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Are fiber particles a concern
Old 17th May 2018
  #1
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Thread Starter
Are fiber particles a concern

I am about to start building bass traps as well as wall absorbers with Owen Corning faced rigid fiberglass and am a bit concerned with fiberglass particles floating around after i have them in place. Is this something to be concerned about? Thanks
Old 28th May 2018
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by rochesterDude View Post
I am about to start building bass traps as well as wall absorbers with Owen Corning faced rigid fiberglass and am a bit concerned with fiberglass particles floating around after i have them in place. Is this something to be concerned about? Thanks
yes you should be concerned, I'd spray it with spray adhesive outdoors, it might sound crazy but it stops the fibres from escaping, nearly all acoustic treatment has the fibre glass enclosed with fabric over it in some kind of frame, this will prevent the fibres from escaping in the atmosphere, but bear in mind it's not asbestos! don't let it stop you, the material is legal and safe, wear a mask when handling it and gloves, and you'll be fine.
Old 28th May 2018
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rochesterDude View Post
I am about to start building bass traps as well as wall absorbers with Owen Corning faced rigid fiberglass and am a bit concerned with fiberglass particles floating around after i have them in place. Is this something to be concerned about? Thanks
It is not something that I am concerned about during usage. As properly noted above, while handling/construction, appropriate precautions apply. All 53 of the OC703 absorbers that I've made are fully enclosed in craft polyester felt material.

Nevertheless, I am planning to make three more for my 'data closet/machine room' this week. For your entertainment and my curiosity, I think I'll try a leaf blower across the face of the OC703 with a dark brown polyester felt 'sticky wall' on the far side.

I won't have a good way of measuring the velocity of the air stream. A digital anemometer is $14, but that's the price of two 2x4ft 2-inch OC703's, and I don't care *that* much. However, I'll try it uncovered at 16-ft, 8-ft, 4-ft, and 2-ft distances, then covered with the same range of moving air attacks. There'll be a fresh 1ft-square piece of 1-inch thick OC703 for each trial.

That should create enough data points to make some useful statements about how worried we should be about fibers escaping. Since, in normal usage, the air velocity is at most whatever a typical room cooling fan would produce, I suspect that we'll be solidly in the 'no worry' zone.

Stay tuned.

Last edited by MediaGary; 28th May 2018 at 10:15 PM..
Old 7th June 2018
  #4
In my opinion the rigid fibreglass panels are insufficiently fibrous to be efficiently effective in such use. The more fiberous a material the more effective.

Professionally we stopped using fibreglass in studio construction 30 years ago. it is horrible stuff and dangerous. We had people in hospital because of it.

It's not just a case of using adequate personal protective equipment while installing it, it is all the other work around it that causes great irritation to the workers. Passing cables, installing equipment, and finishing capentry are all going to "disturb" it.

I have removed fabric ceiling panels from older studios where the back sides of the panels have been covered in all the bits that fell off over the years. It does degrade (structurally) over time, especially when subject to vibrations.

Different people have different levels of sensitivity to it, it seems the softer your skin the easier it irritates, so just saying "it doesn't bother me, I don't see a problem" (as many workers do) is a real dumb assed statement.

Fibreglass is an extreme irritant in any circumstance and it's use should be avoided. Fibreglass in the eyes is no joke. In the eyes, if not immediately noticed it can cause abrasions and even ulcers, especially when continuing work in dirty dusty environments like construction.

Any sensible risk assessment will conclude that unless there is no alternative its use should be avoided.

In panel form, especially slightly compressed, the risk is less, BUT, in that form it is far less acoustically effective.

As I said, we've been building studios for 35 years now, and for 30 of those we never used fibreglass. The SOLE reason is the harm it does to the workers, we have more respect for our workers than to put them through the pain of fibreglass exposure.
Old 7th June 2018
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

I'll spare you the details of the time I made a quick run up into my attic to retrieve a drill I'd forgotten -- after I'd already stripped off my fiberglass-contaminated clothes. The insulation up there is some sort of a chopped fiberglass product, not the batting with paper backer, and yes I did contact more of it than I'd planned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuisance View Post
In my opinion the rigid fibreglass panels are insufficiently fibrous to be efficiently effective in such use. The more fiberous a material the more effective.

Professionally we stopped using fibreglass in studio construction 30 years ago. it is horrible stuff and dangerous. We had people in hospital because of it.

It's not just a case of using adequate personal protective equipment while installing it, it is all the other work around it that causes great irritation to the workers. Passing cables, installing equipment, and finishing capentry are all going to "disturb" it.

I have removed fabric ceiling panels from older studios where the back sides of the panels have been covered in all the bits that fell off over the years. It does degrade (structurally) over time, especially when subject to vibrations.

Different people have different levels of sensitivity to it, it seems the softer your skin the easier it irritates, so just saying "it doesn't bother me, I don't see a problem" (as many workers do) is a real dumb assed statement.

Fibreglass is an extreme irritant in any circumstance and it's use should be avoided. Fibreglass in the eyes is no joke. In the eyes, if not immediately noticed it can cause abrasions and even ulcers, especially when continuing work in dirty dusty environments like construction.

Any sensible risk assessment will conclude that unless there is no alternative its use should be avoided.

In panel form, especially slightly compressed, the risk is less, BUT, in that form it is far less acoustically effective.

As I said, we've been building studios for 35 years now, and for 30 of those we never used fibreglass. The SOLE reason is the harm it does to the workers, we have more respect for our workers than to put them through the pain of fibreglass exposure.
Old 15th June 2018
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuisance View Post
As I said, we've been building studios for 35 years now, and for 30 of those we never used fibreglass. The SOLE reason is the harm it does to the workers, we have more respect for our workers than to put them through the pain of fibreglass exposure.
What material are you using instead of fiberglass?
Old 22nd June 2018
  #7
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rochesterDude View Post
I am about to start building bass traps as well as wall absorbers with Owen Corning faced rigid fiberglass and am a bit concerned with fiberglass particles floating around after i have them in place. Is this something to be concerned about? Thanks
Will you not be covering the rigid fiberglass with fabric? I have had great results with fiberglass in my studio. I've just been sure to cover the front of the trap with fabric and the back with cambric (or the same fabric as the front).

If you're nervous about particles then maybe consider doing what the fellow slut offered and spray a light coat of spray adhesive on them. In the past I tried wrapping mine in cling wrap, but it really affected the traps' absorption ability.

The main thing I would be worried about is the off-gassing of the harmful chemicals in those products. I personally use Knoff to avoid the formaldehyde. I used to used OC but kept getting headaches whenever I spent more than an hour in that room. Swapped with Knoff and haven't had any issues since!
Old 18th July 2018
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyc View Post
What material are you using instead of fiberglass?
They are using a lot of recycled cotton waste in those Newell designed rooms. A company in spain “Acustica Integral” makes it.
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