years.
I switched to Studio One half a year ago and prefer that because;

I like editing in it; simple and clear
I get better results in Studio One.
Sometimes I had problems with duplicating events in Reaper that would not line up. Always had to check what happened. Now there might be some setting somewhere to prevent that but why would a DAW be like that?
Reaper feels like a hobby project for someone who loves to code and it's very good at that. I love to make music though.
I find the S1 GUI nicer to work with (I have used many Reaper GUIs). It gives my head more space to work on music. Reaper feels polluted to me. Maybe not the code itself but the overall feel of the workspace.
Warning; the next subject may give some people an attack of scientific excorcism, so please don't read if you feel like a scientific warrior;
pssst; I prefer the s***d in S1 (to anybody that wants to jump in and tell me that I will have to proof that; I accept that it's my ears; ok!!?)

What I do prefer in Reaper is the way it handles VST's, Studio One is not consistent with showing VST2 vs VST3 after installing both. That can be some extra work.
Lower CPU usage in Reaper of course but to me S1 does it well enough.
Lower price; S1 version 5 update only will bring me clip gain, the rest I don't care for. So I wait.
Dual panning plugin needed for dual stereo panning.
Better midi export. S1 exports all the rojects midi, not just one track.
Reaper can have very specific solutions (like with newly installed Waves plugins where you go to; C:\Users\User\AppData\Roaming\Reaper and change the 'reaper-vstplugins64' file and save it).
S1 FX auxes do not have sends so to give a delay track a bit of shared reverb you have to use a bus for the delay. Have not tried that yet.

Guess I will run into more pros and cons in time....
Happy with S1 but I keep Reaper installed.

To the OP; demo both and see what gives you the best workflow, results and fun.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #16
Gear Guru
 
Muser's Avatar
if you are moving or copying items in Reaper and the snapping icon is not activated,
then the item you copy or move, will end up only in an (approximate) grid destination.

the other two possibilities which impact where the item will end up are,

1: if you have the snapping icon activated
then dragging or moving an item with a hot key copy modifier,
will copy or move the item and snap to the defined grid settings criteria. <-- this is usually snapping to something like beats

2: but if you right click the snapping icon and enable ( snap relative to grid )
then any offset grid position in the original item you are copying or moving,
will be either preserving the original items start position or, preserve it and apply it to the copied item.

so if an item starts just before a bar and you move or copy it while snapping is ON, as well as, ( snap relative to grid )
then that items start position will remain relative to the Grid. e.g. the beginning won’t snap if you moved it somewhere else,
or even then moved it back. I usually try to keep relative to grid enabled in my snapping modes.

also, a useful bottom line trouble shooting routine for midi or midi devices:

in this video jump to around 47 mins in, to see the midi device setup section.
often, resetting midi devices from there will bring online any newly inserted midi device,
or reanimate any which have gone off line for some reason. or it will produce a reliable baseline state for Reapers midi condition.
e,g, if that doesn't fix some seemingly acting up midi behaviour, then it's probably something else, rather than a Reaper problem.

Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #17
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fairchildren View Post
Would you mind giving me a breakdown of what you did to get reaper working to suit your needs? I'm a big ableton guy as well. I haven't put Studio One through the paces yet, so that's unfortunate to hear that it doesn't handle CPU well. feck.
Sure. My needs are fairly simple as I either work with songwriters/bands as a producer/arranger, or produce my own stuff. I use Ableton's session view for for sketching ideas, sound design, and building the "framework" of the tracks via scenes and then prefer to switch to Cubase (now Reaper) for building the arrangement, tracking and mixing. My brain sees the two different DAW's as different phases of the creative process - Ableton is the "fun" creative and unstructured part, and the second daw is where I translate a bunch of random riffs, vocal melodies, noises and loops into a fully formed track.

In Cubase/Reaper, the process is pretty simple. I arrange parts from the demo into a song structure and replace scratch parts with proper takes. I'll either import stuff from Ableton as audio tracks or rewire stuff in and record it to an audio track. I also tend to commit anything other than time-based effects when tracking as I used to in the analog days. My mix process is pretty basic and I bounce stuff down to a manageable track size (16-20 audio tracks, 5-6 aux returns, etc). I tend to use the same EQ or a channel strip on most things so I have added hotkeys for basic things like commonly used plugins (e.g. "Alt-Q" for adding a Pro-Q, "Alt-C" for a channel strip, etc). I'm liking the routing as a "track" can be anything in Reaper. I never have to worry about defining something as a bus, fx, or folder track like in Cubase. Click-dragging to create a send is cool too. Automation is a little different, but I've navigated my way through it. I'm using the default theme and tweaked the colours slightly, but it's easy enough on the eye compared to some of the custom themes I've tried.

The only "downside" I've had so far in mixing in Reaper is a delay compensation issue with a Waves plugin on some drum tracks with a parallel compression bus that I solved by adding another instance to the parallel chain, but it's not a problem I had previously with Cubase (I did in Pro Tools back in the day). Not sure yet if that's specific to that plugin or a Reaper routing quirk, but it's not a deal-breaker.

Like most software evaluation, I have found that diving right into the workflow and learning as I go to be the best way of assessing something is for my needs. Hope this info helps.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #18
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Korindian View Post
- While plugins are numerous and useful, their interfaces are very utilitarian and extremely uninspiring to look at
Not all jsfx plugins are bland. The "best" imho free jsfx plugin (one I use all the time) is really worth checking out. It's called ReEQ (not to be confused with Reaeq, which comes with Reaper)
Check it out here: https://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=213501
Old 3 weeks ago
  #19
Gear Maniac
 
flipnaut's Avatar
I have S1 and Reaper

S1:
Good for making a song, using Midi - just to create something
Bad for mixing: Latency with external hardware is horror: Bad latency handling!
Bad Multithreading
Bad for Acustica Audio Plugins

Reaper:
Good for making a song
Good for external hardware and latency compensation
Extremly Powerful Code: Super CPU Multithreading use
Good and stable with Acustica Plugins

All in all i work in Reaper 70% all the time.
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #20
Gear Nut
 
fairchildren's Avatar
 

What type of computer are you running?

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipnaut View Post
S1:
Good for making a song, using Midi - just to create something
Bad for mixing: Latency with external hardware is horror: Bad latency handling!
Bad Multithreading
Bad for Acustica Audio Plugins

Reaper:
Good for making a song
Good for external hardware and latency compensation
Extremly Powerful Code: Super CPU Multithreading use
Good and stable with Acustica Plugins

All in all i work in Reaper 70% all the time.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #21
Gear Maniac
 
flipnaut's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by fairchildren View Post
What type of computer are you running?
no rocket science and an older system:

i7 4790k @4Ghz
16 GB Ram
Samsung SSD
Old 2 weeks ago
  #22
Gear Head
 
rugge78's Avatar
I use Reaper since 2010-2011, two or three projects per years.
This week I decided to buy the license. Now I'm a reaper official user
I tried Studio One, Cubase, but for my needs, all software are too clumsy, big and I don't have also the latest computer tecnology. I'm a Win7 user, 4gb ram ... so Reaper is taylored for my needs and it's far the best, complete and expandible program only for 60 bucks.
Old 5 days ago
  #23
Here for the gear
 

I've been using Reaper for three years. Before that, I was on Studio One for a year. Now Reaper as native.
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