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What are some of the best cities to make money playing live music? Condenser Microphones
Old 26th April 2018
  #1
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What are some of the best cities to make money playing live music?

I'm not sure whether this would be considered off-topic, but I'm wondering what you all might think.

On the surface, this strikes me as a hard question to answer. A lot of the cities with the most opportunities to play live also have a massive amount of competition and don't seem to necesarilly be the best places to make money performing ("pay to play", anyone?). Perhaps the answer is a bit counter-intuitive...

If someone simply wants to make money playing live, and is open to all different types of gigs, then what are some of the best cities to do that? What are some of the general rules governing an artist's ability to get solid paying live gigs?
Old 26th April 2018
  #2
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some place with nice weather often.

Buffalo NY in the summer is absolutely amazing. Everywhere. All over. Relentlessly. Tons of great work from May until late September.

Winter? Find an in house gig if you can.
Old 26th April 2018
  #3
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I’m going to say that small towns are better than big cities here. Generally speaking, you’re more likely to be appreciated in a place that has very little going on. If it’s a smaller place that’s growing, there’s more of a chance that the community will invest in you if you fit in with their culture.
Old 27th April 2018
  #4
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Musicians always have a hard time competing with entertainers no matter where you are.
Old 27th April 2018
  #5
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Where on the planet are you?
Old 27th April 2018
  #6
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New York City, London, Berlin, Yaoundé (Cameroon), New Orleans, Paris, Kingston (Jamaica), São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)...these are some of the main cities I've visited with a a very robust, international, live music scene. These cities are not the only places or necessarily the "best" places, that might depend on where you are and ht you do.
Old 28th April 2018
  #7
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Thanks for your replies! To some of the questions, I live in the U.S., and I do primarilly rock/pop (e.g., singer-songwriter, with or without a backing band).
Old 28th April 2018
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
New York City, London, Berlin, Yaoundé (Cameroon), New Orleans, Paris, Kingston (Jamaica), São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)...these are some of the main cities I've visited with a a very robust, international, live music scene. These cities are not the only places or necessarily the "best" places, that might depend on where you are and ht you do.
I'd assumed that NYC is largely "pay to play" until you've built a following, much like L.A. Also, I'd assumed most of the paying gigs in New Orleans were jazz-related.

Please correct me.
Old 28th April 2018
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nerry2 View Post
I'd assumed that NYC is largely "pay to play" until you've built a following, much like L.A. Also, I'd assumed most of the paying gigs in New Orleans were jazz-related.

Please correct me.
NYC presents the most gigging opportunities in the entire USA as far as I know...from cover bands playing in bars to buskers playing in the subway or on the street and everything in between. Yes, most of the gigs in New Orleans are jazz and blues but other genres are represented too.
Old 3rd May 2018
  #10
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Pay to play happens everywhere and is reasonable to some extent.

If you're not bringing a decent sized paying/drinking crowd what's the point of a venue paying you? I've seen bands play to empty rooms and then cry about not getting free beer when they're the only actual paying customers in the room. They just got a stage for a night, that's all.

If a restaurant has a good paying crowd and they want to provide live entertainment for the people who are already paying to go there, you should be paid for that. That is providing a service.

If a bar advertises that you are playing there and that's the reason people should come, there's no point in them paying their staff, paying to turn on the lights and AC for the night, if no one shows up to buy drinks and tip. They need some sort of guarantee that they will cover their operating costs. If you fill the place and you end up paying out of pocket for some reason, that's wrong. Either take the door money or take a cut of the bar, either way both venue and artist profit if they've both done their jobs. And if you charge $20 at the door and it keeps people away, you've not done a good job.

I used to work at a club and we'd always ask "What is your draw?". A live artist, especially in their own local area, should really know how many people are going to show up. If you play out once a month and 50 people come to see you regularly, that's great. You can get on a bill with other similar draws and have a great night, provided the audience sticks around for all of the acts.

If 10-20 people come, that's fine to, just be honest about it You can grow your audience by opening for similar sounding acts. If it's just your significant other, you've got some work to do but it's a start! We used to have people tell us they could "fill the place" and we could never trust that, compared to someone who would ask our capacity and give us realistic numbers, even vs. people who would go elsewhere if they felt our place was too small. It's business.

That's why I suggest being in a place where you have access to smaller towns. I come from a small town, 2 hour drive to the nearest big city, 2 real venues and a couple of smaller cafe type places. When there's any sort of show going on, they sell out. EVERYONE comes because that is all there is to do there.
Old 3rd May 2018
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
That's why I suggest being in a place where you have access to smaller towns. I come from a small town, 2 hour drive to the nearest big city, 2 real venues and a couple of smaller cafe type places. When there's any sort of show going on, they sell out. EVERYONE comes because that is all there is to do there.
So Aim low and pray you don't have any competition...if you're just a hobbyist, weekend warrior this might be okay for you, but if you're serious and want to up your game then do the opposite.

Hiding away in some two bar town playing once a month to the same 20 people is going to get stale really fast. You want people with a lot of choices taking the subway across town to come see and hear you play...if you want to be a serious professional of course.
Old 3rd May 2018
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
So Aim low and pray you don't have any competition...if you're just a hobbyist, weekend warrior this might be okay for you, but if you're serious and want to up your game then do the opposite.

Hiding away in some two bar town playing once a month to the same 20 people is going to get stale really fast. You want people with a lot of choices taking the subway across town to come see and hear you play...if you want to be a serious professional of course.

Played lots in a major city, got paid $20-100 a night. Friend of mine plays small town shows for $500+ a night.

Building a fan base is the same in either case. If there's 100 people in the room, that's your exposure for the night either way. As for aiming low and praying, you can make a decision as to when you're actually ready to compete in a major market but still build your finances while you build your audience.

I'm not saying your wrong, just speaking from real world experience as I've lived both lives. Use a viable environment to make money while you build. The OP was regarding the best way to make money.

As for building, how do you get people to subway across town to see you? Playing once a month to the same 20 people gets stale when you're in a big city too!
Old 3rd May 2018
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
Played lots in a major city, got paid $20-100 a night. Friend of mine plays small town shows for $500+ a night.

Building a fan base is the same in either case. If there's 100 people in the room, that's your exposure for the night either way. As for aiming low and praying, you can make a decision as to when you're actually ready to compete in a major market but still build your finances while you build your audience.

I'm not saying your wrong, just speaking from real world experience as I've lived both lives. Use a viable environment to make money while you build. The OP was regarding the best way to make money.

As for building, how do you get people to subway across town to see you? Playing once a month to the same 20 people gets stale when you're in a big city too!
I'm sitting here wondering why all those musicians and bands in NYC aren't flooding into small upstate towns, or in New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. How many nights per week/month was your friend who earned $500+ per night, was working...and how much did/could you earn while working in "a major city"?

You don't build a fan base the same in NYC like you do in a two bar town...
Old 3rd May 2018
  #14
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My hometown, Springfield, Illinois, has more live music per capita than anywhere I've ever been. And they've never heard of pay to play. Which makes sense, because it's not where you go to get "discovered."

May music arrives
Old 3rd May 2018
  #15
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Maybe they're doing fine where they are? Maybe they're trying to "make it" in the industry in a different way, ie; getting known? Maybe the haven't had the same experience or thought about trying it? Maybe they tried it and had a different experience depending on their market? Can't speak for them obviously.

The person I mentioned toured internationally with a synth pop band making $50 a night for years. They got signed to a major, sold out shows in Europe, kept on making that $50. Maybe 1 or 2 month long tours a year, local album support shows, etc. They were trying to make themselves known.
That particular form of musical entertainment is probably not compatible in a smaller market.

Recently he's been playing in a blues band 2-3 times a month when they're busy, this ebbs and flows through the year of course.

Estimate 25 shows a month for 2 tours at $50 a night = $2500/year
2 shows a month at $500 = $12000/year

Obviously this is just one example and every musician has a different path through their career.

If you're playing metal or hip hop or folk or whatever, for sure you are going to have to market yourself accordingly and find a local scene that you can work with, big or small city. There are some small places that have great heavy music scenes but is there much money coming out of it?

So keeping this in focus for the OP, I do think that playing rock/pop, singer-songwriter style music gives them an opportunity to explore different markets. You probably won't do very well in a small town if you're playing Death Core but if it's palatable to the masses, you've got more opportunities in more places.

Maybe NYC is the place to be so they can hustle and network and build their brand so they can get good financial opportunities but it may not always be the best strategy for simply selling themselves and getting paid well early in a musical career.

Maybe NYC isn't the best place to start out due to the cost of rent, transportation, etc. but there are other big cities that are cheaper to live in as well.

In the example I'm using, $12000 a year is what, 6 months rent in NYC? it could potentially cover a year or more in a small-medium cheaper city.

A second small city example I can give is a friend who just put out is first album in his home town. He's known in the community outside of his music (because everyone knows everyone there!) and he sold out 2 nights, 130 people a night at $20 a ticket. $5200 from his first advertised solo show. Of course you have to subtract gear rentals, album production cost as well but that's a pretty good start for a new artist in a small town!
Old 3rd May 2018
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
The person I mentioned toured internationally with a synth pop band making $50 a night for years. They got signed to a major, sold out shows in Europe, kept on making that $50. Maybe 1 or 2 month long tours a year, local album support shows, etc. They were trying to make themselves known.
That particular form of musical entertainment is probably not compatible in a smaller market.
Touring internationally and earning $50 a night for years! Where were they gigging, Biafra? There are buskers in NYC who make a lot more than that in a few hours.

Quote:
Estimate 25 shows a month for 2 tours at $50 a night = $2500/year
2 shows a month at $500 = $12000/year
Your math is incorrect...25x50x12 is $15,000

Quote:
Obviously this is just one example and every musician has a different path through their career.
Generally speaking, you stand a better chance of gigging more and making more money in a big city than in a small town, regardless of the style of music you play. This is not to say there aren't a few people who might make a good living in a small town and who might even get 'discovered', but they are the exception, not the rule.

Quote:
A second small city example I can give is a friend who just put out is first album in his home town. He's known in the community outside of his music (because everyone knows everyone there!) and he sold out 2 nights, 130 people a night at $20 a ticket. $5200 from his first advertised solo show. Of course you have to subtract gear rentals, album production cost as well but that's a pretty good start for a new artist in a small town!
How much money did he actually take home and how many times can he do this in a year...?
Old 3rd May 2018
  #17
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Samc, maybe some real world examples from your experience would help?
As you're sig says...


Touring is expensive! It costs $6000 just to get 4 guys across the ocean. $50 a player is what is left over after travel and boarding.
My math was based on 2 month long tours per year.
Generally speaking, you may be correct, but what kind of numbers you are thinking about here?
Not sure what the final was on the album release I mentioned, but how many artists make $2500 on their 1st night as an unknown in a big city? We all have roughly the same costs when it comes to putting out an album in the first place.

These are all just perspectives and besides that fact that music isn't just about the money, the money can be great if you apply smart business practices.

I think this is an interesting discussion to have and we could all learn from it.
Can you give examples of what sort of money someone would pull by moving to NYC and how long they would expect to go before profiting?

If you have an actual experience to share, I'd really like to hear it and we can learn from each other. I'm sure lots of us have fantasized about moving to NYC and really making it in the industry there. It really is an amazing city.
Old 3rd May 2018
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
Samc, maybe some real world examples from your experience would help?
I heard a fresh sounding four piece R&B/soul band in the NYC subway that played original music and always attracted a crowd even during rush hour. I liked them so much that I asked a club owner/promoter to come listen and he liked them so much that he booked them to play in his club. They played three successful nights, in this well known village jazz bar and sold a lot of CDs. A couple of weeks later they were asked to come back and some label dude offered them a deal which they turned down because they were making so much money busking, selling their CDs and playing a few bar/club gigs all in manhattan. MC Hammer was selling his CDs from his car trunk and paying club DJs to play his songs and dace to them at nights in LA. He wouldn't sign at first because he was making a lot more than the label was offering...I heard that he was making over $250,000 a year on his own back then.

Quote:
Touring is expensive! It costs $6000 just to get 4 guys across the ocean. $50 a player is what is left over after travel and boarding.
My math was based on 2 month long tours per year.
Generally speaking, you may be correct, but what kind of numbers you are thinking about here?
You said they were eventually signed and were selling out venues in Europe and still only earning $50 per night. I've worked with a young unsigned reggae band that was earning between 5000 and 8000 euros per gig with no support. On top of that they were selling their own CD at every gig. so the $50 per night for guys that were signed and who were selling out venues sounds very strange to me.

Quote:
Not sure what the final was on the album release I mentioned, but how many artists make $2500 on their 1st night as an unknown in a big city? We all have roughly the same costs when it comes to putting out an album in the first place.
The gross was $2600 per night, was there a net amount after costs and if so what was it?

Quote:
These are all just perspectives and besides that fact that music isn't just about the money, the money can be great if you apply smart business practices.
It may not be just about the money, but if someone wants to do this professionally they better make money to survive.

Quote:
I think this is an interesting discussion to have and we could all learn from it.
Can you give examples of what sort of money someone would pull by moving to NYC and how long they would expect to go before profiting?

If you have an actual experience to share, I'd really like to hear it and we can learn from each other. I'm sure lots of us have fantasized about moving to NYC and really making it in the industry there. It really is an amazing city.
There is no formula and there are other benefits than just making money, there are more opportunities to network with a lot of other people in the business, and to be seen by a lot more people than in some small town. You can gig with a lot of other musicians and record too all the while gaining valuable experience and there's a better chance that you can hookup and gig/tour with another band while developing your own thing. The hustle might not be for everybody and there is no guarantee of success, but your chances are probably better than is some small nowhere town.
Old 6th May 2018
  #19
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Thank you guys, this has been a really interesting discussion, and I do think that it's a bit multi-faceted and complex in the modern music industry. I do also think that there are more options than are being discussed.

I'm interested in the thought behind why there are always more paying gigs available in a large music city, even for a newer act despite competition. I suppose if you include things like busking, corporate gigs, house shows, or even driving out to less-competitive areas, then you more than have your numbers. Of course, there is also the higher COL to worry about, but the question was about making money (not necessarily keeping it), and there are ways around many of those costs.

This also brings to mind the question: Do the talented acts always "break through" in a major market? If you can more readily or more reliably build up an audience in, say, a mid-sized town or a less-musical large city, is this not a good career move? Many have argued that location is no longer *essential* even if you're looking for a record contract... that it's more about demonstrating the ability to build and regularly pull an audience, building an online presence, etc...

Of course, this brings to mind the question: If someone is serious in the modern music industry, what IS the right approach? Obviously you need to make money and get exposure, and it seems like the biggest strategies for doing those things pretty much overlap: play live/merch, youtube/online following, music licensing. Without being in a large music-destination city, you're missing the opportunity for some valuable networking and probably music licensing (if that's part of your chosen strategy). But it occurs to me that most of this can be done, and perhaps more readily or more reliably so, without being in a large music-destination city.

I still suspect that the large music-destination city is the wiser choice for someone who is "serious", but I'm not entirely certain, and perhaps there's a middle ground. If your number one focus is making money, then I'm not convinced that there isn't a more "clever" choice than one of those major destinations, at least at the beginning, and I'm not certain how much you're really sacrificing the opportunity for big success by not being in one of them. (People often say differently, but I'm not clear as to why.) One thing that occurs to me is that most serious musicians DO seem to relocate to one of the big music-destination cities; if nothing else, serious industry people may write you off for being elsewhere(?), but I imagine that will change more over time.

Samc, since much of the focus was on NYC, I'm wondering how you'd factor other large music-destination cities into the equation. Namely Los Angeles, but I also think that New Orleans and Nashville would be interesting considerations in terms of this discussion. They are smaller cities that are still "big" music towns.
Old 6th May 2018
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nerry2 View Post
Samc, since much of the focus was on NYC, I'm wondering how you'd factor other large music-destination cities into the equation. Namely Los Angeles, but I also think that New Orleans and Nashville would be interesting considerations in terms of this discussion. They are smaller cities that are still "big" music towns.
First thing: My opinions should be taken generally, this is not an exact science and I'm not trying to make predictions. The things I've mentioned are general trends I have noticed over decades of working in the business in various parts of the world and in particularly in NY.

There are more paying gigs in a big music city like NYC compared to small or medium town is simply because there are a lot more opportunities. In a city like NY there are literally thousands of gigging opportunities seven days per week and at all hours...most small or medium towns won't afford this.

"Breaking through" means different things to different people...the guys I met in the subway never headlined at Glastonbury as far as I know, but they were more than content with their situation. It is unlikely that every artist/band in NY will realize their ultimate dreams, but that was not your original question and it was never my claim, and as far as I know only a snake oil salesman can give that type of assurance.

Your original question was: "What are some of the best cities to make money playing music", and yes, there are special cases where people in different situations have realized their dreams, but I'm sure that most people are not doing that in small towns.
Old 6th May 2018
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
Maybe they're doing fine where they are? Maybe they're trying to "make it" in the industry in a different way, ie; getting known? Maybe the haven't had the same experience or thought about trying it? Maybe they tried it and had a different experience depending on their market? Can't speak for them obviously.

The person I mentioned toured internationally with a synth pop band making $50 a night for years. They got signed to a major, sold out shows in Europe, kept on making that $50. Maybe 1 or 2 month long tours a year, local album support shows, etc. They were trying to make themselves known.
That particular form of musical entertainment is probably not compatible in a smaller market.

Recently he's been playing in a blues band 2-3 times a month when they're busy, this ebbs and flows through the year of course.

Estimate 25 shows a month for 2 tours at $50 a night = $2500/year
2 shows a month at $500 = $12000/year

Obviously this is just one example and every musician has a different path through their career.

If you're playing metal or hip hop or folk or whatever, for sure you are going to have to market yourself accordingly and find a local scene that you can work with, big or small city. There are some small places that have great heavy music scenes but is there much money coming out of it?

So keeping this in focus for the OP, I do think that playing rock/pop, singer-songwriter style music gives them an opportunity to explore different markets. You probably won't do very well in a small town if you're playing Death Core but if it's palatable to the masses, you've got more opportunities in more places.

Maybe NYC is the place to be so they can hustle and network and build their brand so they can get good financial opportunities but it may not always be the best strategy for simply selling themselves and getting paid well early in a musical career.

Maybe NYC isn't the best place to start out due to the cost of rent, transportation, etc. but there are other big cities that are cheaper to live in as well.

In the example I'm using, $12000 a year is what, 6 months rent in NYC? it could potentially cover a year or more in a small-medium cheaper city.

A second small city example I can give is a friend who just put out is first album in his home town. He's known in the community outside of his music (because everyone knows everyone there!) and he sold out 2 nights, 130 people a night at $20 a ticket. $5200 from his first advertised solo show. Of course you have to subtract gear rentals, album production cost as well but that's a pretty good start for a new artist in a small town!
Anyone going on an international tour for 50.00 dollars a show deserves that! That is so far below scale that it doesn't even matter! 150.00 is the going rate for a Church gig on a Sunday in L.A. Nobody Pro leaves town for that kind of money. That is plain exploitation! That should have been more like 1200.00 a week. Sold out shows for 50.00 a show for 2 months in Europe? Naw.
Old 7th May 2018
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
Anyone going on an international tour for 50.00 dollars a show deserves that! That is so far below scale that it doesn't even matter! 150.00 is the going rate for a Church gig on a Sunday in L.A. Nobody Pro leaves town for that kind of money. That is plain exploitation! That should have been more like 1200.00 a week. Sold out shows for 50.00 a show for 2 months in Europe? Naw.
What do you make when you tour?

Here's a great account of what it's like to be in a band today with detailed numbers. (TL:DR, the band looses money by touring)

This Band Just Finished A 28 Day Tour And Made How Much?!


Regardless of that, how much do people reading this make on an average night in their own city?
I think that's what this thread is really about.

Let's say tonight, here in Toronto, a show is happening at a venue that holds 200 people. 3 bands play, 4 members each.

Cover is $5 and the bands take the door. 120 people show up.
$600 comes from the door, split equally thats $50 a player. Was there a promoter? That's a cut. Was there a door person? That's a cut. Merch table person? That's a cut. They're probably down to about $20 a player at that point. This is a pretty normal night in the local music scene.

If it was a DJ night, a person could walk onto the stage with a USB stick and take $4-500. Every show will pay differently until an artist is established and can set proper terms.

In another venue, there may be a killer cover band who has a good rep and charges $4000 for the night. How much a band or musician makes in a night is a broad question.

So, for your band, or your average musician that you know, either playing casual gigs or really trying to make it their sole business, what are the numbers? How does it work for you? How do you make it work?

A band getting nothing on tour is standard fare. If you've dealt with labels, you'll know there's good deals, bad deals and everything in between depending on your situation.
Old 7th May 2018
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
What do you make when you tour?

Here's a great account of what it's like to be in a band today with detailed numbers. (TL:DR, the band looses money by touring)

This Band Just Finished A 28 Day Tour And Made How Much?!
This is not what it cost to tour today, this is just an account of what it cost this particular band to produce their first tour on their own and you should note that while the organization lost money none of the musicians made $50 per gig. I not only think they made mistakes I also think there are details and specifics that we didn't read about.

If your band is selling out venues and selling records, $50 per gig is well below the norm and needs some explaining.

Quote:
Regardless of that, how much do people reading this make on an average night in their own city?
I think that's what this thread is really about.
I have already responded that none of the bands/musicians I know in NYC earn as low as $50 per night...several of the musicians have residencies in a different venue for each day of the week and they also tour during the spring and summer months.

Quote:
Let's say tonight, here in Toronto, a show is happening at a venue that holds 200 people. 3 bands play, 4 members each.

Cover is $5 and the bands take the door. 120 people show up.
$600 comes from the door, split equally thats $50 a player. Was there a promoter? That's a cut. Was there a door person? That's a cut. Merch table person? That's a cut. They're probably down to about $20 a player at that point. This is a pretty normal night in the local music scene.
I often find that in this type of speculative scenario where we can just twiddle the numbers as we like is usually not reflective of the real world. I can tell the same story with very different numbers to support another POV. Plus this is very different from someone playing in a signed band that is selling CDs and selling out venues and earning $50 a night half way across the globe.

Quote:
A band getting nothing on tour is standard fare. If you've dealt with labels, you'll know there's good deals, bad deals and everything in between depending on your situation.
This has not been my experience with over three decades on the road in all corners of the globe, and with all kinds of bands. If a band goes on the road and did not earn anything they either did something very wrong, or they did this on purpose.

Anybody who is going on tour can and should know exactly how much they will earn for the tour before the tour starts, and the people who plan the tour should have a what the tour finances are to within a few dollars...if they're not guessing their way through the process.
Old 7th May 2018
  #24
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Smile

Hi Sam. If you don't mind me asking...

Are you the same Sam Clayton, that sings and plays percussion?
(also in Little Feat?)

Thanks, Chris
Old 7th May 2018
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
Hi Sam. If you don't mind me asking...

Are you the same Sam Clayton, that sings and plays percussion?
(also in Little Feat?)

Thanks, Chris
No, I’m not.
Old 7th May 2018
  #26
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OK-Thanks. Chris
Old 24th August 2018
  #27
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In the USA, I would say

Seattle, WA
Portland, OR
SF/Oakland, CA
Los Angeles, CA
Denver, CO
Austin, TX
Nashville, TN
Chicago, IL
New York, NY
Philadelphia, PA
New Orleans, LA

I'm sure there are more. Consider the probable target demographic of your music, and whether that lines up with regional tastes.

Where I live on the California coast, much of the demand comes from wineries and craft breweries, beaches and related tourism, and weddings. They don't want contemporary pop-rock, indie shoegaze, rap, or metal -- nothing aggressive or loud or experimental. They want tastefully done Americana, neo-soul, and folky surf music like Jack Johnson. Comfortable, familiar, vintage-y pleasant music that fits into a particular kind of experience people are willing to pay for.

There are plenty of acts that make a living from music that never "made it" in the traditional sense of being promoted nationally on radio or in the press. But they play music for a living and don't have day jobs. Acts like Devil Makes Three, T Sisters, Slightly Stoopid, California Honeydrops.
Old 28th August 2018
  #28
In my experience it's a really tough go trying to do it on your own as an indie artist.

You'd better have something unique to offer. You'd better be memorable. You'd better have great material. You'd better be polished and undeniably talented.

In that case, you might be able to do something sustainable. Expect to have many "irons in the fire" to stay afloat, depending on your lifestyle expectations.

If you don't have all of those qualities, then you may need to latch onto other tactics to make yourself more attractive to venues, for example finding ways to use elements of your show to help the venue sell more booze, etc, etc. I've seen a few bands be successful doing this. One for instance basically is as much like the host of a party than a band...... Another one has a full blown comedy routine......I absolutely wouldn't want to do it, but hey, these types of entertainment-heavy acts have a strong party crowd following, and are able to play full time as a result.

You will also find that certain areas are much more accessible for certain genres than others. In my region, country is #1 in terms of live shows by a very wide margin. Blues, Rock, and Jazz have some limited inroads. Pop and Rap is almost nonexistent. This can vary widely across regions. Know your market.

Are you sold on YOUR OWN music? I make far more playing for a signed act (and play some really nice shows) than I ever could doing my own thing, without all of the headaches. Might be something to consider, and keep your solo stuff as a backup when things are slow.
Old 28th August 2018
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry123 View Post
If you've dealt with labels, you'll know there's good deals, bad deals and everything in between depending on your situation.
"Good deals"

BWAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

HA

HA

HAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
Old 22nd October 2018
  #30
Here for the gear
 

On my opinion it's may be New York
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