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Improving on a hollow core door? Isolation not important.
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3rd Degree
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#1
9th January 2013
Old 9th January 2013
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Improving on a hollow core door? Isolation not important.

Sorry for my addiction to this forum, I finally bought a house and now I can do a few things I could never do in the past.

I can't easily replace the door in my room as my door frame/door jamb (not sure what you call it lol) would need total replacement to put something heavier on. It only has two hinges to begin with. Secondly, the screws were really loose to where they would pop out until I filled them with epoxy and re-drilled them, as per my father's advice.

I did a search and most of what I found was about isolation, not treatment. I am making the assumption that they are not the best, left alone, for accustics, could be wrong on that.

I first thought about drilling holes and putting expanding foam in it. Couldn't really find if this is beneficial or not from a purely acoustic standpoint, just figured out it's not best for isolation.

That got me thinking. I could cut out a 2ftx4ft or 2ftx6ft section of the front of the door, on the side facing the studio. I could then put a 1in 703 or similar panel in the door.

Then I figured I could go further and put expanding foam in the rest of the door, use some 1 in floor boards to frame out the 703 panel, cover it with fabric. I think it would look nice, hopefully keep it shape with the foam and frame, and be a good solution without redoing my whole door frame/trim to support something heavier.

This is a non to scale, terrible sketch of what I am thinking. Is this a good idea or a waste of time?

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9th January 2013
Old 9th January 2013
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Sounds like a lot of work with a potential for limited benefit. Embedding a 703 panel without a frame and air gap probably won't do much for you, and you'll have a cut up door. If isolation isn't an issue, I guess the first question might be why alter the door at all? If it's located in a point in the room (e.g. first point of reflection) where you might need a panel, I guess that would explain it. That said, and given the fact that the door seems a bit beat up, you might want to consider a replacement. Maybe a solid core door, pre hung. You can buy one at Home Depot or Lowes (special order) and they typically come with a seal. Not high in sound isolation, but a far sight better than a hollow door. Then, buy a few tubes of acoustic caulk for around the frame, and put in molding over top. Now, what you'll have is a bit more isolation, and a solid surface upon which you can mount things (like fully built / purchased broad band panels) without fear of them falling down.
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9th January 2013
Old 9th January 2013
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Are you only concerned with acoustics here? If all you want is the fiberglass panel to deal with reflections - why not just add it to the face of the existing door?

Forget expansive foam inside the door in any regard - hollow core doors are constructed using a honeycomb inside of the door glued to both face panels - this is generally a cardboard product with roughly 1 1/2 to 2" squares supporting the panel to create a rigid body. Even if you cut the end off a door completely you could not fill it with foam (or anything else for that matter) you would have to either remove one face in it's entirety - or make holes in one face in each of the honeycomb locations in order to fill the door with anything.

Google Image Result for http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ueAq78vi5nE/To5YqGYB-ZI/AAAAAAAAABA/eL5OKR5L6ns/s1600/Anatomy-of-a-Hollow-Core-Door-Slab.jpg

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9th January 2013
Old 9th January 2013
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It may be a lot of work but it's less work, for me, than putting in a new door frame as I don't know how to do it, nor do I have the tools. My father will likely help me do this down the road, I just don't want to ask him between him retiring soon, a death in the family and dealing with the estate, etc. So, in many ways, it's actually easier. The door isn't in bad shape, it's not new but not that old, it's the actual frame that is in bad shape.

I guess that's really my question, is it even worth it or just skip it for now? Sounds like it isn't really worth it.

It's going to be challenging to put anything on the door of substance, I have just over 2 inches of room since the door is in the corner to have nothing hit while it's open.

As for the foam, I am aware of the the cardboard but I didn't realize it was that much. Growing up in a home with 2 brothers, we broke things a lot, including doors. I don't remember our doors having more than 3-4 pieces of cardboard that were horizontal and one or two that were vertical. I could be wrong since I only know from being thrown/throwing someone through these, lol, so my memory isn't the best. If it's really that little of an area, that obviously won't be worth the work, especially if I want it to look half way decent in the end, unless I just put a new face on it.

Anyway, it sounds like it just really isn't worth it. I would love for more to weigh in on this. Once I get good at using a miter saw, I do plan on making something stronger to hang a better door.
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13th January 2013
Old 13th January 2013
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Again, if your issue is acoustics, why not just put a broad band panel on a movable stand, and put it in front of the inside of the door when recording / mixing. Would probably get you by for awhile
rez
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14th January 2013
Old 14th January 2013
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we have a door at the back corner of our control room and it was the weak spot because it was so much thinner and lighter than the wall in the opposite corner. our solution to make it thicker and heavier was to simply screw a layer of thick gypsum cardboard onto the door.
it´s the same principle like when building a room where often the walls will be made of double layers of gypsum cardboard to gain mass.

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14th January 2013
Old 14th January 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rez View Post
we have a door at the back corner of our control room and it was the weak spot because it was so much thinner and lighter than the wall in the opposite corner. our solution to make it thicker and heavier was to simply screw a layer of thick gypsum cardboard onto the door.
it´s the same principle like when building a room where often the walls will be made of double layers of gypsum cardboard to gain mass.

peace, rez
rez,

I believe he is only concerned with acoustics not isolation.

Rod
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14th January 2013
Old 14th January 2013
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I will +1 the 'trap on movable stand' rather than butchering your door.

If you do butcher the door... you will have to replace it if you ever move... which will involve hanging (and framing) a new door anyhow. If the frame is the weak point, it would make sense to frame in a new door if it is bothering you. You get points for creativity, but IMO unless you're trying for more isolation; you'd be better off leaving it as is (or completely replacing door and frame).

{edit}: being the youngest brother.. i was usually the one who's head went through the door... +1 on Rod's assesment of it probably being honeycomb inside. Not to mention even if it wasn't, you'd probably split the door open by using expanding foam.
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