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Chris Whealy's Porous Absorber Calculator - v 1.53
Old 21st September 2009
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Chris Whealy's Porous Absorber Calculator - v 1.53

Fwiw, I just found out that Chris Whealy has recently put out a new version of his Porous Absorber Calculator, which is compatible with Office 2007.

Porous Absorber Calculator V1.53
Old 21st September 2009
  #2
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avare's Avatar
 

Thanks. It is a marvelous tool for room absorption design! I do not understand why it is not more popular.

Andre
Old 21st September 2009
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
cborg's Avatar
 

Lovely!
It's a great tool.
Old 22nd September 2009
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Thanks, I've been looking for something like that for a while, but I couldn't find this one. Bookmarked.
Old 9th October 2009
  #5
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Seamus TM's Avatar
 

I finally just played around with it today.
I have to say, Andre, you are not kidding.
You had suggested to me quite some time ago to use standard "pink fluffy" insulation at about 16" thick to build a trap in the back of my room.

Assuming that the gas flow resistance of the pink is about 5,000 rayls/m, that is an amazing combo.

I'm questioning if I should even bother with high density/thinner panels at all, at this point.

Thanks!
Seamus
Old 9th October 2009
  #6
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avare's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mumblesound View Post
I have to say, Andre, you are not kidding.
You had suggested to me quite some time ago to use standard "pink fluffy" insulation at about 16" thick to build a trap in the back of my room.

Assuming that the gas flow resistance of the pink is about 5,000 rayls/m, that is an amazing combo.
Yup. Sound absorption by porous materials, like so many other things in acoustics, is not intuitive. Unfortunately most people do not take the time to research these things to find what is, after studying them, obvious design factors. Yes, the gas flow resistivity of "pink flufffy" is around 5,000 mks rayls/m.

Some one posted a few days ago on a related thread about taking some aspirin after reading the thread. I have trying since then to come up with a snappy line like "Acoustics, the study of which made Bayer (the inventor of Aspirin) rich."

Quote:
I'm questioning if I should even bother with high density/thinner panels at all, at this point.
It depends on what you are trying to achieve. Good luck!

If you are studying acoustics, you can get Aspirin a cheaper by the case, and it lasts several days longer.

Studiously,
Andre
Andre
Old 9th October 2009
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Seamus TM's Avatar
 

HA!
Thanks for the advice.
I'm sticking with the Excedrin Migrane.

Seamus
Old 10th October 2009
  #8
Gear Nut
 
kraskland's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mumblesound View Post
I'm questioning if I should even bother with high density/thinner panels at all, at this point.
Unless you've got no space for thicker panels, I can't think of a good reason to use higher density. Maybe if you want to absorb mostly higher frequencies?

The calculator really is an awesome tool.
Old 8th December 2019
  #9
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initself's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seamus TM View Post
I'm sticking with the Excedrin Migrane.
I'm a Bayer man, myself.
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