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Vintage DAW Museum :~)>
Old 20th April 2016
  #1
Vintage DAW Museum :~)>

OK so here it is, a Vintage Mastering DAW "Museum" Thread.

Feel free to post pics of your ancient DAW systems, preferably up and running!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waltz Mastering View Post
I have an early Sonic system and a Atari Mega ST & Mac with Sound Tools & Deck in storage.
Quick phone pic of some stuff I could find easily & part of a older mac/daw graveyard.
Pretty sure it all still works
Nice! How about a live action shot with everything connected, and running.

I've still got old SD2 systems running on a couple of G3's with AM3 cards, although they very rarely get used for anything, maybe 1-2 times per year for retrieving ancient projects from the 90s.

Also have the blue G4 which was one of the first Mac "super CPUs" with SD2, PT5, Waveburner 2 (emagic), and others.

I'll post pics soon, when time allows.

Best, JT
Old 20th April 2016
  #2
Ive used a 1040ste with cubase 3.0 and an amiga 2000 with protracker 2.5 for many years. But they're in my storage room i never use them anymore. Now i use logic pro x and renoise instead.
Of course they werent used for mastering. My first mastering rig was a PC/win95 with wavelab 1.5 and a 2x memorex scsi cd burner.
Old 20th April 2016
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Precision Studio View Post
Ive used a 1040ste with cubase 3.0 and an amiga 2000 with protracker 2.5 for many years. But they're in my storage room i never use them anymore. Now i use logic pro x and renoise instead.
Of course they werent used for mastering. My first mastering rig was a PC/win95 with wavelab 1.5 and a 2x memorex scsi cd burner.
Amiga, that was the premium Commodore PC correct?

So you've been with Wabelab for a looong time!

Pics please!

Best JT
Old 20th April 2016
  #4

Here's our original promo shot from 1990! Digidesign Sound Tools 1, Apple monochrome monitor, Yamaha NS-10M, Panasonic DAT, complete with Mullet!
Best, JT
Old 20th April 2016
  #5
Sorry i dont have any pics. And i cant shoot as the wares are stored. And about wavelab i stopped using it since v6 release.
Old 20th April 2016
  #6
I mean i stopped upgrading from v5 and continued using v5 3 years then starting doing mastering in logic that i use since v4.5
Old 20th April 2016
  #7
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Tubb View Post
Here's our original promo shot from 1990! Digidesign Sound Tools 1, Apple monochrome monitor, Yamaha NS-10M, Panasonic DAT, complete with Mullet!
Best, JT
wow! that sound tools 1 must've really seemed like The Future at the time huh? i didn't see a waveform on a screen till at least '97.
Old 21st April 2016
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Precision Studio View Post
Sorry i dont have any pics. And i cant shoot as the wares are stored. And about wavelab i stopped using it since v6 release.
Yeah pics were pretty rare as we didn't have smart phones or digital cameras yet, and we never thought to take any photos, as you had to get film developed and printed!

The promo pic was for our "grand" opening with this bleeding edge DAW technology. People we almost dumbfounded when they saw and heard it for the first time. It was an exciting era, the late 80s and early 90s, there were only a few mastering suites around the country. I remember working with Phish one day in 93 with this rig, when they were passing through Austin, although I had upgraded to Genelec S-30 monitors & Sound Tools II by then.

Bring on the pics, it's a nostalgic geeky fun thread, not just for those of us that lived through all the changes, but also for newbies to see the history of the developmental changes of the DAW.

Bonus points for any mullet shots!

Best, JT
Old 21st April 2016
  #9
Lives for gear
The motorola 68k was such a fun cpu. Amiga, Atari ST, early Macs, all 68K powered. I really liked programming asm on the 68k. In the later "speed wars" motorola just couldn't throw enough money at speeding-up 68k, compared with intel efforts, and eventually fell by the wayside. It just seemed more than a coincidence that the best early music/audio computers were 68k based.

Lightning took out the C64 and C128 6510 music computers. 6502, 6510 type 8 bit cpu's were also lots of fun to program.

Haven't tried to boot it for years, but unless it has gone bad sitting on the shelf-- I have a Mac classic toaster that worked last time it was booted. The classic was one generation before that final SE30 toaster, so far as I recall. The classic had maybe a 40 meg internal scsi drive.

The earlier 128K toaster is long gone. In order to be useful for music/programming, that 128 toaster had to be upgraded with a 2 meg memory daughterboard, which costed about $500. Ran it on an external scsi removable-cartridge floppy mass storage at 8 or 16 meg per cartridge, only cost about $800.

The C64 and those Mac toasters could only do MIDI. A heavily-tricked-out SE30 toaster could "barely" do a little audio. I would lock the toasters to tape with JL Cooper SMPTE sync box. Drive many MIDI synths along with tape.

Got a lot done on a mac 700 ci for several years. It had 68040 cpu, 24 meg memory. 40 or 80 MB internal drive. Maybe later on, a slightly bigger internal drive. And a stack of external SCSI slow hard drives, and a syquest external drive with lots of 40 MB removable carts for backup. Had replaced the JL Cooper sync box and earlier MIDI interfaces with a MOTU MTPII midi interface/sync box.

The last couple of years with the mac ci, it had a digidesign stereo audio card (analog and spdif), a 1 GB scsi hard drive that only costed $1000, and a Yamaha 4X external scsi CD burner that was about $1200. My first system that could do audio, though audio capability was very limited. Up to four tracks if you were lucky and the hardware/software happened to be in a good mood. Transferring mixes from DAT or PCM 501, it was possible to make pre-master CD's and I made quite a few!! But the 1 GB drive could only hold one CD project at a time, and after setting up a CD project and writing a few CD's for safety backup, had to erase the 1 GB drive to clear out enough room to begin each new CD project.

I had some of the early digi software, but at the time liked Opcode Studio Vision or MOTU Digital Performer better for audio. Digi software had no MIDI features at all, and so far as I could tell, the Opcode and MOTU software did better audio than the digi software of the time.

Replaced the ci as best can recall, with a Motorola "officially licensed" Mac clone tower that motu sold for a couple of years. I liked it better than what apple was selling at the time. Can't recall if the moto was 68K or PPC cpu. Used it with similar equipment listed above, added a MOTU 2408 8 channel analog audio interface, which also had 16 channels of digital i/o. Stopped using tape very much.

The motorola had a fancy-dancy smokin fast scsi controller card driving a pair of internal 4 GB Cheetah 10000 RPM scsi drives in a RAID 0 for audio storage, multitrack and such. Was real proud of such a "high performance audio machine". Those cheetahs ran hot as a firecracker. Had to mount multiple fans blowing on the cheetahs to keep em from melting down.

So then 1995 got my first Win95 PC, a "mid budget" pentium tower with 8 or 16 megs memory and a couple of internal "cheap" 40 GB WD caviar IDE 7200 RPM drives. Expensive by modern standards, but each 40 GB caviar a fraction of the cost of that first 1 GB scsi drive from a few years earlier.

Had just switched over from part-time music and part-time programming, to full-time music programming. One of the first tasks was a little utility to batch convert/merge/split a list of audio files. I first wrote the PC version, didn't work very hard on it, no optimization, and it ran surprisingly fast for that time. So then I wrote the Mac version and it was dramatically slower than the PC version. Spent awhile optimizing the Mac version with every trick I could think of. Never could get the Mac version to run even half as fast as the easy PC version. I was fairly knowledgable programming Mac and complete newbie programming PC.

It was hard to believe that the cheap Win95 tower with the 7200 RPM IDE drives, was smoking faster than my expensive RAID 0 of 10000 RPM cheetahs, putting the mac and cheetahs to shame. So I started getting more interested in the PC's.

One thing-- For multi-track audio recording, seek latency is important. So a system with low-latency seek might handle more tracks of audio than a system with faster sequential access but slower seeking behavior. So POSSIBLY the mac with the cheetah RAID would have been better on multi-track audio, but was disappointing anywy.

In that era IMO Digital Performer was more powerful than most of the PC sequencers, and DP was already bought and paid for, so I kept DP running on a Mac for dedicated multitrack and audio processing up into the 2000's. The last configuration probably still works, unless it went bad sitting on the shelf-- A blue G4 or G5 PPC tower loaded with the "fast" raid 0 drives. Can't recall if there were two mac towers after that MOTO clone mac tower, or only one.

I remember loading a dual PPC cpu upgrade module in one of them. Or maybe in two similar towers at different years. Time files when yer having fun. Its sitting in the old studio, possibly hasn't been booted since 2005 or earlier. That blue PPC tower, would run on OS 9 and also OS 10.1. With a third-party ADB card, was the last Mac I had which could use old ADB accessories such as midi interfaces and ADB mice/keyboards.

The last/current Mac tower is a 2009 or 2010 8 core xeon Mac Pro. Got good service out of it, still runs, but haven't used it much since retirement.
Old 22nd April 2016
  #10
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Tubb View Post

Here's our original promo shot from 1990! Digidesign Sound Tools 1, Apple monochrome monitor, Yamaha NS-10M, Panasonic DAT, complete with Mullet!
Best, JT
raw and unedited in every sense, love it!
Old 22nd April 2016
  #11
Great stuff JCJR, yes this rig was running on a Mac II ci w 68k processor.
I went up through nearly all the generations of Macs beginning w the 512k Fat Mac with much of what you described, including MIDI. Sound Designer ONE for sample editing back in the mid 80s, I still have the floppy :~)>

These days I'm Rockin' a couple of Mac Pro Towers w Intel.

Best, JT

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcjr View Post
The motorola 68k was such a fun cpu. Amiga, Atari ST, early Macs, all 68K powered. I really liked programming asm on the 68k. In the later "speed wars" motorola just couldn't throw enough money at speeding-up 68k, compared with intel efforts, and eventually fell by the wayside. It just seemed more than a coincidence that the best early music/audio computers were 68k based.

Lightning took out the C64 and C128 6510 music computers. 6502, 6510 type 8 bit cpu's were also lots of fun to program.

Haven't tried to boot it for years, but unless it has gone bad sitting on the shelf-- I have a Mac classic toaster that worked last time it was booted. The classic was one generation before that final SE30 toaster, so far as I recall. The classic had maybe a 40 meg internal scsi drive.

The earlier 128K toaster is long gone. In order to be useful for music/programming, that 128 toaster had to be upgraded with a 2 meg memory daughterboard, which costed about $500. Ran it on an external scsi removable-cartridge floppy mass storage at 8 or 16 meg per cartridge, only cost about $800.

The C64 and those Mac toasters could only do MIDI. A heavily-tricked-out SE30 toaster could "barely" do a little audio. I would lock the toasters to tape with JL Cooper SMPTE sync box. Drive many MIDI synths along with tape.

Got a lot done on a mac 700 ci for several years. It had 68040 cpu, 24 meg memory. 40 or 80 MB internal drive. Maybe later on, a slightly bigger internal drive. And a stack of external SCSI slow hard drives, and a syquest external drive with lots of 40 MB removable carts for backup. Had replaced the JL Cooper sync box and earlier MIDI interfaces with a MOTU MTPII midi interface/sync box.

The last couple of years with the mac ci, it had a digidesign stereo audio card (analog and spdif), a 1 GB scsi hard drive that only costed $1000, and a Yamaha 4X external scsi CD burner that was about $1200. My first system that could do audio, though audio capability was very limited. Up to four tracks if you were lucky and the hardware/software happened to be in a good mood. Transferring mixes from DAT or PCM 501, it was possible to make pre-master CD's and I made quite a few!! But the 1 GB drive could only hold one CD project at a time, and after setting up a CD project and writing a few CD's for safety backup, had to erase the 1 GB drive to clear out enough room to begin each new CD project.

I had some of the early digi software, but at the time liked Opcode Studio Vision or MOTU Digital Performer better for audio. Digi software had no MIDI features at all, and so far as I could tell, the Opcode and MOTU software did better audio than the digi software of the time.

Replaced the ci as best can recall, with a Motorola "officially licensed" Mac clone tower that motu sold for a couple of years. I liked it better than what apple was selling at the time. Can't recall if the moto was 68K or PPC cpu. Used it with similar equipment listed above, added a MOTU 2408 8 channel analog audio interface, which also had 16 channels of digital i/o. Stopped using tape very much.

The motorola had a fancy-dancy smokin fast scsi controller card driving a pair of internal 4 GB Cheetah 10000 RPM scsi drives in a RAID 0 for audio storage, multitrack and such. Was real proud of such a "high performance audio machine". Those cheetahs ran hot as a firecracker. Had to mount multiple fans blowing on the cheetahs to keep em from melting down.

So then 1995 got my first Win95 PC, a "mid budget" pentium tower with 8 or 16 megs memory and a couple of internal "cheap" 40 GB WD caviar IDE 7200 RPM drives. Expensive by modern standards, but each 40 GB caviar a fraction of the cost of that first 1 GB scsi drive from a few years earlier.

Had just switched over from part-time music and part-time programming, to full-time music programming. One of the first tasks was a little utility to batch convert/merge/split a list of audio files. I first wrote the PC version, didn't work very hard on it, no optimization, and it ran surprisingly fast for that time. So then I wrote the Mac version and it was dramatically slower than the PC version. Spent awhile optimizing the Mac version with every trick I could think of. Never could get the Mac version to run even half as fast as the easy PC version. I was fairly knowledgable programming Mac and complete newbie programming PC.

It was hard to believe that the cheap Win95 tower with the 7200 RPM IDE drives, was smoking faster than my expensive RAID 0 of 10000 RPM cheetahs, putting the mac and cheetahs to shame. So I started getting more interested in the PC's.

One thing-- For multi-track audio recording, seek latency is important. So a system with low-latency seek might handle more tracks of audio than a system with faster sequential access but slower seeking behavior. So POSSIBLY the mac with the cheetah RAID would have been better on multi-track audio, but was disappointing anywy.

In that era IMO Digital Performer was more powerful than most of the PC sequencers, and DP was already bought and paid for, so I kept DP running on a Mac for dedicated multitrack and audio processing up into the 2000's. The last configuration probably still works, unless it went bad sitting on the shelf-- A blue G4 or G5 PPC tower loaded with the "fast" raid 0 drives. Can't recall if there were two mac towers after that MOTO clone mac tower, or only one.

I remember loading a dual PPC cpu upgrade module in one of them. Or maybe in two similar towers at different years. Time files when yer having fun. Its sitting in the old studio, possibly hasn't been booted since 2005 or earlier. That blue PPC tower, would run on OS 9 and also OS 10.1. With a third-party ADB card, was the last Mac I had which could use old ADB accessories such as midi interfaces and ADB mice/keyboards.

The last/current Mac tower is a 2009 or 2010 8 core xeon Mac Pro. Got good service out of it, still runs, but haven't used it much since retirement.
Old 23rd April 2016
  #12
Lives for gear
 
dcollins's Avatar
https://www.facebook.com/stephen.bar...1765694863958/

Video includes:

1. Early Sonic Solutions Workstation.
2. Mullets
3. Software Bugs


DC
Old 23rd April 2016
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcollins View Post
https://www.facebook.com/stephen.bar...1765694863958/

Video includes:

1. Early Sonic Solutions Workstation.
2. Mullets
3. Software Bugs


DC
Perfect Dave!

What year, late 80s? Edit (oh yes, I see it's 1988!)

Super-mullets in their full glory!

Our friend Gregg Rolie singing a rock classic!

Best, JT

p.s. I think eventually the pony tails of today will fade away and mullets will be reborn!

Last edited by Jerry Tubb; 23rd April 2016 at 01:45 PM..
Old 23rd April 2016
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by scraggs View Post
wow! that sound tools 1 must've really seemed like The Future at the time huh? i didn't see a waveform on a screen till at least '97.
It was definitely on the bleeding edge, and full of bugs!

There were only 3 of us in Austin that had DAWs at that time, one of which was Barbara K from Timbuk 3, who was able to sync her Sound Tools system to a Fostex time code DAT machine, and earned a mention in Roger Nichols column in EQ magazine.

The other was David Roach, local tech genius who helped pioneer Apple's voice recognition software. We spent hours experimenting with the Sound Tools DAW & the new DECK 4-track software, which was very buggy, but amazing at the time, 2-3 years before Pro Tools appeared.

Best, JT
Old 2nd May 2016
  #15
.
1995 !! :-)
.
Attached Thumbnails
Vintage DAW Museum :~)>-10676271_848612141856189_8588998846604075267_n.jpg  
Old 2nd May 2016
  #16
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JIRI PASKA View Post
.
1995 !! :-)
.
like the fact that one eq, one compressor, one player and a pc is a high end mastering rig here, perhaps something to learn there.
Old 2nd May 2016
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe_caithness View Post
like the fact that one eq, one compressor, one player and a pc is a high end mastering rig here, perhaps something to learn there.
Great Pic! AMS Neve compressor, Focusrite EQ, dorrough meters, sony digital tape machine. nice & simple!

Best, JT
Old 28th May 2016
  #18
Lives for gear
 

bump!
Old 28th May 2016
  #19

The final versions of Sound Designer II (2.8) and Masterlist CD (2.4),
running an early Mac G4 on OS9.1,
with an 8x Yamaha CD burner connected via SCSI.
circa 2000AD

as an added bonus I opened the SD2 built in parametric DSP!

Best, JT
Old 28th May 2016
  #20

Shortly after 2000 AD I migrated over to EMagic's WaveBurner Pro which had excellent audio quality, POWR dither, and burned great CD masters, before it tragically was acquired by Apple!
You can see the familiar layout of the tracks is very much like Sonic, a welcome change from the EDL.
JT

Last edited by Jerry Tubb; 29th May 2016 at 02:44 PM..
Old 29th May 2016
  #21
Lives for gear
The clear plastic wired USB keyboards that shipped with those G4 towers were heavy and excellent. Great typing keyboards. I used that keyboard for a long time after the G4 was retired.

The clear plastic wired mouse not so much. As best I recall, Apple was trying to be cute (as usual) with a "different mouse". Rather than a mouse button on the top, some kind of levered paddle on the bottom that would close a microswitch when the mouse was pushed down. Was real awkward to "lift and move the mouse" with the button held down, because the button was on the bottom. Had to squeeze the edges of the silly mouse to hold the lever in place while lifting the mouse.

Back then a lot of music software had knobs and "mousable text fields" you would click and drag up/down to adjust. If a control had to be moved a long distance, it was a common gesture to drag-lift-drag-lift several times in succession with the button held down, to scroll to a distant value. No fun having to squeeze the sides of that silly mouse to keep the bottom-paddle button held down for those "multi-drag" gestures.
Old 29th May 2016
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcjr View Post
The clear plastic wired USB keyboards that shipped with those G4 towers were heavy and excellent. Great typing keyboards. I used that keyboard for a long time after the G4 was retired.
I think I'm still using that heavy keyboard in my office!

I switched to the Kensington Trackball so long ago, don't ever remember using the G4 mouse!

But 16 years later the G4 still rocks! Although I only fire it up for restoring legacy sessions.

Best, JT
Old 4th June 2016
  #23
Gear Maniac
Never thought to take pictures. I may have some old cut sheets around somewhere. I'll have to dig them out. That was about 1995.
The rig was a 486 / win 3.1 / running Spectral Prismatica, a smaller version of the Spectral Synthesis engine. The thing was rock solid. It would hold, I don't know, 96 tracks? But only play 12 at a time. I was finally able to import 8 tracks at a time from my Tascam DA-38's. I still have the format converters, "Translator"s, since they convert TDIF / ADAT / Y2 and AES. They come in handy from time to time with transfers.

The CD burner was a Yamaha 4x that still worked some 4 years later when I upgraded to a 24 bit system. Too bad I couldn't find drivers for it.

The whole system had quirks. The Spectral was a self-contained system on cards that hardly talked to the rest of the system. You couldn't even shuffle files from the Spectral drives to the system drives. Since the CD burner worked from the system drives, you had to loop the 2-mix - somehow really odd, I don't remember - from the Spectral drives, in real time, to the system drives, leaving the correct amount of space between tracks for mastering. What fun for a guy that had never seen a computer before.

Oh... I said rock solid? That was until I made the mistake of using the computer for stuff other than audio. Then it became unstable and I was nuking the system and reinstalling the OS - remember poking in a dozen 3.5" floppies to install the OS? Oh, and re-installing the CDR, which meant going into the system files and adding lines of "code", essentially manually installing drivers so the CDR would work.

Did I mention that I had never seen a computer before then? And apparently no one else had ever seen a CDR. The only help was Yamaha tech. NOBODY had a CDR near me.

What fun! I learned a lot, but I don't miss those days.
Old 4th June 2016
  #24
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Tubb View Post
I think I'm still using that heavy keyboard in my office!

I switched to the Kensington Trackball so long ago, don't ever remember using the G4 mouse!

But 16 years later the G4 still rocks! Although I only fire it up for restoring legacy sessions.

Best, JT
Thanks Jerry

I need to fire mine up one day and see if it still runs, with the cheetah scsi raid and a bunch of fans in the bottom of it. When I quit using the G4, left it "abandoned" under the old home studio desk, still wired up mostly. PCI 324 card and MOTU 2408 audio interface and MOTU MTPII midi interface. A couple years ago tore out most of the rack gear and synths, cleaned up, sorted into "working" and "non-working" stacks. But didn't get to the computer yet.

When I got too busy programming and moved the programming gear to the house, after a few years of the old studio's dis-use, a visiting musician friend looked into the old studio building with all the gear sitting in-place long-disused. He said it looked like an abandoned building scene from a roadwarrior movie.

They used to make (maybe still do) computer keyboards with the usual alpha and numeric pad areas, with about a 1.5" track ball in-between the two, above the area where they usually put the up/down/left/right cursor keys. I liked using those for some years, but the ones I had were ADB and had to be retired when ADB was discontinued.

Lately have enjoyed logitech k400 wireless keyboards. No numeric pad, but I don't drastically need numeric pad. It works good in parallel with a mouse, and the little keyboard can be moved from place to place where convenient. Either use the trackpad or the wireless mouse, whichever is most convenient to the task.

Had the identical setup for mac pro and PC, just grab whichever one is needed at the time. Had a red mouse for the PC and a blue mouse for the mac so I could tell em apart. Labels on the keyboards to tell em apart. They also make (or made) a bluetooth version I used to use on androids or macbook, but haven't needed it lately.



Hmm, logitech makes an M570 wireless trackball that works with the unifying receiver. So it could be used in parallel along with mouse and trackpad. Whichever is best for the task. Been so many years since I used a trackball. Interesting idea.
Old 5th June 2016
  #25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcjr View Post
Thanks Jerry

I need to fire mine up one day and see if it still runs, with the cheetah scsi raid and a bunch of fans in the bottom of it. When I quit using the G4, left it "abandoned" under the old home studio desk, still wired up mostly. PCI 324 card and MOTU 2408 audio interface and MOTU MTPII midi interface. A couple years ago tore out most of the rack gear and synths, cleaned up, sorted into "working" and "non-working" stacks. But didn't get to the computer yet.

When I got too busy programming and moved the programming gear to the house, after a few years of the old studio's dis-use, a visiting musician friend looked into the old studio building with all the gear sitting in-place long-disused. He said it looked like an abandoned building scene from a roadwarrior movie.

They used to make (maybe still do) computer keyboards with the usual alpha and numeric pad areas, with about a 1.5" track ball in-between the two, above the area where they usually put the up/down/left/right cursor keys. I liked using those for some years, but the ones I had were ADB and had to be retired when ADB was discontinued.

Lately have enjoyed logitech k400 wireless keyboards. No numeric pad, but I don't drastically need numeric pad. It works good in parallel with a mouse, and the little keyboard can be moved from place to place where convenient. Either use the trackpad or the wireless mouse, whichever is most convenient to the task.

Had the identical setup for mac pro and PC, just grab whichever one is needed at the time. Had a red mouse for the PC and a blue mouse for the mac so I could tell em apart. Labels on the keyboards to tell em apart. They also make (or made) a bluetooth version I used to use on androids or macbook, but haven't needed it lately.



Hmm, logitech makes an M570 wireless trackball that works with the unifying receiver. So it could be used in parallel along with mouse and trackpad. Whichever is best for the task. Been so many years since I used a trackball. Interesting idea.
That a really interesting looking keyboard! Never seen one with a trackpad built in.

Speaking of road warriors, I've watched the new Mad Max: Fury Road movie about a dozen times now, a fascinating sequel on the whole theme. It's often on TV when I get home from the studio at night.

I've been using a dual DAW setup (both Macs) for many years now, with 2 keyboards, one mouse and the big trackball. Honestly I think the mouse is faster and more accurate, but the trackball is easier on the repetitive stress to the hand & arm.

Sounds like you're way ahead of me with the latest innovations in peripheral devices!

Best, JT
Old 5th June 2016
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by plus6vu View Post
Never thought to take pictures. I may have some old cut sheets around somewhere. I'll have to dig them out. That was about 1995.
The rig was a 486 / win 3.1 / running Spectral Prismatica, a smaller version of the Spectral Synthesis engine. The thing was rock solid. It would hold, I don't know, 96 tracks? But only play 12 at a time. I was finally able to import 8 tracks at a time from my Tascam DA-38's. I still have the format converters, "Translator"s, since they convert TDIF / ADAT / Y2 and AES. They come in handy from time to time with transfers.

The CD burner was a Yamaha 4x that still worked some 4 years later when I upgraded to a 24 bit system. Too bad I couldn't find drivers for it.

The whole system had quirks. The Spectral was a self-contained system on cards that hardly talked to the rest of the system. You couldn't even shuffle files from the Spectral drives to the system drives. Since the CD burner worked from the system drives, you had to loop the 2-mix - somehow really odd, I don't remember - from the Spectral drives, in real time, to the system drives, leaving the correct amount of space between tracks for mastering. What fun for a guy that had never seen a computer before.

Oh... I said rock solid? That was until I made the mistake of using the computer for stuff other than audio. Then it became unstable and I was nuking the system and reinstalling the OS - remember poking in a dozen 3.5" floppies to install the OS? Oh, and re-installing the CDR, which meant going into the system files and adding lines of "code", essentially manually installing drivers so the CDR would work.

Did I mention that I had never seen a computer before then? And apparently no one else had ever seen a CDR. The only help was Yamaha tech. NOBODY had a CDR near me.

What fun! I learned a lot, but I don't miss those days.
We've also got 2 old Mac G3 desktops running OS8, neither one has been booted for years. I keep 'em around in case I need to dig really deep into the archives from the 90s and restore a very old session. Also have the old Yamaha 4x CD burners that require the caddie to load a disc! I paid a small fortune for this stuff back in the day, seems like that Yamaha burner was 3k at the time. I also had two of the old $ony 900 CD writers that weighed a ton and were slow as Christmas, but I donated them to the Goodwill computer museum a few years ago!
We have lots of extra space back in the shop at our studio, I like keeping much of the old gear around, as it's earned its place of honor on the shelf! One day I'll probably clean house, which I do occasionally, especially with pieces that aren't mission critical to our deep archives. I.e. Recently contributed an old Mac G5 to recycling.
When this DAW stuff was bleeding edge back in the early 90s it was lots of fun to tinker with, nowadays I see the DAW gear pretty much as tools to get the mastering tasks done with the best quality and efficiency as possible.

Best, JT
Old 9th October 2016
  #28
Lives for gear
 
Virtalahde's Avatar
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I saw one of these sitting on a shelf back in 1998.. I was told you did a fadeout and took a coffee break while it was calculated. Would be interesting to get one, but I would pay max 50,00€ for one.

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Audio sampling to 16-bit resolution can be set to 32 kHz, 44.056 kHz, 44.1 kHz, or 48 kHz rates
What's a 44,056kHz rate?
Old 9th October 2016
  #29
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Originally Posted by Virtalahde View Post
What's a 44,056kHz rate?
30 fps > 29.97 fps
44100 Hz > 44056 Hz
This may be used to convert files in the NTSC world where one second actually lasts 1001 ms.
Old 9th October 2016
  #30
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Originally Posted by Virtalahde View Post
What's a 44,056kHz rate?
Early digital recorders (e.g. EIAJ Sony PCM-F1, PCM-501 and PCM-701) used NTSC video with 245 lines per field and 59.94 fields, hence the 44,056 samples per stereo channel.

PAL has 294 lines and 50 fields, resulting in 44,100 samples per stereo channel.
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