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Band wants pro tools files to finish at another studio. DAW Software
Old 29th November 2017
  #1
Band wants pro tools files to finish at another studio.

I've been working on a project with this soul band. 9 people in the band, full horn section, everyone also sings. Needless to say it's been a long project. We've been going at it a couple days/week for a few months and are just putting the finishing touches and last vocals on.

This morning I got a message from the band leader that they want to take the pro tools files to another studio to finish it because of a "personal connection" with this other engineer. I'm friends with the engineer and shocked that this is happening from both ends. Am I wrong for being offended?
Old 1st December 2017
  #2
Deleted User
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Just get paid and say goodbye, simple. Dont be shocked, bands think some other engineer is always gonna somehow make their POS songs better, dont sweat it

I wouldnt give them my mixes at all. Wave files in a Protools session, here ya go
Old 1st December 2017
  #3
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

It happens. It'll happen in reverse, too. Sometimes you're the bug, as they say.

When it has happened to me, and it has and still does, yes it has hurt my feelings. But I've found it's best to take the high road and give them an archive of everything, plugins and mixes and all, along with an open invitation to get in touch if there's something they can't figure out. In the long run, it's way more about the relationships than anything else.

But don't do any of it if they still owe you money.
Old 5th December 2017
  #4
Gear Addict
 

I'd give him an empty session with just the audio. After all bills are paid
Old 6th December 2017
  #5
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by godofmetalguita
I'm friends with the engineer and shocked that this is happening from both ends. Am I wrong for being offended?
IMO, you are not wrong for being pissed at the engineer if he did anything active to get the session moved to his place. That's not a "friend". When I was starting out, I had situations where some engineer "whispered in the band's ear" that he was much better than me, or that I was 'ruining' their song, and for some reason there are a lot of morons who take such statements at face value. Well if A is badmouthing B, and B is not badmouthing him back, then B must suck.

Funny thing is, Karma is a bitch. Those engineers and their studios are long gone and I am still here.

But you are wrong if you are offended at the client. Keep in mind is their project, if they told you at the beginning that they wanted to come to you to start the basics and then they intended to finish or mix elsewhere, you certainly would not have turned down the part of the job they did offer you. It is only your expectation to have the whole job that makes you feel hurt.

We engineers charge by the hour. The upside is that you can say no anytime you like. The downside is that the client can say no anytime they like. Very very few of us have any greater implied 'contract' than that - at least not as engineers. Suppose they gave up on the project - the band broke up or something.

Now if you are insecure about your skills and you think they may be somewhat justified in leaving you for another studio, maybe you should take it as a learning experience. Figure out if any of it is partly your own fault. If your work is good quality, it should speak for itself. Even if this band does not realize it now, they may realize it in the future, so don't close the door.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
In the long run, it's way more about the relationships than anything else.
I agree. You will l lose a lot more if you get a reputation for being difficult or petty. The more professional you are about it, the more likely they are to come back if the other studio doesn't work out. And remember, there are 9 people in that band, any one of whom might be the leader of a new band down the line.
Old 23rd December 2017
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
It happens. It'll happen in reverse, too. Sometimes you're the bug, as they say.

When it has happened to me, and it has and still does, yes it has hurt my feelings. But I've found it's best to take the high road and give them an archive of everything, plugins and mixes and all, along with an open invitation to get in touch if there's something they can't figure out. In the long run, it's way more about the relationships than anything else.

But don't do any of it if they still owe you money.
Kind of happening to me right now - a project I’ve produced has been signed, and their manager now wants another guy to mix 3 out of 4 tracks we’ve recorded. It’s also a friend! (Who’s worked with them before).

Am I offended? Not at all - they’ve not even heard what my mix will sound like, and I’m still mixing 3 songs for the project.

If it were someone I didn’t know, I might be a bit more cut and dried and decide how I’m sending it to him; in this case, I’ll ask how he wants it. But I’ll print some of the processing and I’ll ask him to respect certain elements - as the producer I’d only ask for those changes to be reimplemented, so it makes sense to start off correctly!

It’s also not a band decision - they still want me to finish it apparently! I personally don’t mind at all at this point - it’s not something I’m over precious about and I know the other guy is good.
Old 29th December 2017
  #7
You don’t mention if you have been paid yet. This is key. Make sure you are paid in full before you give them anything but once you are paid give them everything.

Its their project after all and you will never regret doing a good professional job.
Old 29th December 2017
  #8
Get paid. Give them everything. Show confidence and leave a great impression.

As is often the case, bands fall in love with the board mixes anyways, which would lead them back to you. (Assuming said good impression was indeed left).
Old 14th February 2018
  #9
Lives for gear
 
BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
many bands track in studio A, for the rooms and the mikes, then mix in studio B for the monitoring and the desk. then master in studio C for the Gear and the Ears.

some engineers are better at tracking, some better at mixing. Freelance guys move around.

its Normal and Pro. ring and ask the mix engineer how he wants the files, and give him hat he wants, to the best of your ability.

smile and its easy. Buddha
Old 14th February 2018
  #10
This


Quote:
Originally Posted by nspaas View Post
Get paid. Give them everything. Show confidence and leave a great impression.

As is often the case, bands fall in love with the board mixes anyways, which would lead them back to you. (Assuming said good impression was indeed left).
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