The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Why is Pro Tools industry standard
Old 18th October 2018
  #31
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Not really. He’s saying it can’t really be considered the industry standard; I’m saying for the industry he’s talking about, it never was.
He is not talking about the music industry then?

Quote:
xactly. I’m assuming he’s talking music
And you did it again... Music isn't limited to (traditional) band music. That is the whole point. We have to be more specific when discussing these topics because "the industry" encompasses so many different areas that do not necessarily use the same tools or techniques.

Alistair
Old 18th October 2018
  #32
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Indeed, my understanding is that Cubase has always been the worldwide biggest selling DAW. "Industry standard" has never meant the most popular.
Old 18th October 2018
  #33
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson View Post
Indeed, my understanding is that Cubase has always been the worldwide biggest selling DAW. "
I think that might have changed in recent years with the growth of popularity of Ableton, Logic and other daws but these things are hard to quantify without extensive market research as a lot of the number are not publicly available.

Alistair
Old 18th October 2018
  #34
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KorgAddict View Post
Well, the thread title asks about the "industry standard". How can you not assume the relation with recording studios? Because someone says he likes to compose with DAW X in his home studio has no influence on the "strength" of the industry standard.

KA
I’m looking at it in relation to published music (ie everything being officially released), not in relation to full service recording studios (a niche market). Seems the most sensible way to account for the industry standard, to look at how the output of the industry is being made at an given time.

Most of the music coming out in 2018 does not touch Protools. The music making world is easily navigable these days using your DAW of choice. The industry standard is currently "use whatever you want, and take the short step in any collabs to figure out the best way to work together."

@ ccmdav 's point in post 13 of this thread was that everyone but Protools users understands and respects this fact, that his beef with Protools is the assumptions of Protools users (which at this point have put them outside how everyone else in the industry now works, making them annoying to him). Which seems to be getting backed up by the responses in this thread.

Last edited by newguy1; 18th October 2018 at 04:37 PM..
Old 18th October 2018
  #35
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
I’m looking at it in relation to published music (ie everything being officially released), not in relation to full service recording studios (a niche market). Seems the most sensible way to account for the industry standard, to look at how the output of the industry is being made at an given time.

Most of the music coming out in 2018 does not touch Protools. The music making world is easily navigable these days using your DAW of choice. The industry standard is currently "use whatever you want, and take the short step in any collabs to figure out the best way to work together."

@ ccmdav 's point in post 13 of this thread was that everyone but Protools users understands and respects this fact, that his beef with Protools is the assumptions of Protools users (which at this point have put them outside how everyone else in the industry now works, making them annoying to him). Which seems to be getting backed up by the responses in this thread.
In 2018, any industry has a truck-load of used products. In the DAW market, there's at least 15 capable/popular DAWs so looking at it your way, there will never be any "industry standard".

Only thing I know is a couple of years ago I could have had a gig in the audio/TV/post world and they didn't ask me what DAW I was using. They asked me if I was fluent on Pro Tools...

KA
Old 18th October 2018
  #36
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KorgAddict View Post
In 2018, any industry has a truck-load of used products. In the DAW market, there's at least 15 capable/popular DAWs so looking at it your way, there will never be any "industry standard".
Yep:

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
We already live in a world of no industry standard.
The industry standard is now to ask the question "what DAW do you use" and find a way to make it work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KorgAddict View Post
Only thing I know is a couple of years ago I could have had a gig in the audio/TV/post world and they didn't ask me what DAW I was using. They asked me if I was fluent on Pro Tools...
On the service industry side of music making, there are all kinds of situations where you'd be hired for specific proficiencies of many kinds.

Any TV/video game gigs I've gotten have come because they want my sound, so I've used whatever I want, they're hiring me because they want my end product to sound like my other stuff. When I've brought in someone for help on projects (I've done this a couple of times), I need them proficient in Logic. If I were to hit up a fellow artist who's known sound could help the project out, I'd be bringing him in to do what he does, so he'd use whatever he was best at and we'd find a way to make it work.
Old 18th October 2018
  #37
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by KorgAddict View Post
In 2018, any industry has a truck-load of used products. In the DAW market, there's at least 15 capable/popular DAWs so looking at it your way, there will never be any "industry standard".
There are defacto standards in certain parts of the industry, yes, but not for the industry as a whole.

Quote:
Only thing I know is a couple of years ago I could have had a gig in the audio/TV/post world and they didn't ask me what DAW I was using. They asked me if I was fluent on Pro Tools...

KA
In broadcast and film post production PT is definitely the defacto standard at the moment. That could change depending on what Black Magic do with Resolve but at the moment PT is indeed still the go to in that field.

Alistair

Last edited by UnderTow; 18th October 2018 at 05:53 PM..
Old 18th October 2018
  #38
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow View Post
You pretty much demonstrated newguy1's point. No mention was made in the OP of recording studios yet you made that assumption. (The OP actually mentions composing, not a recording studios).

Alistair
Posts like psycho_monkey's are the ones that answer the OP's question. The OP is one of the many many many people that hears the words "industry standard" bandied about, and does not get which "industry" is being referred to. If he thinks that the "industry" is the sum total of all the DAWs, 2-input interfaces and SM7s being sold to every person making tracks for Soundcloud, then of course there is no "standard".

But that is clearly not what is meant by the term. I think the term "industry" automatically suggests a lot of things, but as one example, studios that record more than one person. Is a guy who works on his own car in his garage part of the "automobile industry"? Well, he buys tools and parts.... But if someone like the OP's confusion is based on this assumption, I think what psycho_monkey is saying provides a necessary disambiguation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1
The industry standard is now to ask the question "what DAW do you use" and find a way to make it work.
Hand on my heart, no one ever asks me this question. And I never ask them this question. I have a few clients who use Logic at home, and having been around the block, they already know to bring in wavs as a one way trip. . When they are done with the Logic part, it goes to PT and stays there.

I have never sent wavs back to Logic is what I am saying. What a kludge that would be. Time is money.
Old 18th October 2018
  #39
Gear Guru
 
UnderTow's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
Posts like psycho_monkey's are the ones that answer the OP's question. The OP is one of the many many many people that hears the words "industry standard" bandied about, and does not get which "industry" is being referred to. If he thinks that the "industry" is the sum total of all the DAWs, 2-input interfaces and SM7s being sold to every person making tracks for Soundcloud, then of course there is no "standard".

But that is clearly not what is meant by the term. I think the term "industry" automatically suggests a lot of things, but as one example, studios that record more than one person.
You are looking at it as someone that is part of that part of the "industry". newguy1 and me are talking about published music in general. Not stuff that is just released on SoundCloud. You show the exact bias that we are talking about assuming that anything outside your niche is just stuff released on SoundCloud. That is absolutely wrong. The vast majority of electronic music for instance doesn't get mixed on PT yet that doesn't mean it isn't professional music being released professionally on professional labels.

Quote:
Is a guy who works on his own car in his garage part of the "automobile industry"? Well, he buys tools and parts.... But if someone like the OP's confusion is based on this assumption, I think what psycho_monkey is saying provides a necessary disambiguation.
Again that bias. We are not talking about hobbyists tinkering on their own stuff that never gets released (outside of SoundCloud).

Quote:
Hand on my heart, no one ever asks me this question. And I never ask them this question.
That is because you are in the niche that works a certain way. The vast majority of the gigging professional musicians I know don't send their stuff to studios for hire using PT so you will never see that part of the market. That is the point we are making. The point is that without clarification of what we are talking about, we can't talk about any standard at all.

Alistair
Old 18th October 2018
  #40
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow View Post
You are looking at it as someone that is part of that part of the "industry". newguy1 and me are talking about published music in general. Not stuff that is just released on SoundCloud. You show the exact bias that we are talking about assuming that anything outside your niche is just stuff released on SoundCloud. That is absolutely wrong. The vast majority of electronic music for instance doesn't get mixed on PT yet that doesn't mean it isn't professional music being released professionally on professional labels.



Again that bias. We are not talking about hobbyists tinkering on their own stuff that never gets released (outside of SoundCloud).



That is because you are in the niche that works a certain way. The vast majority of the gigging professional musicians I know don't send their stuff to studios for hire using PT so you will never see that part of the market. That is the point we are making. The point is that without clarification of what we are talking about, we can't talk about any standard at all.

Alistair
Correct. I’m observing the way that money-making published music is made on the full scope of reputable labels (“DAWs sold at GC” is a straw man). And it’s the Wild West when it comes to DAW.

Best advice is to learn what DAW suits you best, unless you’re zooming in on being a service participant of a certain niche. If you’ve never encountered a “what DAW are you using” discussion, you’re working within a niche.
Old 19th October 2018
  #41
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow View Post
To me the industry is the entire industry, not just traditional band music (unless it is specified of course). So no, we should not assume it relates to recording studios especially as the OP mentioned composing rather than recording.

Alistair
Well, define it how you like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTow View Post
He is not talking about the music industry then?



And you did it again... Music isn't limited to (traditional) band music. That is the whole point. We have to be more specific when discussing these topics because "the industry" encompasses so many different areas that do not necessarily use the same tools or techniques.

Alistair
Not really. The question is "why is PT the industry standard. I assumed he's talking the "recording industry" (someone self recording, producing, or working in a demo studio is NOT in the "recording industry" - they may be in "music" but they're not servicing the same clients any more than a private pilot with a Cessna is in the "airline industry", even if they are in "aviation").

So if you prefer, the answer is "PT is not and never has been the "industry standard" of the entire music creation industry. PT IS however still the standard of the "recording industry", as in of recording studios for commercial hire, because of" and then pick up on my point above.

If that makes you happier! I just assumed he was asking about the recording industry, because he was talking about the industry that had a standard.

Much as by your logic, 2" tape was never the "recording industry standard" because there's always been guys doing demos, local releases etc on 1/2" 8 track and so on. I bet there's been more cassette Portastudios sold than 2" machines, does that make the cassette the "music industry standard"?

This is all points scoring really though. You know I'm not talking about music creators, but I've never claimed to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
I’m looking at it in relation to published music (ie everything being officially released), not in relation to full service recording studios (a niche market). Seems the most sensible way to account for the industry standard, to look at how the output of the industry is being made at an given time.
Sure, it's a niche industry more and more, but that's the industry referred to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Most of the music coming out in 2018 does not touch Protools. The music making world is easily navigable these days using your DAW of choice. The industry standard is currently "use whatever you want, and take the short step in any collabs to figure out the best way to work together."
Sure. The thing is - most of the music in the popular music field IS still being made with the input of engineering and mix professionals. I'm not just talking American Top 40 radio, I'm talking nationwide radio across the world. Look at the labels involved - the stuff being listened to and played is still mainly on majors, a few well set up indies big enough that once they'd have been considered majors - even the "alternative" stations. Ignore Serban and Manny for the moment, that's something that may well skew Top 40 radio but not everything else. Aside from a few exceptions (eg someone like Calvin Harris who is mainstream, self producing and probably self mixing, and even then any feature vocalist will almost certainly be tracked by others), much of the Beatport content and so on is itself a "niche" market. Just because it's being made, doesn't mean it's being listened to widely outside of hardcore fanbases! That sounds harsh, but many of these producers will not be making anything like a living from it, any more than the demo recordist with a portastudio - it's just easier to distribute now.



Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Yep:



The industry standard is now to ask the question "what DAW do you use" and find a way to make it work.



On the service industry side of music making, there are all kinds of situations where you'd be hired for specific proficiencies of many kinds.

Any TV/video game gigs I've gotten have come because they want my sound, so I've used whatever I want, they're hiring me because they want my end product to sound like my other stuff. When I've brought in someone for help on projects (I've done this a couple of times), I need them proficient in Logic. If I were to hit up a fellow artist who's known sound could help the project out, I'd be bringing him in to do what he does, so he'd use whatever he was best at and we'd find a way to make it work.
Any composition gig has only and ever been about the sound - that's nothing new. And sure - if you need engineering help, you're going to need them to work your way (I've lost precisely one gig because I've not been Logic fluent, in 15 or so years). But that's not really collaboration - that's employment. And again - not really what the OP's question was. PT or any other DAW for example has never been the "industry standard" in your industry. The closest thing that's an alternate standard at the moment is Live - for both live stem playback, and EDM composition. For standard composition work, I'd say it's possibly closer to a 3 way tie between Logic/Cubase/PT, depending on the roots and approach of the composer. What IS interesting is that I see more out and out writer/producers working solely in Pro Tools now, because the instrument support has caught up, when once they'd have been bouncing between Logic and PT, or staying solely in Logic. At one point visiting writers ONLY ever used Logic. When I've had big writer teams come in recently (Milk and Honey guys, Native Tongue, Mushroom) it's a mix - possibly even PT dominant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
If you’ve never encountered a “what DAW are you using” discussion, you’re working within a niche.
Sure - I'm working in the "niche" that is the recording industry, and encompasses most major label released projects, and a whole lot of indie funded stuff too. Sounds snobby, but what I don't work on is self recording electronic stuff, TV composition and so on.

When I get asked "what are you running" they mean version number, HD vs HDX and so on.

That's not to say I don't have people using other systems in the studio - that they bring with them, and I plumb in to our monitoring/tracking chain.
Old 19th October 2018
  #42
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Sure, it's a niche industry more and more, but that's the industry referred to.
He didn't specify what he meant, who knows what industry he referred to.

The facts are: Its not the dominant DAW when it comes to published music being released, there's no standard there, there's multiple DAWs that get high use with no standout. Its still the standard in full service studios.

Simple as that really.
Old 19th October 2018
  #43
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
He didn't specify what he meant, who knows what industry he referred to.

The facts are: Its not the dominant DAW when it comes to published music being released, there's no standard there, there's multiple DAWs that get high use with no standout. Its still the standard in full service studios.

Simple as that really.
Like I said...original question is “why is PT industry standard?”.

It’s fair enough to assume one is asking about the industry it has been a standard of.

Otherwise the whole thread makes no sense. Those of us answering “why” are simply answering the question asked, rather than questioning the question.
Old 19th October 2018
  #44
Seems like a lot of personal agendas going on.
I think I have a foot in old school and modern tech.

There are many reasons to know Pro Tools other than so called 'old school bands and recording studios'.

I have a career in virtual instrument software and everyone my partner and I collaborate with use Pro Tools by default.
A lot of modern electronic music still uses elements of real drums, or acoustic drum samples. If you want to overdub some real drum parts on an electronica track in a nice sounding room, you'll be going into a studio that ONLY uses Pro Tools. ALL my acoustic drum samples and hybrid electronic/acoustic drum samples have been created in Pro Tools.
I know electronic producers who create tracks in Ableton or Logic and mix/deliver in Pro Tools.
Film and TV is still heavily weighted towards Pro Tools. My experience in music software has been heavily weighted towards Pro Tools. Painting Pro Tools as last century bands and studios tech is just ridiculous.

Right now I mostly use Ableton Live for my own music, but still use Pro Tools in plenty of other instances.
I actually think most professionals know at least two DAWs pretty well.
If you want to collaborate with a wider variety of musicians across the globe, or you want to use an established recording studio (to record drums, or just a vocal, or send out for a mix) it's more likely than not Pro Tools will be the DAW.

I'm saying it has become the common denominator worldwide when it comes to collaboration.
Collaboration is - working with other musicians, working with film makers, working with music software developers, working with mixers.
Limiting your collaboration to other people who use the same DAW, like Ableton Live, or Cubase, is just that - limiting.
Old 19th October 2018
  #45
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Its still the standard in full service studios.
Full service studios still touch a lot of projects.
I worked on a new technology product for Roland last year. We used Pro Tools in a typical recording studio, and then at home.
Old 19th October 2018
  #46
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Like I said...original question is “why is PT industry standard?”.

It’s fair enough to assume one is asking about the industry it has been a standard of.

Otherwise the whole thread makes no sense. Those of us answering “why” are simply answering the question asked, rather than questioning the question.
You should let it go man. These people will interpret your comment just to justify their points. When we're at the point where they say that we should wonder about what industry the OP was reffering to... I mean, really?

And as usual the OP has left the building a long time ago...

KA
Old 19th October 2018
  #47
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
Collaboration is - working with other musicians, working with film makers, working with music software developers, working with mixers.
Limiting your collaboration to other people who use the same DAW, like Ableton Live, or Cubase, is just that - limiting.
You just bounce audio to work across DAW. One person takes it as far as he can on his end, bounces audio to kick to the collaborator, who takes things as far as he can on his end, and then sends back, repeat till everyone's happy with the track. When it goes back to a collaborator, any committed audio parts can be reworked in relation to what's been added, if necessary. Each takes care of their end on their side. Very common. Much like you kick to the guitarist or vocalist or guy with the outboard chain/outboard synths/modular setup for their unique parts, which can't be done on the other end and are committed to audio, you kick to the Ableton guy for his Ableton parts etc. If things need to be redone later, much like a guitarist or vocalist will re-cut, the guy using the other DAW will recut. The DAW becomes a kind of performance instrument in this way. With the best of the engineers involved doing the mixdown on his DAW of choice.

I'm in Logic, I've collab'd with two Ableton users and a FL user this year, and one other collab where I'm not even sure what the other guy used, that one was one-directional through a 3rd party and ended with me.
Old 19th October 2018
  #48
I get it. I’ve been doing it since music computers first came along. Bouncing audio, most of the time, is a huge pita. Recording a kit for a drum sample product, with 32 or more tracks, hundreds of individual clips for each stick articulation. It’s easy for something to get lost or moved.
My partner and I swap the sessions back and forth five or six times during the project.
Reality is, the studio has PT, my partner and I both have PT, the music software company has PT.
Say we had three different DAWs between us. Complete nightmare. For the sake of a few hundred pounds investment we’re all on the same page.
Sure, if someone is recording their vocal using Logic with some backing track stems bounced out of Ableton, that’s easier to manage.
Old 20th October 2018
  #49
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
You just bounce audio to work across DAW. One person takes it as far as he can on his end, bounces audio to kick to the collaborator, who takes things as far as he can on his end, and then sends back, repeat till everyone's happy with the track. When it goes back to a collaborator, any committed audio parts can be reworked in relation to what's been added, if necessary. Each takes care of their end on their side. Very common. Much like you kick to the guitarist or vocalist or guy with the outboard chain/outboard synths/modular setup for their unique parts, which can't be done on the other end and are committed to audio, you kick to the Ableton guy for his Ableton parts etc. If things need to be redone later, much like a guitarist or vocalist will re-cut, the guy using the other DAW will recut. The DAW becomes a kind of performance instrument in this way. With the best of the engineers involved doing the mixdown on his DAW of choice.

I'm in Logic, I've collab'd with two Ableton users and a FL user this year, and one other collab where I'm not even sure what the other guy used, that one was one-directional through a 3rd party and ended with me.
It does depend though. A lot of the time, if I’m tracking vocals for someone, they’ll send me a session with stems, markers etc in place. I’ll track the vocals, do comps and sometimes tuning etc - but I’ll send them back just the exported tracks, which then slot into their session. They can use my comps, or they can re-edit or tweak them.

Sure - I could consolidate everything and export it. Your way works, mine is much more elegant, flexible, clearer and quicker. Which is why it’s generally preferred (especially if there’s a lot of to and fro-ing).

But it’s not a barrier - frequently I track vocals that go back to a Live session or something, in which case consolidating is the only way. It also depends on the client - someone working in PT is likely to be more of an engineer who might want to tweak stuff; often the producers working in Live won’t want to be so hands on, in which case they’ll often only want the master comps. It varies but that’s not unusual.
Old 20th October 2018
  #50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
I get it. I’ve been doing it since music computers first came along. Bouncing audio, most of the time, is a huge pita. Recording a kit for a drum sample product, with 32 or more tracks, hundreds of individual clips for each stick articulation. It’s easy for something to get lost or moved.
My partner and I swap the sessions back and forth five or six times during the project.
Reality is, the studio has PT, my partner and I both have PT, the music software company has PT.
Say we had three different DAWs between us. Complete nightmare. For the sake of a few hundred pounds investment we’re all on the same page.
Sure, if someone is recording their vocal using Logic with some backing track stems bounced out of Ableton, that’s easier to manage.
Exactly. And this is all very different to when someone’s hired as a composer, and all they need to deliver is music. It’s a different industry (and again - one that has always been personal).
Old 20th October 2018
  #51
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Sure - I could consolidate everything and export it. Your way works, mine is much more elegant, flexible, clearer and quicker. Which is why it’s generally preferred (especially if there’s a lot of to and fro-ing).
Of course its more "elegant" when everyone uses the same thing. I can see how its necessary to standardize this for the service parts of the industry. And yes, for this branch of the industry Protools is standard.

Logic was the "industry standard" in my scenes for a good 15 years, always more "elegant etc" to work with a fellow Logic user (Ableton has surpassed it by a bit now though.)

I prefer artistic options to homogenized standardization though, especially when it comes to creative collaborations (not cutting vocals for someone, but you're both making a track together, equally participating in the creative process.) I'm not mad at Ableton users for using Ableton or calling the process less elegant, you just find the best way to make any collabs work with anyone who's artistry you value.

I see the OP as a noob (since that is his name) questioning whether he needs to learn and invest in Protools. Which is a common concern that I also had 15 years ago. In which case the most useful and practical answer is "it depends." Is his goal to fill a service role? Or is his goal to be a working creative known for a sound? If its the former, learn Protools 100%. If its the latter, choose whatever works best for you. If its some of both, learn Protools AND whatever you like. There's no sonic advantage of one DAW over another or things that only Protools can do (which was his question), DAW choice entirely down to what role in the industry one wants to fill.

This would be my only motive in this discussion, clarification for guys who remind me of myself 15 years ago wrestling with this same decision of whether or not it matters to learn Protools at all.
Old 20th October 2018
  #52
‘Artistic options’ are not impacted whichever DAW you choose. You do make some odd comments.
Old 20th October 2018
  #53
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
‘Artistic options’ are not impacted whichever DAW you choose. You do make some odd comments.
Some people love the feel of Ableton. Others love the feel of Logic. Others love the feel of FL. etc etc. The DAW of choice becomes something like an instrument of choice.

Just like some prefer the feel of analog synths to plugins, or a certain Les Paul guitar to another. Artists get inspired (and de-motivated) by all kinds of weird things. Options help people maximize things for themselves.

So I like having these options available, a "no industry standard, use whatever inspires you the most for whatever reasons" rather than one homogenized standard, when it comes to the creative side of the industry.

That clarify?
Old 20th October 2018
  #54
Lives for gear
 
Sharp11's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
‘Artistic options’ are not impacted whichever DAW you choose. You do make some odd comments.
And he makes a ton of assumptions.
Old 20th October 2018
  #55
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post

So I like having these options available, a "no industry standard, use whatever inspires you the most for whatever reasons" rather than one homogenized standard, when it comes to the creative side of the industry.
That clarify?
Stating Pro Tools is widely used in ALL areas of music and sound design forces no one to use it.
What an odd idea.
Use whatever inspires you.
That doesn’t change the fact 99.9% of commercial studios use Pro Tools. And the original point I was making is that people use commercial studios for more jobs than recording ‘traditional bands’.
Old 21st October 2018
  #56
Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
Of course its more "elegant" when everyone uses the same thing. I can see how its necessary to standardize this for the service parts of the industry. And yes, for this branch of the industry Protools is standard.

Logic was the "industry standard" in my scenes for a good 15 years, always more "elegant etc" to work with a fellow Logic user (Ableton has surpassed it by a bit now though.)

I prefer artistic options to homogenized standardization though, especially when it comes to creative collaborations (not cutting vocals for someone, but you're both making a track together, equally participating in the creative process.) I'm not mad at Ableton users for using Ableton or calling the process less elegant, you just find the best way to make any collabs work with anyone who's artistry you value.

I see the OP as a noob (since that is his name) questioning whether he needs to learn and invest in Protools. Which is a common concern that I also had 15 years ago. In which case the most useful and practical answer is "it depends." Is his goal to fill a service role? Or is his goal to be a working creative known for a sound? If its the former, learn Protools 100%. If its the latter, choose whatever works best for you. If its some of both, learn Protools AND whatever you like. There's no sonic advantage of one DAW over another or things that only Protools can do (which was his question), DAW choice entirely down to what role in the industry one wants to fill.

This would be my only motive in this discussion, clarification for guys who remind me of myself 15 years ago wrestling with this same decision of whether or not it matters to learn Protools at all.
It’s the difference between collaborating as a composer, and collaborating as an engineer really I feel. The technical nature of the latter means a common platform makes more sense.

I agree with the “do I need to learn it” approach above; the only thing I’d say is if you work in PT you can work both ways, if you don’t you can’t. If you have any intention of working for others it makes sense to know PT very well. But yes - it does depend.
Old 21st October 2018
  #57
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
Stating Pro Tools is widely used in ALL areas of music and sound design forces no one to use it.
What an odd idea.
Use whatever inspires you.
That doesn’t change the fact 99.9% of commercial studios use Pro Tools. And the original point I was making is that people use commercial studios for more jobs than recording ‘traditional bands’.
I don’t disagree with this straw man at all. No argument here.
Old 21st October 2018
  #58
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
It’s the difference between collaborating as a composer, and collaborating as an engineer really I feel. The technical nature of the latter means a common platform makes more sense.

I agree with the “do I need to learn it” approach above; the only thing I’d say is if you work in PT you can work both ways, if you don’t you can’t. If you have any intention of working for others it makes sense to know PT very well. But yes - it does depend.
Yep!
Old 21st October 2018
  #59
Lives for gear
 
s.d.finley's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
‘Artistic options’ are not impacted whichever DAW you choose. You do make some odd comments.
AND, even if we all were forced to use the same DAW, we all would not use that DAW the same way....
Old 21st October 2018
  #60
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
It’s the difference between collaborating as a composer, and collaborating as an engineer really I feel. The technical nature of the latter means a common platform makes more sense.
.
My point is that many people, arguably a majority, are doing both. These days you can’t afford to do one job. Many in the industry are a jack of all trades.
Playing an instrument, songwriting, making DIY solo records, teaching and vlogging, getting involved in new products and software.
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump