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Advice with my room? Ear fatigue is a major issue.
Old 13th June 2019
  #1
Advice with my room? Ear fatigue is a major issue.

I really, really want to figure this out. I have a room with awkward door location (blocks the front right corner), and a corner vocal booth build in the back left. My plan is to remove the corner booth entirely, so the room can be treated evenly. I really don't know what to do about the door location, but I'm all ears.

My issues with this room:

1) Ear fatigue. Especially when working on songs that have heavy low end (trailers are an example), I find my head gets that stuffed-with-cotton feel in no time.
2) My mixes tend to be heavy on the lows.
3) When listening to other people's music, there's a weight missing, and kicks feel quite weak. I've somewhat helped this by using Sonarworks Reference 4 with a B&K 1974 target curve.
4) My stereo field feels strange... things have to be very panned to feel like they're to the right or left.

Something to note is that while getting my speakers closer to the front wall per advice from GIK, I didn't realize my speakers are now infront of the first reflection treatment on the walls and cloud. But I can't easily move those forward, since the right wall has a light switch and door in the way, and I'd need to shift the cloud forward which requires redrilling. So before tackling that, I wanted to get feedback on the room.

I just calibrated REW and did some measurements. REW file: https://www.dropbox.com/s/frsn18c7gq...3.19.mdat?dl=0

Images of the studio: https://imgur.com/a/MEzAvGy

Studio dimensions: https://imgur.com/a/gbi5P7a

So, how would you approach this? The ear fatigue is really, really frustrating at the moment. That's the most important thing. I read on a post here that it could be to do with desk reflections, or to do with the room being too dead in the highs. Is that relevant according to my measurements?
Old 16th June 2019
  #2
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boggy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post
I really, really want to figure this out. I have a room with awkward door location (blocks the front right corner), and a corner vocal booth build in the back left. My plan is to remove the corner booth entirely, so the room can be treated evenly. I really don't know what to do about the door location, but I'm all ears.
Yes, vocal booth is too much for this room.
Door location is a problem... I recommend different treatment mounted on the door and making symmetrical treatment on the other wall.
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post
My issues with this room:

1) Ear fatigue. Especially when working on songs that have heavy low end (trailers are an example), I find my head gets that stuffed-with-cotton feel in no time.
Your bass treatment is not serious.
Also, well treated but too dead room will introduce ear fatigue to some people.
Please read carefully:MyRoom Acoustic Design
and this:
MyRoom Acoustic Design Mark II

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post


2) My mixes tend to be heavy on the lows.
You cannot control what you cannot hear.
SBIR caused dips will be second problem in your room

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post
3) When listening to other people's music, there's a weight missing, and kicks feel quite weak. I've somewhat helped this by using Sonarworks Reference 4 with a B&K 1974 target curve.
4) My stereo field feels strange... things have to be very panned to feel like they're to the right or left.
I see no reason for that diffusers placed "somewhere" in the room, except to treat flutter echo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post

Something to note is that while getting my speakers closer to the front wall per advice from GIK, I didn't realize my speakers are now infront of the first reflection treatment on the walls and cloud. But I can't easily move those forward, since the right wall has a light switch and door in the way, and I'd need to shift the cloud forward which requires redrilling. So before tackling that, I wanted to get feedback on the room.

I just calibrated REW and did some measurements. REW file: https://www.dropbox.com/s/frsn18c7gq...3.19.mdat?dl=0
please, undo that "calibration" and make new measurements... you use your actual room response for "calibration".
I do not understand why this start message about "calibration" still exist in REW.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post

Images of the studio: https://imgur.com/a/MEzAvGy

Studio dimensions: https://imgur.com/a/gbi5P7a

So, how would you approach this? The ear fatigue is really, really frustrating at the moment. That's the most important thing. I read on a post here that it could be to do with desk reflections, or to do with the room being too dead in the highs. Is that relevant according to my measurements?
Yes you need a heavy treatment for many reasons but not dead room... please read that two theads above and you will find a way how to treat your room.


I hope I help you

Old 16th June 2019
  #3
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PatrickFaith's Avatar
 

For smaller rooms I do near field monitoring at between 1.2 to 1.4 meters, also have the speakers at ear level with the "circle"/triangle point just behind my head. Hard to measure exactly with your setup but the speakers seem farther then 1.4 meters from center, at 1.2 meters nearfield speakers should sound great for post work and not have the reflections because the calibrated db at that point will be less. Atleast that approach doesnt require more traps. Of course i have 2x2x8 foot base traps in every corner of my room and i still have problems mixing the lfe lows.
Old 16th June 2019
  #4
SRS
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That is a large desk and can be contributing to reflections. But that is not your primary concern. The "diffusers" are not really doing anything to contribute to your acoustical treatment. Bass trapping would be more beneficial than those diffusers. Also, symmetry, as mentioned, is of utmost importance, especially for your left/right imaging. Stay closer to your monitors with a proper convergence angle and do not monitor too loud or with excessive bass. In a smaller room, often, keeping it more on the "dead" side can be helpful, so long as you have plenty of bass trapping. Symmetry is the key.
Old 16th June 2019
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by SRS View Post
That is a large desk and can be contributing to reflections. But that is not your primary concern. The "diffusers" are not really doing anything to contribute to your acoustical treatment. Bass trapping would be more beneficial than those diffusers. Also, symmetry, as mentioned, is of utmost importance, especially for your left/right imaging. Stay closer to your monitors with a proper convergence angle and do not monitor too loud or with excessive bass. In a smaller room, often, keeping it more on the "dead" side can be helpful, so long as you have plenty of bass trapping. Symmetry is the key.

Are you saying to reduce the distance between myself and the monitors? I’ve measured our very carefully to make sure the distance between the speakers and myself are the same.
Old 17th June 2019
  #6
SRS
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I would pay attention to that, yes. And try and reduce it if the low freqs are causing issues. That way you can monitor at lower volumes and not "excite" the room as much. Just a thought.
Old 17th June 2019
  #7
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boggy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxiedaniels View Post
Are you saying to reduce the distance between myself and the monitors? I’ve measured our very carefully to make sure the distance between the speakers and myself are the same.
Increasing distance from listener to monitors, decrease desk reflection influence.
Reducing size of the desk surface decrease desk reflection influence too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SRS View Post
.... you can monitor at lower volumes and not "excite" the room as much. Just a thought.
Room acoustics has linear behavior for SPL range of our interest. So, room modes will be "excited" anyway.

What is not linear is human hearing abilities. When sound level is lower, human hearing start to decrease sensitivity to low frequencies.




Old 17th June 2019
  #8
SRS
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Yessir,,, the ole Fletcher Munson curve. Boggy gotit!
Old 30th June 2019
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SRS View Post
Yessir,,, the ole Fletcher Munson curve. Boggy gotit!
The actually curve show a great lost of sensibility in bass region, more than the old fletcher curve.
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