Filing Construction Permits - NYC
Old 26th March 2013
  #1
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Filing Construction Permits - NYC

Hello All,

I am about to embark on building out a commercial audio post facility in NYC (Brooklyn). My builder/designer was saying that it would be great if we could find a location that wouldn't require "filing" as a basis for lease. But most of the spaces I have seen are requiring this. NYC has numerous building requirements which can cause massive headaches. One in particular is the need to include a ramp to any elevated level. So if we have a 4-5" floated floor, NYC requires a ramp 1' for every 1"elevation, thus we would need a 4-5' ramp with handrails. This cuts into the space and is aesthetically not-so-hot. I have been in many commercial recording facilities in the city that do not have these sorts of things. I understand the need to have proper wiring up to code (well everything up to code), but I would love any insight into filing with the DOB - specifically in NYC? I want to do this right, but would like to understand a little bit more about filing and permits and how they pertain to audio studios. I should also add that this will be a buildout of an existing space - no structural changes minus adding an external/split AC unit, moving plumbing, and changing the gas heating. Thanks!
Old 26th March 2013
  #2
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The HC laws exist for a very god reason...... and a ramp with handrails is not necessarily either obtrusive or unattractive.

However - the fines for doing work without permits - and for failing to meet HC requirements can be pretty stiff - not to mention the costs afterwards when forced to update the property to meet the codes. Besides which, this is not only a NYC requirement - it is a federal requirement.

There are plenty of existing buildings that do not meet code - although unless the spaces within the building are not HC accessible (for example an upper floor in a building that does not have an elevator) they are required to upgrade and provide accessible means of access.

Personally this is not an issue I would try to "get around".

As far as a lease goes in this regard - I would be quite surprised to find a property owner that did not require permits (for work requiring the same) as a part of the lease agreement........ I sure as heck would.

Rod
Old 26th March 2013
  #3
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Hi Rod,

Thank you for your response, very much appreciated - especially coming from you. I am fully prepared, and honestly would feel better, to be fully filed. As I said I plan on doing this right from the start. I have worked in studios that cut corners and it always made things difficult - and ended up costing more over time. The discussion came up with a few different people (builders and brokers alike) and I just wanted to get some insight into what goes into filing specifically for an audio studio. Again thank you very much.

Best...
Old 26th March 2013
  #4
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+1 for Rod's response - i'll add that it's probably helpful to "exceed" the specification slightly on the ramp to avoid the dreaded "you're 1mm over so tear it apart and redo it" inspection surprise. one of the contractors on a project in NYC has had this experience so they extended our ramp by about 12" (on a 16' ramp) to get it just under the 12"/1" because they've had a few projects where the inspector failed them by finding a minute difference once the flooring went on...
Old 26th March 2013
  #5
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Ahh, that would be horrible. Will definitely go by the books with probably a little bit extra added. Thanks very much.
Old 26th March 2013
  #6
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Rod Gervais's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gullfo View Post
+1 for Rod's response - i'll add that it's probably helpful to "exceed" the specification slightly on the ramp to avoid the dreaded "you're 1mm over so tear it apart and redo it" inspection surprise. one of the contractors on a project in NYC has had this experience so they extended our ramp by about 12" (on a 16' ramp) to get it just under the 12"/1" because they've had a few projects where the inspector failed them by finding a minute difference once the flooring went on...
Wow - that sucks.......

Personally I probably would have challenged them - there are allowances for construction tolerance...... a "grain of sand" should not screw you - but sometimes, when you challenge, the inspectors can decide to screw with you in other regards (they are often little tyrants when challenged.)

So either be very careful - or very VERY good (I try to lean towards the latter.)

BTW - in the 2010 ADA (So Federal now - not NY Specific) this for the addition of ramps in existing buildings:

Table 405.2 Maximum Ramp Slope and Rise for Existing Sites, Buildings, and Facilities

..................Slope.................................................Maximum Rise
Steeper than 1:10 but not steeper than 1:8........... 3 inches (75 mm)
Steeper than 1:12 but not steeper than 1:10......... 6 inches (150 mm)

Rod
Old 26th March 2013
  #7
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yeah, we decided that is was only a small change in amongst many and avoids any potential for nit picking and further "issues" which lead to failed inspections once the cranial-rectumitus comes out...
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