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My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build
Old 15th May 2015
  #1
My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build

Made these 18" x 18" x 47" blocks from OC705 filled with Roxul, capped and wrapped. Thought I would post photos in case they are helpful to anyone here building their own. Cheers.
Attached Thumbnails
My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build-img_0953.jpg   My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build-img_0954.jpg   My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build-img_0962.jpg   My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build-img_0964.jpg   My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build-img_0965.jpg  

My Twist on the Soffit Traps Build-trap2.jpg  
Old 15th May 2015
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Rod Gervais's Avatar
 

Nice traps..... well done......

But they are not "soffit traps".

A soffit is constructed where a wall and ceiling meet..... not a wall/wall corner..... not a wall/wall/floor intersection.

Those are rectangular corner treatments (traps if you wish).

Take care,

Rod
Old 15th May 2015
  #3
Gear Guru
 
Glenn Kuras's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Gervais View Post
Nice traps..... well done......

But they are not "soffit traps".

A soffit is constructed where a wall and ceiling meet..... not a wall/wall corner..... not a wall/wall/floor intersection.

Those are rectangular corner treatments (traps if you wish).

Take care,

Rod
Technically you are right, but since we came out with a product called the "Soffit Trap" people now are using that word as describing the shape.
GIK Acoustics Soffit Bass Trap

Cory, good job.
Old 15th May 2015
  #4
Quote:
we came out with a product called the "Soffit Trap" people now are using that word as describing the shape
Glen nailed it. These were directly inspired by that GIK product.
Old 17th May 2015
  #5
Lives for gear
That is an interesting construction concept! How did you attach the 705 pieces together? Glue?

Would be interested to see before/after room measurements if/when you make them.

Thanks.
Old 17th May 2015
  #6
Yes PL Premium. On the edges it holds wonderfully, on the face it holds well but the material can separate if pulled. <snip>Once you bead and wrap them they are very sound structurally. Experimenting with end caps on the next batch.

I am also making some wedge shaped ones now. Just so much easier for me to eliminate wood entirely from the process. I'm using just insulation, adhesive and wrap. Keeps life simple, like I like it. Ha ha.

For any sort of application where they are going to get moved, bumped or bashed around a lot I would have used wood frames.

Last edited by psycho_monkey; 19th May 2015 at 01:13 AM..
Old 19th May 2015
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Very nice.

Are these better than 4" FRK bass traps?
Old 19th May 2015
  #8
Quote:
Are these better than 4" FRK bass traps?
Depends on the width and height, i.e. if you have every single surface of your room covered in 4" FRK that is going to trump a couple of these, but if you just have a couple small panels 4" thick these will trump them. These are solid 18" x 18" x 47", you can use any volume calculator to compare that with a different panel or trap's volume. Outer layer is 6lb, inner core is 3lb is you want to compare mass. Cheers.
Old 19th May 2015
  #9
Lives for gear
 

I have a square room: 10x10 ft.
I was planning on making 8 bass traps, 4" frk 703: 2x4 ft.
I planned on having 2 in each corner on top of each other so it would actually be 2x8 ft (8ft tall) in each corner.

Would building 4 of your soffit style traps be better? It's thicker but it wouldn't be 8ft tall.

My room has tile floors so the reflections are crazy out of hand right now. I can't hear lowend clearly at all.
Old 19th May 2015
  #10
Two of these comes out just under 8 feet. In my experience anything that is 8 feet will have trouble in real-world rooms, i.e. ceilings are 96" in height theoretically but in practice often 95.5" or whatever. So I build them at just over 47" so that they fit perfectly two high when stacked.

10 x 10 x 8 might not be very favorable dimensions and you might have specific problems you need to address. So best practice is get a test mic and measure the room. Most people don't bother, they just do the corners, some wall panels, and a cloud if they have budget. In practical terms that can work fine even though it might not be optimal, but that depends entirely on your goals for your room. If you want to get it really tight you are going to need to measure, treat, repeat. If you just want some general improvement for home usage either solution should be beneficial. In a tiled room you may need to look at slat absorbers such as John Sayers design, I am currently building out my small room with these.

In the end a bass trap with more mass is going to be more effective so yes 18" x 18" (324 in²) traps will outperform 24" x 4" (96 in²) at any given height.
Old 19th May 2015
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Why does the trap have a third panel against the wall? Why not just make an L instead of a U with the 705?
Old 19th May 2015
  #12
Gear Nut
 
Insulation Man's Avatar
 

Corey - I have never seen this done before. Really good idea, and I am surprised the glue was able to keep the 705 together that well.
Old 19th May 2015
  #13
Quote:
Why does the trap have a third panel against the wall? Why not just make an L instead of a U with the 705?
Sure you can build them wedge shaped too. You would have half the mass but still effective.

Quote:
I have never seen this done before. Really good idea, and I am surprised the glue was able to keep the 705 together that well.
Yeah I had never seen this either so decided to test some ideas and was really pleased with the results. The PL Premium really holds well, you would be surprised how strong these are, I know I was. I'll post photos of next build with adhesive in there so anyone who wants to duplicate can easily do so. Cheers.

I give credit to Glen, Ethan, etc. They spend the money to do the testing so folks like us can just build and use. Very grateful.
Old 19th May 2015
  #14
Lives for gear
 

Woa wait a minute. They did the testing for a different product. How your product performs in comparison is anyone's guess.
Old 20th May 2015
  #15
Quote:
Woa wait a minute. They did the testing for a different product. How your product performs in comparison is anyone's guess.
Absolutely not. This is the product that was tested which I basically copied with a twist: GIK Acoustics Soffit Bass Trap

These have same shape, no wood frame, a tad more size, and weigh the same amount so they should absolutely perform comparably. To be clear I recommend buying Glen and Ethan's products, I have $10K in Real Traps beside me as I speak. I am in no way suggesting my little doodley-doos replace real professional (tested) sound treatment. Full stop. But for the DIYers, it's a new twist that some might enjoy. That's all.
Old 20th May 2015
  #16
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey Milner View Post
Yes PL Premium. On the edges it holds wonderfully, on the face it holds well but the material can separate if pulled. <snip>Once you bead and wrap them they are very sound structurally. Experimenting with end caps on the next batch.

I am also making some wedge shaped ones now. Just so much easier for me to eliminate wood entirely from the process. I'm using just insulation, adhesive and wrap. Keeps life simple, like I like it. Ha ha.

For any sort of application where they are going to get moved, bumped or bashed around a lot I would have used wood frames.
Very interesting idea. I imagine that the fabric wrap would make fairly significant contribution to the finished strength. As you say, maybe not strong enough to survive lots of banging around, but pretty strong for stationary long term use.

A possibly complimentary adhesive use-- When I was making light-wood-framed, burlap-skinned absorbers-- There is a caulk-gun adhesive Loktite Power Grab clear. A Power Grab for interior use, and a Power Grab Plus for exterior use which costs about a dollar more. I usually used the Power Grab Plus "just because" though for interior use perhaps either would be equivalent.

I am confident that something like your PL Premium would glue the 705 pieces together best.

But the Power Grab applies white then dries completely clear and non-staining. It seems about equivalent in use to aliphatic wood glue, though most good wood glues do not dry completely clear.

I would staple burlap to my frames, then run a bead of Power Grab on-top of the fabric over each wood strut, and rub it in with a finger, so the glue soaks thru the fabric and covers the underlying wood. After a few hours drying, it is completely clear, near invisible, and firmly glues all the fabric threads to the wood struts. Holds the fabric to the frame great, lots more long-term stable than mere stapling would do.

That adhesive is also great for repairing holes or tears in the fabric, near invisible repair after it dries. The last 18" X 18" X 72" absorber I made, was to use up all my leftover materials, left-over rockwool, left-over pink fluffy, left-over burlap scraps. I sized the absorber to use up all my left over materials as good as possible.

Anyway, it was covered with one foot or two foot wide little scraps of burlap remnants from all the other previous absorbers. I would staple each little scrap of burlap on the struts, then use a curved "tent needle" to sew the overlapped fabric edges together, then run a bead of Power Grab rubbed into the seam, to firmly glue the pieces of fabric to each other. I was expecting it to have a "son of Frankenstein" appearance, but doesn't look all that bad actually.

Just saying, the Power Grab adhesive plus a bit of sewing might make a good way of "skinning" those 705 shelled absorbers.
Old 21st May 2015
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcjr View Post
Very interesting idea. I imagine that the fabric wrap would make fairly significant contribution to the finished strength. As you say, maybe not strong enough to survive lots of banging around, but pretty strong for stationary long term use.

A possibly complimentary adhesive use-- When I was making light-wood-framed, burlap-skinned absorbers-- There is a caulk-gun adhesive Loktite Power Grab clear. A Power Grab for interior use, and a Power Grab Plus for exterior use which costs about a dollar more. I usually used the Power Grab Plus "just because" though for interior use perhaps either would be equivalent.

I am confident that something like your PL Premium would glue the 705 pieces together best.

But the Power Grab applies white then dries completely clear and non-staining. It seems about equivalent in use to aliphatic wood glue, though most good wood glues do not dry completely clear.

I would staple burlap to my frames, then run a bead of Power Grab on-top of the fabric over each wood strut, and rub it in with a finger, so the glue soaks thru the fabric and covers the underlying wood. After a few hours drying, it is completely clear, near invisible, and firmly glues all the fabric threads to the wood struts. Holds the fabric to the frame great, lots more long-term stable than mere stapling would do.

That adhesive is also great for repairing holes or tears in the fabric, near invisible repair after it dries. The last 18" X 18" X 72" absorber I made, was to use up all my leftover materials, left-over rockwool, left-over pink fluffy, left-over burlap scraps. I sized the absorber to use up all my left over materials as good as possible.

Anyway, it was covered with one foot or two foot wide little scraps of burlap remnants from all the other previous absorbers. I would staple each little scrap of burlap on the struts, then use a curved "tent needle" to sew the overlapped fabric edges together, then run a bead of Power Grab rubbed into the seam, to firmly glue the pieces of fabric to each other. I was expecting it to have a "son of Frankenstein" appearance, but doesn't look all that bad actually.

Just saying, the Power Grab adhesive plus a bit of sewing might make a good way of "skinning" those 705 shelled absorbers.
Awesome, thanks. I'll try it. I'll see if we have it here in Canada.

Quote:
I imagine that the fabric wrap would make fairly significant contribution to the finished strength.
Absolutely. These are very strong all things considered.

Last edited by Corey Milner; 21st May 2015 at 12:35 AM..
Old 28th July 2018
  #18
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey Milner View Post
Made these 18" x 18" x 47" blocks from OC705 filled with Roxul, capped and wrapped. Thought I would post photos in case they are helpful to anyone here building their own. Cheers.
Do you have any before/after measurements ?

TIA
Old 7th November 2019
  #19
Here for the gear
 

Bumping this thread in hopes of some opinions and/or experiences on this clever design! I have read repeated recommendations of using a single layer of rigid fiberglass at the face of deep bass traps, and then backfilling with pink fluffy. Since the soffit design technically has 2 faces, this fits the bill and avoids additional frame material simultaneously. Again very clever!
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