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Alternative to Spray Glue for Making OC703 Acoustic Panels? Spatial Processor Plugins
Old 3rd April 2019
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Alternative to Spray Glue for Making OC703 Acoustic Panels?

Hi, I am using Owens Corning 703 rigid fiberglass insulation to acoustically treat a room. I have used spray glue in the past to fasten cotton fabric to OC 703 to create frameless panels with the product, and I am wondering if is there any type of caulk, perhaps silicone or otherwise, that would provide a stronger more secure bond between OC 703 insulation and cotton or cotton-blended fabrics. Thanks

I sent this message to Owens Corning, all they told me was

"Our recommendation is to utilize a construction adhesive that is compatible with glass fiber to adhere the boards to concrete."

However, I live in a part of the world where supplies are limited, so I need to be very specific about what exact type of adhesive I'm looking for.... can anyone give me some tips on alternatives to spray glue that could fasten OC703 to concrete? Thanks

PS I know it's possible, see this video of this guy making panels using some type of construction caulk/adhesive... what product is he using???

YouTube
Old 3rd April 2019
  #2
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiobuild View Post
Hi, I am using Owens Corning 703 rigid fiberglass insulation to acoustically treat a room. I have used spray glue in the past to fasten cotton fabric to OC 703 to create frameless panels with the product, and I am wondering if is there any type of caulk, perhaps silicone or otherwise, that would provide a stronger more secure bond between OC 703 insulation and cotton or cotton-blended fabrics. Thanks

I sent this message to Owens Corning, all they told me was

"Our recommendation is to utilize a construction adhesive that is compatible with glass fiber to adhere the boards to concrete."

However, I live in a part of the world where supplies are limited, so I need to be very specific about what exact type of adhesive I'm looking for.... can anyone give me some tips on alternatives to spray glue that could fasten OC703 to concrete? Thanks

PS I know it's possible, see this video of this guy making panels using some type of construction caulk/adhesive... what product is he using???

YouTube
you are going to adhere the panels directly to concrete ?? no material on them ?? i would make wooden frames and then Screw into the concrete for a more secure holding !!!
Old 3rd April 2019
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwh1192 View Post
you are going to adhere the panels directly to concrete ?? no material on them ?? i would make wooden frames and then Screw into the concrete for a more secure holding !!!
no, i'm going to suspend the panels on a custom-built (framed) false ceiling... so all I need is fabric and glue to make frameless panels w/ the 703, and they will float on wood slats... but the spray glues I've worked w/ before are pretty weak, I'm looking for a stronger adhesive...

the suggestion re: concrete came from the manufacturer... e.g. if the adhesive will adhere the OC703 to concrete it will work for fabric...

PS re: making wooden frames then bolting them into concrete, been there done that, it's a pain... that's why I reframed my entire studio w/ wood, new wood subfloor & all, so I don't have to drill into concrete every time I wanna hang an acoustic panel or a picture frame lol
Old 3rd April 2019
  #4
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiobuild View Post
no, i'm going to suspend the panels on a custom-built (framed) false ceiling... so all I need is fabric and glue to make frameless panels w/ the 703, and they will float on wood slats... but the spray glues I've worked w/ before are pretty weak, I'm looking for a stronger adhesive...

the suggestion re: concrete came from the manufacturer... e.g. if the adhesive will adhere the OC703 to concrete it will work for fabric...

PS re: making wooden frames then bolting them into concrete, been there done that, it's a pain... that's why I reframed my entire studio w/ wood, new wood subfloor & all, so I don't have to drill into concrete every time I wanna hang an acoustic panel or a picture frame lol
right on .. smart !!!

there is Construction Adhesive that comes in a Tube like Caulking .. like that guy in the video is using .. too fast to see any labels !!
Old 3rd April 2019
  #5
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dc_r's Avatar
 

What if you just staple fabric cover onto wood?
Old 3rd April 2019
  #6
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Pollo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_r View Post
What if you just staple fabric cover onto wood?
That's what I did and it works, unsuprisingly. I doubt if any type of glue is going to give you the results you want. The fiberglass by itself doesn't hold together very well. Glue is not going to improve that.

If you have something like a bag that fits perfectly around the slab of glassfiber then you could sew it close. Or maybe glue it but cloth doesn't glue that well. If it would, think of the time the clothes industry could save by just glueing clothes together instead of sewing. On the other hand, clothes need to be more rugged than what you need.
Old 3rd April 2019
  #7
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Gluing 703 to the wall won't work. The 703 will come apart and let go of itself, leaving you with a wall covered with a thin layer of itchy yellow fuzz.
Old 3rd April 2019
  #8
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
we used spray adhesive on all the panels we made .. and they are still together !!! but i like the Glue and Staple Solution !!!
Old 3rd April 2019
  #9
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwh1192 View Post
we used spray adhesive on all the panels we made .. and they are still together !!! but i like the Glue and Staple Solution !!!
I've tried that, but with the thin wood strips I use, the staples split the wood.
Old 3rd April 2019
  #10
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I've tried that, but with the thin wood strips I use, the staples split the wood.
ah .. never had that happen, you must be using some really thin wood .. 1"x2" work ok ..

or maybe your Stapler .. is .. well .. lets say yours is bigger than mine !! LOL
Attached Thumbnails
Alternative to Spray Glue for Making OC703 Acoustic Panels?-screen-shot-2019-04-03-12.22.01-pm.jpg  
Old 3rd April 2019
  #11
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwh1192 View Post
right on .. smart !!!

there is Construction Adhesive that comes in a Tube like Caulking .. like that guy in the video is using .. too fast to see any labels !!
Ya, if anyone has specific brand and/or generic terms for this type of caulking, I'd really appreciate it.

I have heard some types of caulk or adhesive will 'melt' rigid fiberglass but other types are ok...?

I might just start running tests on scrap pieces of 703 with random adhesives I have lying around haha

I plan to use the caulk to fasten thin wood framing to the insulation and then staple & glue the fabric
Old 3rd April 2019
  #12
Gear Guru
 

I used a hot glue gun from the hobby store to make my panels. It works really well, IMO


I did not glue the fiberglass however, I glued the fabric to itself on the back side of the panels. Then I "pinched" the edges of the fabric enough to get room to get a staple in there.
Old 3rd April 2019
  #13
Lives for gear
 
nosebleedaudio's Avatar
 

Have used liquid nails (Heavy Duty Only) MANY times over the years (20+) for walls & ceilings and had NO problems...
Old 3rd April 2019
  #14
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bowzin's Avatar
As OP implies, you can certainly make wood-less panels out of OC703 or any of the more rigid products. Definitely not with Roxul Safe N Sound, for example. I've seen people on YouTube do this, just cover a 4" inch or 6" inch thick OC703 panel in fabric, use glue to seal up the fabric.

One guy before he put the fabric on, he jammed a straightened-out coat hanger through the front of the OC703 panel and out the back to create a secure hook to hang it, then put on the fabric and glued up the holes punched through the fabric on the back. It was pretty genius, way lighter and less wood cost & weight. Also a project you could tackle in a city apartment, for example, if you don't have saws available or aren't comfortable with them.

I think this guy used some pretty normal glue (or "fabric glue"? Is that a thing?) and used the glue both on the panel itself to keep the fabric tight against the panel, and also glued it fabric-to-fabric, like joeq is saying.

OP: just look for "construction adhesive" or "Liquid Nails" which is a brand name. It comes in a caulk-style tube, but it's adhesive (glue). You'll need a caulk gun to use it. Read the fine-print and see if it works on the materials you'll be using, but honestly that stuff is insanely powerful so might be worth taking a shot on something that looks close. You don't need the most expensive, or the absolute max strength stuff, that is for doing things like securing an under-counter sink (the heavy sink full of dishes is held in place entirely just by the powerful glue). Too powerful a batch might even eat through the fiberglass or something, so just try a general-use construction adhesive is what I would say, it's not expensive, few bucks a tube.

I have a humble little wood shop so I've made acoustic panels a bunch of different ways, eventually settling on 1x6 or 1x8 lumber (untreated, not the green stuff for decking... that's way more expensive and also full of heavy metals, the bad kind not the hair band kind). Made simple boxes with wood screws, and pre-drilled the holes to not break the 1" lumber. Honestly they're heavy, so I wouldn't mind the wood-less approach for panels that need to hang on walls/ceiling.

However I do like the box approach for semi-portable "gobo" style panels that just sit on the floor. You can move them around or even stack them, and they're sturdy enough you can set a drink on top of them, etc. I got the cost down to $16 per gobo... including mineral wool, wood, screws, and fabric. To make them stand, I would cover it entirely in fabric, then spray paint flat black a separate piece of wood that was wider than the bottom footprint and screw it on to the bottom to make a sturdy stand (or two smaller pieces of wood on each end screwed in perpendicular to make "feet" that stick out). Some of them I added a flat black piece of wood to the top as well, to make a small little table you can set picks/drinks on top, or to be able to stack them easily wood-on-wood without the fabric in the way.

I also made some massive 12"-15" thick bass traps, and put those on rubber wheels, those turned out great.
Old 3rd April 2019
  #15
Gear Nut
 

I used stretch material for my panels. My wife is good with this stuff, she came up with the solution.

She measured the outside dimension of the panel (circumference I guess is the closest word) and cut the fabric to a little less than this and sewed a seam down the length, making a long tube.

She then turned it inside out, so that the seam was on the inside and rolled the whole tube up on itself.

To install on the panel, she stretched and slipped the rolled up section over the panel, and simply unrolled it down the length of the panel.

It worked great!

-John
Old 4th April 2019
  #16
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Caf View Post
I used stretch material for my panels. My wife is good with this stuff, she came up with the solution.

She measured the outside dimension of the panel (circumference I guess is the closest word) and cut the fabric to a little less than this and sewed a seam down the length, making a long tube.

She then turned it inside out, so that the seam was on the inside and rolled the whole tube up on itself.

To install on the panel, she stretched and slipped the rolled up section over the panel, and simply unrolled it down the length of the panel.

It worked great!

-John

This sounds awesome. How did you seal up the top & bottom ends? Staples? I'd love to see pix of this process...

I wish my wife would chip in like this lol

I've been thinking about hiring a tailor on-site for a day or two to get all the fiberglass upholstered like this... maybe even a zipper, like couch cushions or something... this construction thing is way harder than mixing lol
Old 4th April 2019
  #17
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bowzin View Post
As OP implies, you can certainly make wood-less panels out of OC703 or any of the more rigid products. Definitely not with Roxul Safe N Sound, for example. I've seen people on YouTube do this, just cover a 4" inch or 6" inch thick OC703 panel in fabric, use glue to seal up the fabric.

One guy before he put the fabric on, he jammed a straightened-out coat hanger through the front of the OC703 panel and out the back to create a secure hook to hang it, then put on the fabric and glued up the holes punched through the fabric on the back. It was pretty genius, way lighter and less wood cost & weight. Also a project you could tackle in a city apartment, for example, if you don't have saws available or aren't comfortable with them.

I think this guy used some pretty normal glue (or "fabric glue"? Is that a thing?) and used the glue both on the panel itself to keep the fabric tight against the panel, and also glued it fabric-to-fabric, like joeq is saying.

OP: just look for "construction adhesive" or "Liquid Nails" which is a brand name. It comes in a caulk-style tube, but it's adhesive (glue). You'll need a caulk gun to use it. Read the fine-print and see if it works on the materials you'll be using, but honestly that stuff is insanely powerful so might be worth taking a shot on something that looks close. You don't need the most expensive, or the absolute max strength stuff, that is for doing things like securing an under-counter sink (the heavy sink full of dishes is held in place entirely just by the powerful glue). Too powerful a batch might even eat through the fiberglass or something, so just try a general-use construction adhesive is what I would say, it's not expensive, few bucks a tube.

I have a humble little wood shop so I've made acoustic panels a bunch of different ways, eventually settling on 1x6 or 1x8 lumber (untreated, not the green stuff for decking... that's way more expensive and also full of heavy metals, the bad kind not the hair band kind). Made simple boxes with wood screws, and pre-drilled the holes to not break the 1" lumber. Honestly they're heavy, so I wouldn't mind the wood-less approach for panels that need to hang on walls/ceiling.

However I do like the box approach for semi-portable "gobo" style panels that just sit on the floor. You can move them around or even stack them, and they're sturdy enough you can set a drink on top of them, etc. I got the cost down to $16 per gobo... including mineral wool, wood, screws, and fabric. To make them stand, I would cover it entirely in fabric, then spray paint flat black a separate piece of wood that was wider than the bottom footprint and screw it on to the bottom to make a sturdy stand (or two smaller pieces of wood on each end screwed in perpendicular to make "feet" that stick out). Some of them I added a flat black piece of wood to the top as well, to make a small little table you can set picks/drinks on top, or to be able to stack them easily wood-on-wood without the fabric in the way.

I also made some massive 12"-15" thick bass traps, and put those on rubber wheels, those turned out great.

thanks for the info.

I probably won't have access to the particular brand Liquid Nails...

Would other acrylic adhesives work? I just have no clue about the difference between certain adhesives...

I will likely buy a couple different types of caulk and test them out on scrap pieces first to see how they do before hitting the whole project...
Old 4th April 2019
  #18
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiobuild View Post
thanks for the info.

I probably won't have access to the particular brand Liquid Nails...

Would other acrylic adhesives work? I just have no clue about the difference between certain adhesives...

I will likely buy a couple different types of caulk and test them out on scrap pieces first to see how they do before hitting the whole project...
may we ask where in this crazy world are you located ?? maybe help try and find you a resource near you !!
Old 4th April 2019
  #19
Lives for gear
 
nosebleedaudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by studiobuild View Post
thanks for the info.

I probably won't have access to the particular brand Liquid Nails...

Would other acrylic adhesives work? I just have no clue about the difference between certain adhesives...

I will likely buy a couple different types of caulk and test them out on scrap pieces first to see how they do before hitting the whole project...
I used the Heavy Duty L.N. NOT because of strength but because the viscosity is much lower...I don't pay more for similar results...
But the extra strength is a good thing..

Last edited by nosebleedaudio; 4th April 2019 at 04:22 PM..
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