The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
How much to charge for home studio recording. Bass Guitar
Old 28th March 2015
  #61
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
OK... let's put this in perspective here... I second Bill's comment. Gear means ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to anyone who IS NOT a sound engineer. Most people on these forums will try to tell you otherwise because most people on these forums are sound engineers AS WELL AS composers, songwriters, musicians, etc.

Most musicians, songwriters, artists, etc really don't care.

What they DO care about is how good your other projects have sounded. If you are graduating from school, then you pretty much have no experience.

You go to school to learn HOW TO LEARN. When you graduate you really know nothing. You have the building blocks to learn from your future experiences.

As your demo reel grows and gets better, your fee will go up. It doesn't matter how many bands you've recorded, or what expensive gear you have. The proof is "in the pudding". Period. How many of your recordings have received regional or national radio airplay? TV Licensing? 5000+ record sales? and so on. How many positive reviews of CDs you've recorded and mixed have there been? Are those reviews in national/international magazines like Rolling stone or your local town newspaper?

And so on... You have to BUILD your career. In doing so you have to start from the bottom and work UP. That might mean doing free recordings at first to at least get some decent projects under your belt.

Oh and by the way... most "clients" aren't going to be able to hear your excellent engineering skills SEPARATE from the skills of the artist. So if all you have is local garage bands who can't play in time or in tune and singer songwriters with no sense of rhythm and wouldn't know a key if it slapped them in the face... then people are going to hear THAT and associate you with it.

Building a career is ALWAYS an uphill battle. And it never ends... you are always only going to be as good as the last project you did and the artists you've worked with. As your clients grow in notoriety, so do you.

Also... another thing to consider with a home studio is who you are going to be bringing in?

The problem with a home studio is you live there. What if you get a call to do some gansta rap tracks or a band filled with alcoholics and drug addicts? Do you really want those guys hanging at your house and knowing where you live? I know a guy who had a home studio and took some sessions like that (doing a hiphop album for what turned out to be some gansters)... 6 months later his home was broken into... the only things stolen? All his recording gear (about $80,000 worth!). He could never pin it on the guys he recorded six months earlier.

I remember Dr Dre being asked one time how come he doesn't have a home studio... and he basically said, "Cuz I don't want these guys knowing where I live and being around my kids!"

So, that is something to think about when running a home studio. You are probably going to have to be more selective about your clients.

As for how much you can charge... it's based on how much your current clients can afford, and what your SKILLS (not tools) are worth to the people you are pitching your services to. That might be $5/hr. That might be $150/hr. It all really just depends. But just because you've heard of other sound engineers getting $50/hr or $80/hr or $150/hr, don't automatically assume you are worth the same.
Gangster is not synonymous with thief.
Old 28th March 2015
  #62
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
You have to fit your clientele to your gear /style. We don't have loops or even the software to produce them really. More of a :: walk in with your guitar/instrument & track your song. So the Roland VS works very well > 24 track tape / analog feel >> buttons & faders.

If our clients walked in & just saw a mouse with a laptop > they would feel maybe cheated. More like : I could do this at home ~ get my kid to record me in the bedroom . Three early Kurzweils run our "vst" ...racks of OTB > no real plugins used.


Maybe a few punchins for vocals/leads > certainly no drag this or minute editing on a WAV. It's~be totally rehearsed when you enter = saves the artist $
Old 28th March 2015
  #63
Lives for gear
 
Aaron Miller's Avatar
To the OP: What you can charge is a factor of (a) your credits, (b) results, (c) customer experience you offer, (d) location, (e) demand, (f) local competition, and (g) whether you want to do it full time to pay the bills and therefore have to take every client or whether you have a part time job and can be selective.

For me the location is poor, I don't have lots of credits, my reputation for a superior client experience is good, results are good, and I can be selective and not have to lower my hourly just to take any client. I work with clients I want to and charge $40/hour. It pays for my gear, not the bills. To pay the bills, I'd need a much better location and a bigger space. I'd have to take on projects I don't like for less than what I'd like to see hourly.
Old 30th March 2015
  #64
Lives for gear
 
noah330's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twenty Staxx View Post
Gangster is not synonymous with thief.
True, and Dr Dre is building a huge studio at the home he just purchased from Tom Brady.

Dr. Dre Building 10,000 Square Foot Home Studio
Old 30th March 2015
  #65
Sky
Lives for gear
 
Sky's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
heh, no....stuck in the studio in LA. Honestly, did it come off that bad? Didn't seem like it to me, but I've been fighting elsewhere today with a couple of guys about Copyrights and SOPA and am buttwhipped and down on patience....
I actually somewhat agree with your initial statement. Sure "gear means nothing" is pretty direct, but appropriate I think for someone who is starting out with minimal experience and budget. Forty dollars per hour for an album project can quickly add up to buying a decent home studio on par with Bobo09's setup. So why should someone give the money to Bobo09 versus building their own? If he brings amazing engineering and project management talent to the table and can keep his clients focused on creating great music, that would be justification hiring him.

Great talent can eventually build a great room, which is the best of all worlds.

Sky
Old 11th February 2018
  #66
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
OK... let's put this in perspective here... I second Bill's comment. Gear means ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to anyone who IS NOT a sound engineer. Most people on these forums will try to tell you otherwise because most people on these forums are sound engineers AS WELL AS composers, songwriters, musicians, etc.

Most musicians, songwriters, artists, etc really don't care.

What they DO care about is how good your other projects have sounded. If you are graduating from school, then you pretty much have no experience.

You go to school to learn HOW TO LEARN. When you graduate you really know nothing. You have the building blocks to learn from your future experiences.

As your demo reel grows and gets better, your fee will go up. It doesn't matter how many bands you've recorded, or what expensive gear you have. The proof is "in the pudding". Period. How many of your recordings have received regional or national radio airplay? TV Licensing? 5000+ record sales? and so on. How many positive reviews of CDs you've recorded and mixed have there been? Are those reviews in national/international magazines like Rolling stone or your local town newspaper?
mic drop...

And so on... You have to BUILD your career. In doing so you have to start from the bottom and work UP. That might mean doing free recordings at first to at least get some decent projects under your belt.

Oh and by the way... most "clients" aren't going to be able to hear your excellent engineering skills SEPARATE from the skills of the artist. So if all you have is local garage bands who can't play in time or in tune and singer songwriters with no sense of rhythm and wouldn't know a key if it slapped them in the face... then people are going to hear THAT and associate you with it.

Building a career is ALWAYS an uphill battle. And it never ends... you are always only going to be as good as the last project you did and the artists you've worked with. As your clients grow in notoriety, so do you.

Also... another thing to consider with a home studio is who you are going to be bringing in?

The problem with a home studio is you live there. What if you get a call to do some gansta rap tracks or a band filled with alcoholics and drug addicts? Do you really want those guys hanging at your house and knowing where you live? I know a guy who had a home studio and took some sessions like that (doing a hiphop album for what turned out to be some gansters)... 6 months later his home was broken into... the only things stolen? All his recording gear (about $80,000 worth!). He could never pin it on the guys he recorded six months earlier.

I remember Dr Dre being asked one time how come he doesn't have a home studio... and he basically said, "Cuz I don't want these guys knowing where I live and being around my kids!"

So, that is something to think about when running a home studio. You are probably going to have to be more selective about your clients.

As for how much you can charge... it's based on how much your current clients can afford, and what your SKILLS (not tools) are worth to the people you are pitching your services to. That might be $5/hr. That might be $150/hr. It all really just depends. But just because you've heard of other sound engineers getting $50/hr or $80/hr or $150/hr, don't automatically assume you are worth the same.
Mic drop...
Old 11th February 2018
  #67
Lives for gear
 
PdotDdot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobo09 View Post
I see that helps a little but it is quite a big jump. At my school as well as outside of school I've studied all different field from writing music, producing, tracking, mixing, engineering and mastering. So i'm not really interested with working with anyone else out of just a home studio. So with experience as well as gear and letting bands use my gear such as drums and guitars, would you say it would be fair to charge somewhere between 30-40 an hour to start until i buy more high end gear and maybe add an assistant?
I realize this is an old thread but there is a high end studio that I use on occasion and they charge $40 an hour with an engineer. Of you can get away with charging that much out of a home studio then good for you but being a home recording person myself I'd never pay that kind of money for a home studio.
Old 11th February 2018
  #68
Lives for gear
 

It is unlikely 20% of project studios have the efficient proficient skills to properly use their gear, be it humble or sophisticated. From a mythical short list of technically proficient project studios it is unlikely 1% would have the requisite production skills to be truly successful. There are very few people that have a sufficient background in musical training, specifically vocal harmony and theory, to provide appropriate advice to correct and shape vocals and their needed instrumental enhancements. The shortage of skilled production talent will continue it's downward spiral given the fact public schools began cost cutting their music training programs 30 years ago. The quality of a given producers discography dictates their potential price schedule: generally speaking people will pay for what they need and cannot provide otherwise!
Hugh
Old 3 weeks ago
  #69
Here for the gear
 
audioisfun's Avatar
SO, Bobo09, HOW MUCH did you start charging???
Old 1 week ago
  #70
Gear Addict
 

I think it's more along the lines of what's available in your area vs what they have to spend.
I've also been trying to get some local sessions Goin and there is a guy in my area that records bands free and a lot of the musicians seem to know about his place and despite the fact that he has limited experience recording they still go there
Really hard to compete with somebody that records for free.
Old 1 week ago
  #71
Lives for gear
 
ionian's Avatar
It really depends on the home. There's a home studio I use all the time except it's about as professional as a home studio can be. The guy charges about $75 an hour. The studio's on the bottom floor of his house.

For the $75 you get a live room built by the guy who did Avatar and is all wood. His desk is Phil Ramone's Neve 8068 that Billy Joel and Steely Dan's biggest albums were mixed on, so his console has provenance. He has 9 original Pultecs, two original blue stripe 1176s, two La3s, two La4s, Original metal knob neve 33609, RCA Ba6a, etc. He has a 16 track studer tape deck - and believe it or not, bands go there to track to tape as much as they do to pro tools. His mic locker is to die for. His place literally is the biggest goldmine if you're a gearslut.

The owner is also a phenomenal engineer who has tracked and mixed some gold records and radio hits out of his place, so when people walk in and see gold records for songs they know, that adds to the value.

The owner is also a great electrical engineer who has a workshop in another part of his house where he builds custom guitar amps and electronics for his clients, so he keeps every piece of gear in perfect working condition. That's invaluable. You're never walking into his place and hearing about how certain pieces of gear can't be used because they're broken.

That's what $75 an hour gets you in NY. Adjust accordingly.
Old 1 week ago
  #72
Lives for gear
 
RightOnRome's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ionian View Post
It really depends on the home. There's a home studio I use all the time except it's about as professional as a home studio can be. The guy charges about $75 an hour. The studio's on the bottom floor of his house.

For the $75 you get a live room built by the guy who did Avatar and is all wood. His desk is Phil Ramone's Neve 8068 that Billy Joel and Steely Dan's biggest albums were mixed on, so his console has provenance. He has 9 original Pultecs, two original blue stripe 1176s, two La3s, two La4s, Original metal knob neve 33609, RCA Ba6a, etc. He has a 16 track studer tape deck - and believe it or not, bands go there to track to tape as much as they do to pro tools. His mic locker is to die for. His place literally is the biggest goldmine if you're a gearslut.

The owner is also a phenomenal engineer who has tracked and mixed some gold records and radio hits out of his place, so when people walk in and see gold records for songs they know, that adds to the value.

The owner is also a great electrical engineer who has a workshop in another part of his house where he builds custom guitar amps and electronics for his clients, so he keeps every piece of gear in perfect working condition. That's invaluable. You're never walking into his place and hearing about how certain pieces of gear can't be used because they're broken.

That's what $75 an hour gets you in NY. Adjust accordingly.
well i am sure most of us hate our life now and feel quite inferior ..but none of this means your getting an amazing record .. it might be easier to get the tone your looking for, but thats it.. charging should be on a sliding scale like the Richter scale (earthquake) - as it clicks up, you get WAY more
Old 1 week ago
  #73
I found if I offer a Franklin most anyone will let me record them.
Old 1 week ago
  #74
Gear Maniac
 
Sniff's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by audioisfun View Post
SO, Bobo09, HOW MUCH did you start charging???
Bobo09 is a millionaire now and don't come here any more.

PS gear means nothing unless your selling Silver Bullets....















JOKING .....
Old 1 week ago
  #75
Lives for gear
 
ionian's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RightOnRome View Post
well i am sure most of us hate our life now and feel quite inferior
No reason to do feel inferior. I'd rather (and have done) just rent his place out to mix there and use the gear and console then try to compete. Plus included in the price, I get the engineer with his over 40 years experience and radio success. That's something you can't buy for your home studio.


Quote:
..but none of this means your getting an amazing record ..
No. All it means is that he provides a record that competes with any major label radio release out there. Whether it's amazing or not is kinda up to you, the artist providing the material.

Quote:
it might be easier to get the tone your looking for, but thats it.
Well, that kind of comes with experience. Name an artist or musician and the owner can pretty much name the chain or instruments that got the tone.

Quote:
charging should be on a sliding scale like the Richter scale (earthquake) - as it clicks up, you get WAY more
I thought that's what I posted, more or less. Just setting a benchmark, that for $75, that's what you get in NY. That's also why I said to adjust accordingly.
Old 1 week ago
  #76
Lives for gear
 
RightOnRome's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ionian View Post
No reason to do feel inferior. I'd rather (and have done) just rent his place out to mix there and use the gear and console then try to compete. Plus included in the price, I get the engineer with his over 40 years experience and radio success. That's something you can't buy for your home studio.




No. All it means is that he provides a record that competes with any major label radio release out there. Whether it's amazing or not is kinda up to you, the artist providing the material.



Well, that kind of comes with experience. Name an artist or musician and the owner can pretty much name the chain or instruments that got the tone.



I thought that's what I posted, more or less. Just setting a benchmark, that for $75, that's what you get in NY. That's also why I said to adjust accordingly.
awesome break down! I am working at $50...got great pre's, and converters, multiple rooms, high ceilings, great location...not at my home..and not open to the general public
Old 1 week ago
  #77
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by ionian View Post
It really depends on the home. There's a home studio I use all the time except it's about as professional as a home studio can be. The guy charges about $75 an hour. The studio's on the bottom floor of his house.

For the $75 you get a live room built by the guy who did Avatar and is all wood. His desk is Phil Ramone's Neve 8068 that Billy Joel and Steely Dan's biggest albums were mixed on, so his console has provenance. He has 9 original Pultecs, two original blue stripe 1176s, two La3s, two La4s, Original metal knob neve 33609, RCA Ba6a, etc. He has a 16 track studer tape deck - and believe it or not, bands go there to track to tape as much as they do to pro tools. His mic locker is to die for. His place literally is the biggest goldmine if you're a gearslut.

The owner is also a phenomenal engineer who has tracked and mixed some gold records and radio hits out of his place, so when people walk in and see gold records for songs they know, that adds to the value.

The owner is also a great electrical engineer who has a workshop in another part of his house where he builds custom guitar amps and electronics for his clients, so he keeps every piece of gear in perfect working condition. That's invaluable. You're never walking into his place and hearing about how certain pieces of gear can't be used because they're broken.

That's what $75 an hour gets you in NY. Adjust accordingly.
.

Now we get to the relative economics, as well as professional and sociological reality of the whole thing.

If this guy charges $75/hr, and he's booked as much as he WANTS to be booked, and this $75/hr can adequately or even luxuriously sustain him, AND HE'S HAPPY, THEN HE IS DEFINITELY WINNING!

These days, $75/hr in NYC for all that overhead seems perhaps unsustainable, but I have no idea what his situation is. If he's been in the space for a long time, or owns it outright and his taxes, insurance, utilities, maintenance, financing (perhaps), and all other overhead and carrying costs aren't killing him, he might be ok, or even reasonably successful!

Anyway, as you say, adjust accordingly. And this means for every possible factor of your financial, professional and spiritual reality.

Your friend's place sounds killer, btw!

Cheers!

.
Old 6 days ago
  #78
Lives for gear
 
latestflavor's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sqye View Post
.
These days, $75/hr in NYC for all that overhead seems perhaps unsustainable, but I have no idea what his situation is. If he's been in the space for a long time, or owns it outright and his taxes, insurance, utilities, maintenance, financing (perhaps), and all other overhead and carrying costs aren't killing him, he might be ok, or even reasonably successful!
.
Compare to a decent guitar tech in NYC @ $75/hr..... yeah.
Old 6 days ago
  #79
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by latestflavor View Post
Compare to a decent guitar tech in NYC @ $75/hr..... yeah.
.

Exactly.

.
Old 6 days ago
  #80
Gear Addict
 

Charge them a little more than u make flipping burgers at the krusty crab!
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
DavidKmusic / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music and Location Recording
13
Jim Easton / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music and Location Recording
9
briefcasemanx / Low End Theory
53

Forum Jump
Forum Jump