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Acoustic Design Question
Old 13th April 2006
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
arpodthegreat's Avatar
 

Acoustic Design Question

I'm currently taking an acoustics class (basically physics of sound) and we are supposed to do a research project on something that interests us. i would love to do something on acoustic design of recording studios namely tracking and mixing rooms. what makes a room good to mix in or master in? how do you design a room that will sound good for drums? how do you acoustically treat a room. if you guys could point me towards any books that would be awesome. the more technical the better but i don't mind if it's not all numbers either. any other pointers would be great too. thanks
Old 13th April 2006
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by arpodthegreat
I'm currently taking an acoustics class (basically physics of sound) and we are supposed to do a research project on something that interests us. i would love to do something on acoustic design of recording studios namely tracking and mixing rooms. what makes a room good to mix in or master in? how do you design a room that will sound good for drums? how do you acoustically treat a room. if you guys could point me towards any books that would be awesome. the more technical the better but i don't mind if it's not all numbers either. any other pointers would be great too. thanks
Everest. The Master Handbook of Acoustics. A must-have.
Old 13th April 2006
  #3
Lives for gear
 
by-tor's Avatar
 

Good forum:

http://www.johnlsayers.com/
Old 13th April 2006
  #4
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayfrigo
Everest. The Master Handbook of Acoustics. A must-have.
I second that!! I have that book on my desk at all times.. It is like the bible to me!!

also order

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159...17606?n=283155

Glenn
Old 13th April 2006
  #5
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Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Lightbulb

Arpod,

> what makes a room good to mix in or master in? how do you design a room that will sound good for drums? how do you acoustically treat a room. <

The book links you got are a great resource, and I can add a little more here.

A good sounding room is one that has minimal resonances, and minimal comb filtering due to reflections from nearby surfaces. This translates to "large rooms are usually better than small rooms." Resonances at low frequencies are determined by the room dimensions, and at higher frequencies by flutter echo between two opposing parallel surfaces. So designing and treating a room go hand in hand.

All "home size" rooms have resonances at low frequencies, so all such rooms need plenty of bass trapping. The more bass trapping you have, the flatter the response will be, and the less low frequency ringing too. You can "design out" flutter echo by building a room with angled walls. If you don't have the luxury of building a new room, you can treat parallel walls - and the ceiling if the floor is reflective - with absorption or possibly diffusion.

For much more info see my Acoustics FAQ:

www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html

It's not a whole book, but it's free. heh

--Ethan
Old 13th April 2006
  #6
Registered User
 
Anderson's Avatar
 

Hi!

When I studied, the DTU (Danish technical university) and Chalmers (Gothenburg, Sweden) or The Stockholm University were bottomless resources on Acoustics, don't hesitate to contact them. I think you could also get in contact with Bruel & Kjaer, best company/most advanced in the world in that field IMHO. Based in Denmark. I think Chalmers has an Anechoic room btw - crazy stuff!

I work as a Studio Designer, dealing with studio acoustics for a living. If you want more infos, don't hesitate to mail me or PM me! I pbly can give you some hints... and lots of numbers if you want!

Have you work on the Fourier Transfer Function already? Ray-tracing and hybrid calculation methods for modeling - Scattering problems in image/sources models - front to back rejection schemes? All these are used for studio design. Anyway, I'm there if you need help...

Cheers!
Old 13th April 2006
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
arpodthegreat's Avatar
 

wow thanks for all the response!

Have you work on the Fourrier Transfer Function already? Ray-tracing and hybrid calculation methods for modeling - Scattering problems in image/sources models - front to back rejection schemes? All these are used for studio design. Anyway, I'm there if you need help...

Cheers![/QUOTE]


i haven't learned any of that stuff actually. i guess it's up to me to teach myself those things. we only started talking about basic resonance in class and did some basic standing wave stuff. looks like i'm in for some pretty gnarly stuff! hope i can figure it out.
Old 13th April 2006
  #8
Registered User
 
Anderson's Avatar
 

Yep, don't forget the aspirine... and the coffee mug

Actually, all the standing waves / resonances etc phenomena are rather easy to deal with and not too complicated when it comes to the theory (rather logical).

It gets ugly when you start the Room Shaping part of the design (which comes first, always). This is when you need to design/work on the way the acoustic waves will "spread" in the room, and how you can influence that "spreading". After you've shaped the room (optimized, and, hum , compromised...) usually you know to some degree what's left to treat and you start designing the panels. But it's much, MUCH harder to calculate what's needed in a shaped room than in a regular "rectangular" room (ever tried calculating the modes of a shaped room? OMG!). I systematically require the help of a computer with a good modeling program. Otherwise it would take me weeks.

Sorry, bit enthusiastic here, but I hardly ever get to speak about my work!

Cheers!
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