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Puremix - yes or no?
Old 28th March 2019
  #1
Deleted 5edf3fa
Guest
Puremix - yes or no?

I'm about to pull the trigger on their yearly subscription, their sale is ending tomorrow...

Is it worth it? What I'm looking for is being explained how to make the sound sound "right". I know the basics and I can get a decent mix that's not offending to the ears, and has everything in balance and all, just not quite there with the "perfect mix" or "whole sound".

I know the "right" means different thing to everyone. And all mixing engineers are trying to create their own sound, infuse personality and they all s%it on "sterile sound".

Well, I want to learn how to create that sterile sound. When I'm 10 years into it and have 200 platinum records behind me I'll worry about "my own" sound as a means of dealing with identity crisis. But until then I just want to be able to get the mix 100% right, e.g. get it sterile. As in, getting the rough mix in and just cleaning it up and balancing it so it sound the same, just "clean" and balanced, and tight and whole, and bringing out the best of each instrument without "infusing personality" into it.

I'm not particularly interested in someone loading up some wacky plugin and twisting knobs randomly until their guitar sounds like a patch from a freaking omnisphere which is what 99.9% of youtube mixing videos are about. I can make 100 of those video myself, thank you.

So, as a "basics" tool, is Puremix helpful in that regard? Is it in any way a substitute to a proper mixing engineering school?

$15/mo doesn't seem like much, but I really don't know what I'll be getting.
Old 28th March 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
I was a bit surprised at the amount of content... I thought there would be more, honestly.

What I’ve watched so far has been top notch, however.
Old 28th March 2019
  #3
Deleted 5edf3fa
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
I was a bit surprised at the amount of content... I thought there would be more, honestly.

What I’ve watched so far has been top notch, however.
Are you a subscriber? I skimmed through their list of videos, can't tell if that's too much or too little. I've watched a few free videos cant draw conclusions. I'm mostly drawn to big names behind them. While separate point specific tutorials should be no doubt useful its using different techniques in combination and applying them to troubleshoot complex mixing problems that is I need to learn about.

Most youtube videos teach you how to turn a steering wheel or press on the brakes but none reaply teach you how to drive well so to say.

Also I don't know if 3mo is enough for a person with a rarher limited amount of free time, or if I should ho for the whole year.

Also Im mostly interested with pop-style synth mixing (Nexus like), not guitars and acoustic drums although I value that too. Seems like most producers they have are famous for working with rock/alternative music and not many pop...

Im already watching Produce like a Pro channel and heir live mixing sessions which I love so O wonder if Puremix is more of the same just not free or is it really going to elevate my skills
Old 28th March 2019
  #4
Lives for gear
 
AudioGaff's Avatar
Nope. Not worth it at least to me. Too few videos of real value and they dribble them out less than once a month. The real good videos maybe 2-3 a year at best. The info in the articles they push as it is cheap content for them, can be had for FREE with the same info all over the web. Only real value is if your a lazy newbie wank-er that is looking for basic content in once place. You would be much better off finding and paying for a qualified personal mentor even if it would likely cost you more.
Old 28th March 2019
  #5
Gear Nut
 
up and at them's Avatar
 

Had the subscription for a year and didn't renew. Same comments as everyone above, there are a few videos that are really good, but most of the content is just "meh" and new videos are few and far between. It's probably worth it to just purchase the individual videos that are of more value since you can access them at any time.
Old 28th March 2019
  #6
Gear Addict
 

Don't do it for a year. I've been there and yes there are some good videos but it takes about a month too watch the good ones a couple of times.
very few new videos or activities
Old 29th March 2019
  #7
Gear Nut
 

I might feel differently after a while, but I just joined and I'm very happy with it so far. Yes you can learn all kinds of recording tips scouring the web, but as far as I know, this is the only place I've found where you can look over the shoulder of Shepps, CLA, Al Schmitt, etc for a solid two hours. If I'm mistaken, please point me to where I can so I can save the money.
Old 30th March 2019
  #8
Deleted 5edf3fa
Guest
Yeah, I decided not to buy it after all. I feel like I improved a lot in the past few weeks just by watching PLAP streams alone and mixing my own songs.

Initial threads about Puremix from 5-6 years ago were all high praise but I guess a lot changed since then.

I would give them a try if they had just one month for like $20. Just to see all those grandmasters at work.

But since it looks like they want a minimum of $80 out of your pocket... I just had bad feelings about it.
Old 30th March 2019
  #9
If you compare it to a gear purchase, it's a good value. I come from the time where you had to get take out, empty the trash, sweep, make coffee, etc. just get a few tidbits of information. It almost feels like cheating. After a year so, I do find I use it less and less though.
Old 28th June 2019
  #10
Gear Maniac
It is nothing but a milking site. You can get what they teach all over the internet. It is just a concept of what they teach can be found everywhere. And mixing is all about practice. Just practice on your own every single day and you will be a Pro. Even their final mix, which they say is a finished product in every tutorial, is mediocre. Three or 4 videos worth watching others are trash. You can get a lot from youtube. They are just selling Engineers names. You will not learn a thing. Produce like a Pro can teach you a lot more on free live video than purmix subscription per year. If the end result sounds like trash, what is the point of subscribing? Are they teaching people how to sound trash? That is what I always ask myself.
Old 28th June 2019
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Synth Buddha's Avatar
Had a membership. Don't have one anymore, and no plans to renew in the future. Was left fairly unimpressed.
Old 28th June 2019
  #12
Gear Nut
 

Few really good things but too much I'm not interested in. Didn't get enough out of it so was only on it for a few months.
Old 28th June 2019
  #13
MWTM looks interesting, but it seems spendy.
Old 29th June 2019
  #14
Gear Nut
 

I was pro pure-mix earlier. Less so now.

I think there's value there, but I'm finding that it leans heavily towards a style of mixing that frankly isn't terribly interesting to me. If you're looking for ITB mixing tips with drum replacement samples, a half dozen plugins per channel and several busses of parallel compression, then check it out. For me it just ends up WAY too far from the original performance. Then again I'm old, so take that for what it's worth..
Old 29th June 2019
  #15
Gear Maniac
 
Studio Saturn's Avatar
If I start all over again, I won't spend a dime on Puremix. If I were you, I would be more concerned about my speaker, my interface, my room. Like stated above, you can get what they teach from the internet and youtube. I'm telling you, Youtube has a lot more resources than Puremix with a lot more professional sounding mix. I went to the extent of making a decision not to buy anything from a company who is sponsoring Puremix. If one is contributing to what they offer, how do I trust that company about quality?

Let me tell you something. I click on their video and see the final mix and if it sounds good I will watch the whole video if not I won't bother watching. As a result of that, these days the number of videos that I watch has become even zero. I feel embarrassed even for those so called engineers, if they sit to teach please they have to teach. Don't go around the bush and deliver a rough mix and with a lot of confidence they call it a day and smile. Are you kidding me? are they smiling at us on people who spend time and money watching that underwhelming video or smiling because they are proud of their results?

Their videos are bombarded with plugins which have paid more for sposor ships than musicality. Every engineer comes to the tutorial chair to advertise his own plugin. Anyway, I will post my page from purmix for you to figure out how much I don't care to watch their videos these days as I don't learn a tiny bit from them. Even those which are highlighted watched are the ones I clicked to see what the end result is.

My advice for you is to save your money for more concerning things on music like your Room, Speaker, Interface, Cans and you will thank me in the future.

Look how many videos that I haven't bothered to click. Even for those I did, it is to see the final mix.
Attached Thumbnails
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Old 29th June 2019
  #16
Gear Nut
 

The problem I see with PureMix is the same as with most others like that. Nobody really wants to reveal any "secrets", so all you get is a bit of tweaking of material that sounds quite good anyway. So if you would tweak the stuff differently it would sound different, but good nonetheless.

It's all a bit like a user manual that tells you that a piece of gear can do something, but doesn't tell you how.

There are some tutorials that supposed to teach you how to listen, but there's nothing that takes it from there to good examples. No real life stuff, at least not in a way that one could really profit from for own work.

Worst of all is CLA, sits there, mixes stuff, explains nothing and throws arrogant comments around, like "why do I use the xyz-compressor? Because I can afford it and you can't". What a ridiculous little git to book for tutorials.

Every mix you make yourself, regardless how bad, as long as you learn from your mistakes it's worth more than all those videos together.

DM
Old 29th June 2019
  #17
Lives for gear
 
Quetz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by digimatt
The problem I see with PureMix is the same as with most others like that. Nobody really wants to reveal any "secrets", so all you get is a bit of tweaking of material that sounds quite good anyway. So if you would tweak the stuff differently it would sound different, but good nonetheless.
It's identifying the differences that reveals the core information, and applying that to your material.

And there are no secrets, unless using your ears is a secret (and maybe it is).
it's esoteric in that there are lots of open secrets which for some reason newcomers routinely overlook or undervalue.
These can feel like shallow, unhelpful generalities but there's sometimes deep truths lurking in there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digimatt
it's all a bit like a user manual that tells you that a piece of gear can do something, but doesn't tell you how.
Puremix's contributors often offer philosophical approaches and guidance which probably feels to some people like they're under-delivering, because it's natural when you're learning to believe there's a magic bullet setting, technique or piece of gear that overnight is going to reduce our level of suck.

There are some things you can do to quickly improve to a point but I expect many Puremix subscribers like myself are wallowing in the mid-tier of suck and therefore are looking for impossible ways to bridge a gap with settings that can only be bridged with time and hours spent mixing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digimatt
There are some tutorials that supposed to teach you how to listen, but there's nothing that takes it from there to good examples. No real life stuff, at least not in a way that one could really profit from for own work.
The examples can be very explicit, and Fab Dupont is really good for this, like showing the effects and consequences of mixbus compression, the reverb and other listening tests, the recording and mix session of the Will Knox band etc.
This is all very useful information, generously given.

Likewise you could listen to Andrew Scheps or Ryan Hewitt for half an hour without them mentioning a single piece of gear or setting and still come away with useful info that you can apply straight away.
Mixing is more about ideology than equipment.
The equipment is there to serve the ideology.

Also, a lot of these techniques and processes and differences are surprisingly subtle.
You receive information about general directions to go in and have some points of reference right, but it's still you that has to do the work when it comes to making things second nature and understanding them empirically and not just intellectually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digimatt
Worst of all is CLA, sits there, mixes stuff, explains nothing and throws arrogant comments around, like "why do I use the xyz-compressor? Because I can afford it and you can't". What a ridiculous little git to book for tutorials.
Some of the contributors are more watchable than others, that's for sure.
There were a couple I couldn't get through purely based on personality.
Painfully superficial but hey, I'm human.

I would definitely stop short of calling someone with a serious track record ridiculous though.
He comes across as quite brusque sometimes but I think that's because he's uncomfortable with trying to transfer his process logically, his style is more emotion than logic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digimatt
every mix you make yourself, regardless how bad, as long as you learn from your mistakes it's worth more than all those videos together.
Yeah but it's the classic case of knowing which mistakes to make that saves time.
Traditionally you'd be an apprentice and have a mentor/shepherd that planned where and when you'd make your mistakes, keeping you away from all the stuff that didn't matter.

That's where providers like Puremix come in. They prevent you from venturing too far into the bizarre.
Old 29th June 2019
  #18
Lives for gear
 
Quetz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Saturn
I would be more concerned about my speaker, my interface, my room
I'm more concerned about my knowledge and perspective than those, but everything plays its part.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Saturn
you can get what they teach from the internet and youtube. I'm telling you, Youtube has a lot more resources than Puremix
You're telling us that the entire rest of the internet has more resources than their one website.
I don't fancy exploring the entire internet, constantly dubious about authenticity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Saturn
I went to the extent of making a decision not to buy anything from a company who is sponsoring Puremix. If one is contributing to what they offer, how do I trust that company about quality?
There's nothing low quality about Puremix, but it might not suit everybody's learning style.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Saturn
their videos are bombarded with plugins which have paid more for sposor ships than musicality.
They're quite heavy on UAD sometimes where it's obviously a sponsorship thing but I wouldn't call uad plugs 'unmusical'.

It's not about the plugins anyway, it's about the character of the change in sound, and you can achieve different variations of that with different plugs/hardware.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Saturn
Every engineer comes to the tutorial chair to advertise his own plugin.
I'm not in the market for a vacuum cleaner but I don't get offended when I see one advertised.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio Saturn
Look how many videos that I haven't bothered to click.
That's like a guy just told us he hates peanut butter showing us zero supermarket receipts for peanut butter?
Old 11th February 2020
  #19
Company Rep
 
puremix.net's Avatar
 

pureMix' strategy is definitely to feature the one of the best mentors in the industry for you guys to watch and learn from them as much as you can. Also, we make a point of making more topic focused how to videos on eq, compression, etc... as well as how to listen series in order to sharpen your ears.
Check out our blog/Instagram for free excerpts and additional content: https://www.puremix.net/blog.html
Old 11th February 2020
  #20
Lives for gear
 
AudioGaff's Avatar
pureMix strategy is to take your money and provide the most minimum of low value content that they can get a way with. Tried it or a year. VERY LITTLE value, very little content offered over that year. No real value if you already have basic skills. The net is littered with the same kind of info for free, you just need to put in some effort to search it out.

BIG-O NO for me! Would not recommend.
Old 12th February 2020
  #21
Lives for gear
 
e-are's Avatar
I guess I'm in the minority.
I renew around Christmas time and get a great value. There are several tutorials I really dig. Maybe watch them several times and may gain a technique or two but every little bit helps. I would love to see more hip hop /R&B / electronic genres added this year. I ignored the rock videos because I don't mix or create rock. Big mistake!! Vance Powell, Joel Hamilton..some great tutorials that I've gained several tips from. If you haven't had the opportunity to sit with many good or pro engineers, I think it's pretty cool and at the price of a plugin or two that I'll probably forget about eventually. I sprung $300 for MWTM and at the end of the day, not as great value as Puremix, IMHO. Another bonus is getting the multitrack files to mix the same songs.
Old 12th February 2020
  #22
Company Rep
 
puremix.net's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by e-are View Post
I guess I'm in the minority.
I renew around Christmas time and get a great value. There are several tutorials I really dig. Maybe watch them several times and may gain a technique or two but every little bit helps. I would love to see more hip hop /R&B / electronic genres added this year. I ignored the rock videos because I don't mix or create rock. Big mistake!! Vance Powell, Joel Hamilton..some great tutorials that I've gained several tips from. If you haven't had the opportunity to sit with many good or pro engineers, I think it's pretty cool and at the price of a plugin or two that I'll probably forget about eventually. I sprung $300 for MWTM and at the end of the day, not as great value as Puremix, IMHO. Another bonus is getting the multitrack files to mix the same songs.
Thank you! We are glad to hear that our content and hard work on providing the best videos help you improve your Mixing game dude! We thrive to get more hip hop/electronic soon, it's just the way it works in the industry it takes times, keep your eyes peeled for next big Start to Finish series and Inside the Mix comin' up
Old 4 weeks ago
  #23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quetz View Post
It's identifying the differences that reveals the core information, and applying that to your material.

And there are no secrets, unless using your ears is a secret (and maybe it is).
it's esoteric in that there are lots of open secrets which for some reason newcomers routinely overlook or undervalue.
These can feel like shallow, unhelpful generalities but there's sometimes deep truths lurking in there.



Puremix's contributors often offer philosophical approaches and guidance which probably feels to some people like they're under-delivering, because it's natural when you're learning to believe there's a magic bullet setting, technique or piece of gear that overnight is going to reduce our level of suck.

There are some things you can do to quickly improve to a point but I expect many Puremix subscribers like myself are wallowing in the mid-tier of suck and therefore are looking for impossible ways to bridge a gap with settings that can only be bridged with time and hours spent mixing.



The examples can be very explicit, and Fab Dupont is really good for this, like showing the effects and consequences of mixbus compression, the reverb and other listening tests, the recording and mix session of the Will Knox band etc.
This is all very useful information, generously given.

Likewise you could listen to Andrew Scheps or Ryan Hewitt for half an hour without them mentioning a single piece of gear or setting and still come away with useful info that you can apply straight away.
Mixing is more about ideology than equipment.
The equipment is there to serve the ideology.

Also, a lot of these techniques and processes and differences are surprisingly subtle.
You receive information about general directions to go in and have some points of reference right, but it's still you that has to do the work when it comes to making things second nature and understanding them empirically and not just intellectually.



Some of the contributors are more watchable than others, that's for sure.
There were a couple I couldn't get through purely based on personality.
Painfully superficial but hey, I'm human.

I would definitely stop short of calling someone with a serious track record ridiculous though.
He comes across as quite brusque sometimes but I think that's because he's uncomfortable with trying to transfer his process logically, his style is more emotion than logic.



Yeah but it's the classic case of knowing which mistakes to make that saves time.
Traditionally you'd be an apprentice and have a mentor/shepherd that planned where and when you'd make your mistakes, keeping you away from all the stuff that didn't matter.

That's where providers like Puremix come in. They prevent you from venturing too far into the bizarre.
This post should be a sticky-

I had Mix With the Masters for a year- I'm now in my second stint with Pure Mix. I've also used Pro Audio Files and a bunch of others.

I hope to avoid sounding like father time- but I hope my experience can help someone.

I paid the money for MWTM because it seemed like a window into people like Andy Wallace's thinking and general process. Which for someone such as me, can be entertaining and I may get one or two useful things which help me in my world of music creating and production.

I've either been in the room as a client, or my client's have been for some of the names on these sites- so I thought it was cool and worth the money to see what they do in light of the changing tech, etc..

I found MWTM to be more about entertainment- whereas Pure Mix helps me with practical things that actually directly help me get better results in my little project studio.

My favorite mentor is Fab Dupont- he is engaging and the material he presents on for example, the how to listen series, has totally changed the game for me.
Once you get in there and really do the stuff he says to do, you (at least I) begin to realize that I have a lot to learn about fundamental stuff like metering inside the DAW, and understanding that EQ can act like compression and vise-versa- things that I may have not really connected the dots about before.

Dupont does something I wish more tutors would do, and that is encourage people to hear for themselves and guide them at the same time. He is so engaging as a presenter as well. Just today I watched the Pultec how to listen series where he outline the history of the EQ's all the way to how they can and typically are used these days. Listening to things in context, the way he presents is freaking priceless to me.

I've probably functionally learned more in the past two weeks with Pure Mix than several years of trial and error.

I agree with the poster that said there is no magic bullet- the magic is understanding fundamentals that affect the final product. Unfortunately many people have not had the fortune to learn fundamentals and so there has to be a piecemeal approach.

That's why I decided to go back to the basics like- how do I know when I am legitimately over compressing something? Well it sounds crappy, ok, but what does that actually mean?

The Pure Mix CLA video where he mixes ITB- is freaking incredible- there are all sorts of things I took from that video- installing a 2 buss aux before the master fader and driving that way is a great tip of his, among many others.

If you step out to the 30,000 foot view- listen to the things mixers say when they shut the music off for a second- Greg Wells gives some incredible nuggets while mixing at Sunset Sound for Pure Mix- There is gold all over the place.

But like I said- I know I can trust what's on Puremix and the website's players are also very reliable- and I can search by filters for things like gain staging and Pro Tools ,etc...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #24
Company Rep
 
puremix.net's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by babydaddymusic View Post
This post should be a sticky-

I had Mix With the Masters for a year- I'm now in my second stint with Pure Mix. I've also used Pro Audio Files and a bunch of others.

I hope to avoid sounding like father time- but I hope my experience can help someone.

I paid the money for MWTM because it seemed like a window into people like Andy Wallace's thinking and general process. Which for someone such as me, can be entertaining and I may get one or two useful things which help me in my world of music creating and production.

I've either been in the room as a client, or my client's have been for some of the names on these sites- so I thought it was cool and worth the money to see what they do in light of the changing tech, etc..

I found MWTM to be more about entertainment- whereas Pure Mix helps me with practical things that actually directly help me get better results in my little project studio.

My favorite mentor is Fab Dupont- he is engaging and the material he presents on for example, the how to listen series, has totally changed the game for me.
Once you get in there and really do the stuff he says to do, you (at least I) begin to realize that I have a lot to learn about fundamental stuff like metering inside the DAW, and understanding that EQ can act like compression and vise-versa- things that I may have not really connected the dots about before.

Dupont does something I wish more tutors would do, and that is encourage people to hear for themselves and guide them at the same time. He is so engaging as a presenter as well. Just today I watched the Pultec how to listen series where he outline the history of the EQ's all the way to how they can and typically are used these days. Listening to things in context, the way he presents is freaking priceless to me.

I've probably functionally learned more in the past two weeks with Pure Mix than several years of trial and error.

I agree with the poster that said there is no magic bullet- the magic is understanding fundamentals that affect the final product. Unfortunately many people have not had the fortune to learn fundamentals and so there has to be a piecemeal approach.

That's why I decided to go back to the basics like- how do I know when I am legitimately over compressing something? Well it sounds crappy, ok, but what does that actually mean?

The Pure Mix CLA video where he mixes ITB- is freaking incredible- there are all sorts of things I took from that video- installing a 2 buss aux before the master fader and driving that way is a great tip of his, among many others.

If you step out to the 30,000 foot view- listen to the things mixers say when they shut the music off for a second- Greg Wells gives some incredible nuggets while mixing at Sunset Sound for Pure Mix- There is gold all over the place.

But like I said- I know I can trust what's on Puremix and the website's players are also very reliable- and I can search by filters for things like gain staging and Pro Tools ,etc...
We really appreciate your time feeding back your experience with us man! Fab is working hard to ''fine tune'' the video and the learning experience (no pun intended ha) , we are looking forward to adding new features on the puremix platform very soon!
If you have not already, you should join our group on FB ''puremixer'' a great community where people talk tips, special highlights from us and you can directly ask Fab ANYTHING!
Best wishes
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