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Green glue, how "glue" is it?
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OpusOfTrolls
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5th December 2012
Old 5th December 2012
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Green glue, how "glue" is it?

How strong is Green Glue? Could it support 2lbs/sqft when applied as directed?
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It will not glue anything together.
It is a dampening compound.
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When applied as directed, it is screwed into place back to the stud, joist or furring channel.
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I respect what green glue is, and the job it does as a CLD... but DO also respect what the directions say about avoiding spilling and immediate clean up!

While certainly not a glue, it certainly does get sticky!

I had some spillage that I didn't notice, and a piece of scrap gypsum managed to fall on the drippage. In typical fashion, I didn't find it until it had sat there for about 2 days. It took me a good bit of time to get the scrap of gypsum up, and it still left a good bit of residue on the unsealed concrete floor.

I eventually got it all up, but it took several hours of hand scrubbing with "scotchbrite pads" and lots of hot water to dissolve it.

Again, it's not a glue, but it will hold things together... especially stuff you don't want stuck together. (Just a word to the wise.)
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OpusOfTrolls
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Yeah okay, it's not a glue but do you think it could hold a piece of sheetrock to the wall?
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Why would you? The screws provide the compressive force to squeeze the material to a thin film.

Completely unadvisable to layer drywall on without screws. Also against building code.

I think you may be unnecessarily demonizing the screws.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpusOfTrolls View Post
Yeah okay, it's not a glue but do you think it could hold a piece of sheetrock to the wall?
For a day? A year? 5 years? 10 years? Who knows seeing as no tests have ever been performed to determine it's long term ability in that regard. Bottom line is that it might - but then it would not work properly - the screws are a necessary part of the equation here.

That aside - trying something like this would be a huge violation of the building codes. There is no adhesive in existence that is approved for the application you speak of here.

Drywall needs (for safety reasons) to be physically attached to structure...

Rod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Gervais View Post
For a day? A year? 5 years? 10 years? Who knows seeing as no tests have ever been performed to determine it's long term ability in that regard. Bottom line is that it might - but then it would not work properly - the screws are a necessary part of the equation here.

That aside - trying something like this would be a huge violation of the building codes. There is no adhesive in existence that is approved for the application you speak of here.

Drywall needs (for safety reasons) to be physically attached to structure...

Rod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpusOfTrolls View Post
Yeah okay, it's not a glue but do you think it could hold a piece of sheetrock to the wall?
While it "might" hold 2 pieces of gypsum board together, its gonna be funny watching someone try to hold those two boards together for a week or so (24 hours/day at that), waiting for it to get tacky enough to hold.

IIRC, Green Glue states that it can take up to 30 days to "cure". So, even holding it in place for 30 days might not be adequate.

I'm with everyone else on this, but just curious why anyone would even try to do this, violate building codes and all manners of logical thinking....

Just put the screws in and be done with it.
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I've actually had similar questions, just because screws deform the drywall and form a series of constrained points on the sheet. It was just a thought experiment on my part because I know drywall has to be attached for code compliance and logically should be. But if you brainstorm along the lines of MLV traps, VPRs, etc., thinking of a drywall/GG/drywall trap is an easy extension to ponder.

BTW, I was the victim of failed drywall glue on the ceiling of a house I used to own. The contractor put up one layer of drywall with screws, then glued on a 2nd layer, taped, finished and sprayed texture. When the glue was about 20 years old, it began to fail and I had a lousy fixit job to do.
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As noted above - the screws are in integral part of this assembly in order for it to work correctly.
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6th December 2012
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I was thinking of using it to attach drywall inbetween stud cavities on the inside on a single wall, without having to screw into the existing structure (exterior sheathing or studs). Any advice in this regard?
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In that case I have a detail in my book that outlines how to achieve that - you will need to temporarily brace the layers in order to hold them in place during the installation - I find that toe nailing with 4d nails into the stud all around the sheet works wekk for that purpose - after which you provide backer rod and caulk at the edges - and then - once finished with how ever many layers you install - you provide a furring strip around the entire perimeter to lock the sheets in place.

Rod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod Gervais View Post
In that case I have a detail in my book that outlines how to achieve that - you will need to temporarily brace the layers in order to hold them in place during the installation - I find that toe nailing with 4d nails into the stud all around the sheet works wekk for that purpose - after which you provide backer rod and caulk at the edges - and then - once finished with how ever many layers you install - you provide a furring strip around the entire perimeter to lock the sheets in place.

Rod
Wait, that is inside the stud cavity, paneling the drywall behind the exterior sheath?

EDIT: I understand now.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpusOfTrolls View Post
Wait, that is inside the stud cavity, paneling the drywall behind the exterior sheath?
It certainly is that. In the 1st edition it is shown for a floor assembly - but the technique is the same for a wall - in the 2nd edition it shows both conditions - including pictures of a garage conversion I designed that uses that technique for the outside walls.

Rod
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Would it be viable to constrain the drywall against the sheathing with a dense mineral wool? Or would the constrained insulation reduce STC?

EDIT: I suppose there is also the compression of the GG to account for. Thanks for the tips Rod! I will be picking up your book when I get around to building this.
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Opus,

Not trying to make a book sale here - if this is your only question then I would not mind sending you a detail and saving you the cash....

I would not use the compression approach you speak of - dense insultion is not good for low frequency isolation - much better of with fluffy......

Rod
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You say you have access to the back of the wall, in between the studs. Do you have temporary access to the finished side of that same wall? If so, hold a piece of plywood on the finished side as a nail base. Then from the unfinished side, screw your drywall and GG strip through the original drywall, and into the ply on the other side. You need to compress that GG. The screws will anchor in the ply and compress the system.

After a week or so, the screws can be backed out, the plywood removed, and the little screw holes patched. This technique has been done a lot with great success.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post
You say you have access to the back of the wall, in between the studs. Do you have temporary access to the finished side of that same wall? If so, hold a piece of plywood on the finished side as a nail base. Then from the unfinished side, screw your drywall and GG strip through the original drywall, and into the ply on the other side. You need to compress that GG. The screws will anchor in the ply and compress the system.

After a week or so, the screws can be backed out, the plywood removed, and the little screw holes patched. This technique has been done a lot with great success.
I can only work from the inside of an exterior wall. I don't think it is a sound idea for me to do any destructive modification on the exterior sheathing. I had a bit of trouble understanding your method, but to compress to the exterior sheathing would be what I am attempting to do.
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So you'd adding drywall and GG to exterior sheathing? You can screw to the sheathing. Just be cognizant of the screw length.
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Do you recommend any kind of moisture barrier?
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That would render the CLD application null and void. You would have to install the barrier after the drywall was applied.
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What ever is proscribed in your area for vapor barrier is what should be followed.

In climates that have to deal with cold winter months a barrier should be applied to the inside face (room side) of the insulation prior to installing drywall - in Hot climes it should be applied to the outside face of the insulation.

Rod
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