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DAW for stupid people?? Audacity on steroids??
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

DAW for stupid people?? Audacity on steroids??

Hey guys!!

I've written a ton of material and am going to attempt to record it myself. I am really bad at using DAWS. Like, really bad...

I've been using Audacity as basically a sketch pad and would continue to use it for finals, but IT CAN'T MULTITRACK!!! The most awesome features of Audacity are the Tempo Adjustment and the Click Track. Sooo easy...

I downloaded REASON, but that doesn't have a click feature like Audacity. It has something called a metronome, which doesn't make itself into an individual track and is difficult to use...

I've been working in protools at a friends house and that is actually much more like Audacity. They have a light version, but $30 a month and i think it might be too much for my needs.

What is the most bonehead easy program that will print visible click tracks that has a simple tempo adjustment feature and can multitrack? Think of a digital tape machine with wheels...

Sorry for the post guys. It hurt me more than it hurt you...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Here for the gear
 

Truly stupid people should record with their phone and avoid a DAW altogether.

I used PT about 10 years ago but when I migrated to MacBook Pro I chose Logic Pro instead. Even Garageband is completely capable of tracking your next platinum recording if you have the skillz. Every DAW these days has a significant learning curve so choose one that is a good match to your current hardware and learn to use it well.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Hm... I think you may find that metronomes in fact do exactly what you want from a click track. Then again, I wasn't aware that Audacity has such a thing, so I don't know what wonders it is capable of working.

Also, if ProTools seems more approachable to you than Reason, what is hurting you is not 'being bad with DAWs'. But let's work from that assumption.

One well-known (think: community support) software solution for budget-restricted DAW phobics that yet is still a DAW is Tracktion's T7. You might want to check first if that one alienates you less than the others.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Head
 

Pro Tools | First is what you want, if you want something free that works like Pro Tools. The full version of Pro Tools is $600 for a perpetual license or the $29/month "rental."

Pro Tools | First has a lot of restrictions, but if 16 tracks seems like enough and you don't need to use any 3rd-party plugins (which, you sure aren't with Audacity!) then it might be the ticket.

Bonus: You can pester your friend with all your questions!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Head
 

Reaper is $60 and is pretty capable.

https://forum.cockos.com/forumdisplay.php?f=20

Boom Recorder is a little more expensive but is rock solid and very capable.

https://www.pokitec.com/products/BoomRecorder/

Or Waves Tracks Live

https://www.waves.com/mixers-racks/t...ng-tracks-live
Old 4 weeks ago
  #6
Gear Head
 

Hey! Ya know what?? It turns out AUDACITY CAN MULTITRACK! I just figured out how to do it and recorded two mics simultaneously! My interface only has two inputs, but I think if I got one with more inputs that Audacity would recognize those as well. Now, onto the next question:

Is there any reason I SHOULDN'T use Audacity to capture my sound??

I'm hearing all these things about "bit rate" audio "conversion" and all this other stuff. My ONLY GOAL is to capture the sound (and to be able to import other people's tracks so I can play over them). I have other people who i will then send the tracks to for mixing etc...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #7
Here for the gear
 

Yes, a brick is an effective means to open a window, kind of. I would not rate Audacity a DAW... but I'd have to think a bit if you'd ask me why :-)

If you're happy with what Audacity does, then no, there is no reason to go elsewhere. If the people who process your recordings find issues with them, they will probably let you know.

Depending on your technical and artistic ambitions, however, you may find other tools more inviting to spend 80% more effort on inching 20% closer to perfection. Punching (which Audacity seems to do) and comping (which it doesn't) seem potentially relevant to you.

These Reaper videos by Kenny Gioia might give you an idea of the potential and the learning curve. If not inspire you.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePhonk View Post
and comping (which it doesn't) seem potentially relevant to you.
What exactly are you referring to when you say "comping"? My understanding of comping is taking multiple parts, sometimes from multiple tracks and putting them together to make one seamless part. Yeah, i agree. Audacity is probably not the first tool i would use to acheive that goal -At least I wouldn't currently know how to do that with it. That would be less necessary for me then punching, but honestly, it would be nice to be able to do that...

Good point...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post
What exactly are you referring to when you say "comping"? My understanding of comping is taking multiple parts, sometimes from multiple tracks and putting them together to make one seamless part.
What you describe is what I'm referrring to.

Since you ask for exactness, depending on your tool "tracks" may be called "lanes" or "takes" or... isn't there a DAW that has "revolver tracks"? (The terms "folder" and "playlist" are somewhat related.) Either way, it is about picking the most useful bits from multiple recordings of multiple renditions of typically one and the same sound (typically of musical instrument or voice) that ideally would all sound the same and equally good, but actually don't. Because of this general similarity, the resulting comp can be described this way: for every point in time, the comp contains the sound from the same point in time from exactly one of the recordings. That is not true for e.g. an audio montage.

In practical terms: you seem to play an instrument or sing, and want to record that. You're probably no perfect player / singer... or are perfect, but like to vary aspects of your rendigion. Thus you want to play / sing and record bits of music multiple times, to have at least one convincing recording of every bit (or sub-bit within the bit).

A decent DAW then will greatly out-reward your learning curve by letting you record the bit over and over (with metronome and punching and pre-roll and whatnot), cut the bit into the proper sub-bits and reassemble them with minimal effort. Maybe some audio editors like Audacity do that too, to some extent; I never checked Audacity in particular for its capabilities in that regard.

The (variance of) meaning of "comping" and its application have also been discussed in these two threads.

[Edit] PS: Regarding a 'printed' click track, I just learned that Studio One (a DAW) has a "Render" button in its metronome setup that creates just that. I understand Studio One has a free version, but can't tell right away if it has that very feature enabled.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #10
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePhonk View Post
What you describe is what I'm referrring to.

Since you ask for exactness, depending on your tool "tracks" may be called "lanes" or "takes" or... isn't there a DAW that has "revolver tracks"? (The terms "folder" and "playlist" are somewhat related.) Either way, it is about picking the most useful bits from multiple recordings of multiple renditions of typically one and the same sound (typically of musical instrument or voice) that ideally would all sound the same and equally good, but actually don't. Because of this general similarity, the resulting comp can be described this way: for every point in time, the comp contains the sound from the same point in time from exactly one of the recordings. That is not true for e.g. an audio montage.

In practical terms: you seem to play an instrument or sing, and want to record that. You're probably no perfect player / singer... or are perfect, but like to vary aspects of your rendigion. Thus you want to play / sing and record bits of music multiple times, to have at least one convincing recording of every bit (or sub-bit within the bit).

A decent DAW then will greatly out-reward your learning curve by letting you record the bit over and over (with metronome and punching and pre-roll and whatnot), cut the bit into the proper sub-bits and reassemble them with minimal effort. Maybe some audio editors like Audacity do that too, to some extent; I never checked Audacity in particular for its capabilities in that regard.

The (variance of) meaning of "comping" and its application have also been discussed in these two threads.

[Edit] PS: Regarding a 'printed' click track, I just learned that Studio One (a DAW) has a "Render" button in its metronome setup that creates just that. I understand Studio One has a free version, but can't tell right away if it has that very feature enabled.
Well, I'll just say that your post just about kicked my ass and i will probably have to read it ten more times and do several internet searches before i actually know what your talking about. Thank you, though! Seriously -It all seems very necessary and relevant for me at this stage in the game...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #11
Lives for gear
 
s wave's Avatar
Get Reaper NATIVE LINUX it is free - awesome small community - noobs get treated incredibly. (It has the separate click track - metronome - and you can change sound or use your own sound) Just use it as a multi track DAW to render your Audacity tracks till you get a little more comfortable. Or you can just open Reaper then open 'AUDACITY' in the 'external editor' SO essentially you are just using Audacity and you tracks are automatically copied and transferred to REAPER. I still use Audacity in this capacity - so nice....

Or take a look at ARDOUR probably the simplest straight forward DAW around (free too)... or down load a live boot OS (from flash - thumbdrive) like 'Federa Jam' Many audio programs pre-loaded ez to use... this is free also gl
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by cajundaddy View Post
Every DAW these days has a significant learning curve
Not really.

Check Mixcraft. Fully capable DAW and easy to get up to speed on, in fact that's why I chose it. Free trial version and only about $60 for the standard version (they have a "pro" one which includes Melodyne for I think about $90).

Reason would be my second choice for similar reasons.

Pro Tools would be dead last. One of the most laughably overpriced, user-unfriendly pile of crap software apps I've ever used.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
If I need a click track in Reason I use a drum machine.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
Here for the gear
I have somewhere about ability 5 in Ableton Live 10. On a scale of 1-10. I use Audacity all the time. It multitracks and has a lot of great features. I don't feel at a loss when using it, collaboration is a different story though. I do know quite a few pros who admit to using Garageband and Audacity.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post
What is the most bonehead easy program that will print visible click tracks that has a simple tempo adjustment feature and can multitrack? Think of a digital tape machine with wheels...
Studio One
Old 4 weeks ago
  #16
Here for the gear
 
PMTSTudio's Avatar
easy to afford daws

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post
Hey guys!!

I've written a ton of material and am going to attempt to record it myself. I am really bad at using DAWS. Like, really bad...

I've been using Audacity as basically a sketch pad and would continue to use it for finals, but IT CAN'T MULTITRACK!!! The most awesome features of Audacity are the Tempo Adjustment and the Click Track. Sooo easy...

I downloaded REASON, but that doesn't have a click feature like Audacity. It has something called a metronome, which doesn't make itself into an individual track and is difficult to use...

I've been working in protools at a friends house and that is actually much more like Audacity. They have a light version, but $30 a month and i think it might be too much for my needs.

What is the most bonehead easy program that will print visible click tracks that has a simple tempo adjustment feature and can multitrack? Think of a digital tape machine with wheels...

Sorry for the post guys. It hurt me more than it hurt you...

Reaper ,Harrison mix buss,both under 100$ both multitrack capable
Old 4 weeks ago
  #17
Gear Head
 

+1 for mixcraft
The simplicity and features are just awesome for the pricepoint.

Also Mulab from Mutools is great for what it delivers.

If you have some kind of mackie controller, the implementation in Mixcraft is just awesome.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #18
Here for the gear
 

Logic/GarageBand

I use GarageBand because I worked for 19 years with 11-year olds. The learning curve is so steep it almost does not exist. A kid gets a 20 minute navigation tour and "BANG!" she's making her own music. The ONLY drawback is you need a Mac. Since a used iMac can go from $100 to $500 and a new one or laptop anywhere from $1000 to stupid expensive I think you should consider them. I can run GarageBand on a 6 year old macbook Air. I can keep it simple or just go super deep into edits and effects.

WRNING: The click is not a track! You turn the metronome (clicker) on and off as needed from the tempo change box right at the top of the screen.

HOWEVER I can make a "click track" whenever I want simply by drag n drop copying a minimal drum loop and then extending it infinity times. voila! instant click track.

If you upgrade and actually pay for Logic Pro X, it looks exactly like GarageBand until you switch on the advanced features as needed. That is because GarageBand is simply a cut-rate version of Logic. For years and years I have used these 2 DAWs because I am more of a musician than an engineer and I simply don't want to study a manual for 2 days just to get started (ProTools and the older Logic Pro 9) I like the intuitive dive-right-in GUI.

Call me ________ but it works. You will get great tracks after a few tries. You will still need a good engineer to master your final product. Nothing about compression is intuitive until you have been at it a while. Artful EQ and pan staging takes experience. I leave that to the pros you meet here on gearslutz.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post
I've been working in protools at a friends house and that is actually much more like Audacity. They have a light version, but $30 a month and i think it might be too much for my needs.
You answer is here. Pay your buddy the thirty dollars a session to help you record. If he knows anything about how to use pro tools you can get what you want. If you are not comfortable letting him listen to you work you may have performance issues. It happens. Other than that - garageband is a good starting point if you have a mac. Plus it's always a good idea in a forum like this to tell folks what computer you are using - operating system, hard drive capacity, Ram etc. responders will have a better idea of what you can use

If you ever get to the point where you can scrape some dough together, a musician friendly DAW is Motu's Digital performer. Ignore all the midi stuff and just use it to record and overdub audio. The user interface is very musician friendly. The mixer looks like a mixing board.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #20
Thumbs up Sound ideas and what to do with them?

Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post
Hey! Ya know what?? It turns out AUDACITY CAN MULTITRACK! Now, onto the next question:
Is there any reason I SHOULDN'T use Audacity to capture my sound??
My ONLY GOAL is to capture the sound (and to be able to import other people's tracks so I can play over them). I have other people who i will then send the tracks to for mixing etc...
Audacity is much higher fidelity than Ableton Live. I prefer it for the better sound. And any multi-track recorder in you computer will allow you to capture sound. The sound of Audacity is a cut above some of the cheaper DAWs as well I am sure.Audacity is limited, but it is the tons of features that can bog down recording in DAWs.

With Audacity you have killer fidelity, multi-tracking, cut and paste, effects of your choice to plugin, recording one track while listening to another, play and save all formats (MP3 to AIFF), and
you know how to use it and more importantly you find it friendly so you can be comfortable in your studio. Get something else when you have a "real" need.

I use an Atari sequencer program from the late 1980's, Audacity, AULab, and Live9. My main recorder though is in the Atari 1040STE. For audio Audacity is great.

We are talking about composition here first and then recording your works.
How are you at composing?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #21
Lives for gear
 
s wave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quipu View Post
Audacity is much higher fidelity than Ableton Live. I prefer it for the better sound. And any multi-track recorder in you computer will allow you to capture sound. The sound of Audacity is a cut above some of the cheaper DAWs as well I am sure.Audacity is limited, but it is the tons of features that can bog down recording in DAWs.

With Audacity you have killer fidelity, multi-tracking, cut and paste, effects of your choice to plugin, recording one track while listening to another, play and save all formats (MP3 to AIFF), and
you know how to use it and more importantly you find it friendly so you can be comfortable in your studio. Get something else when you have a "real" need.

I use an Atari sequencer program from the late 1980's, Audacity, AULab, and Live9. My main recorder though is in the Atari 1040STE. For audio Audacity is great.

We are talking about composition here first and then recording your works.
How are you at composing?
Some good stuff in here. - I use audacity as my primary extermal editor in Reaper Native Linux. One HUGE over looked element here is: I can change an AIFF file to ,wav by just changing the suffix... (and vice versa etc) can other DAWS do this seamlessly? Not like Audacity... the ability to use project rate 384,000 hz sampling can not be overlooked here (I think this is what he is saying its higher fidelity)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #22
Gear Addict
Buy a digital multitracker such as a Zoom R8, R16 or R24 (depending on how many channels you need), the recordings can then be transferred to your mate's PT rig for mixing. These simple multitrackers are no harder to use than old fashioned cassette portastudios.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #23
Lives for gear
 

I do most of my recording with Bremmer's MultitrackStudio, then edit with Audacity. There's even a free Lite version of MultitrackStudio you can download.
If you have a PC, there's another simple free DAW, called Kristal Audio Engine.
Chris
Old 4 weeks ago
  #24
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s wave's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
I do most of my recording with Bremmer's MultitrackStudio, then edit with Audacity. There's even a free Lite version of MultitrackStudio you can download.
If you have a PC, there's another simple free DAW, called Kristal Audio Engine.
Chris
Ya Audacity is underrated - hey Chris did you know that Frank Zappa is President of Uzupis?
It is an imaginary country within the city of Vilnius Lithuania. He replaced Lenin... https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2...n/29/lithuania this is where i get my strange blood from... luv it!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #25
Lives for gear
 

My hippie babysitter around early 1965 through late 66, used to take me to the Laurel Canyon parties. Met & had a big crush on Michelle Phillips, and sang along with Mama Cass (they both thought I was cute-around 6 years old). Met lots of other Canyon notables that way. Lowell George when he was thin. Chris
Old 4 weeks ago
  #26
Mixbus

Forgot to mention: Mixbus is the best sounding DAW that inexpensive. Can do midi sequencing and audio recording. I use it to upgrade the sound from my work with Ableton Live and also for re-mastering some of my earlier work.

Simple or as complex as you want. I add a few Fab Filters to the stereo mix that I load in and just play it back to record with ultra high end hardware converters and so on to a digital SD deck.

Handy to have Live9, Mixbus, Audacity and my faithful Atari Notator software.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #27
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quipu View Post
We are talking about composition here first and then recording your works.
How are you at composing?
Composition -if you mean songwriting -is all I do! I have a ZOOM H4N that I use as a "scratch pad -Just to capture sounds and ideas. Once I've written a song on that, I then lay out a click track in audacity and record it again through my Roland Quad Capture. THEN, I go to a studio -Only now I'm looking to see if I can bypass the whole "going to a studio" part... I've got nice mics and I know how to use them pretty well... I'm just always in question whether or not I'm getting as good of a recorded sound as possible, but I'm finally getting to the point where I've spent enough time in studios that I know how my recorded sounds ranks. I think if I get a nice API lunch box or something I'll be set. I don't give a **** about room acoustics really -I'll just record in the garage... haha!

I'm super comfortable with Audacity. I've always wondered why it gets such a bad rap...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #28
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post
I don't give a **** about room acoustics really -I'll just record in the garage... haha!
Then be prepared for your recordings to sound like crap.

Quote:
I'm super comfortable with Audacity. I've always wondered why it gets such a bad rap...
It's not "bad" at all, just somewhat limited compared to full-up DAWs. But if your needs are basic, it can do the trick or at the very least give you that scratchpad to do rough demos.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #29
Lives for gear
 
s wave's Avatar
I am a fan of the 'garage sound' It takes soo much tweaking... but when you get it sounding right I love it. The amount of cardboard and concrete and plastic and assorted meta metals are awesome...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #30
Gear Nut
 
PascalC's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by T.M.A. View Post

I've been working in protools at a friends house and that is actually much more like Audacity.

Quote:
Audacity is much higher fidelity than Ableton Live
.
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