Login / Register
 
Soundproofing for Live Band Room
New Reply
Subscribe
JazzDeath
Thread Starter
#1
9th June 2012
Old 9th June 2012
  #1
Gear interested
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 20

Thread Starter
JazzDeath is offline
Soundproofing for Live Band Room

Hi!

*I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this question, so if it isn't, please direct me to an appropriate forum or website*

My band is about to buy a house and we plan on recording and rehearsing at all hours of the day.

We were wondering what the best possible option would be when it comes to soundproofing a room so that the neighbors do not hear us practice (at all!)

Budget is not so much of an issue (We are well aware it will cost anywhere from 5000 to 10 000 in materials if we build it ourselves), the idea is to completely and utterly soundproof a room from the outside world.

We play very, very loud music (Metal) and use mesa-boogie amps and cabinets for both guitars and bass, and a dw drum kit, and we were wondering if total soundproofing is even possible if we plan on jamming up to 3-4 am in the morning...

We were told that the best option would be to build a room inside of a room and use some sort of spring mechanism to hold up the "floating room" (I guess?), but we really have no idea as to what materials are necessary or how to go about building this project.

Does anyone have any idea or experience for how to do this, or perhaps know a reference website that could point us in the right direction? Detailed plans are definitely a plus.

Thank you!
#2
9th June 2012
Old 9th June 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
gullfo's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Old Tappan, NJ USA
Posts: 1,426

Send a message via Skype™ to gullfo
gullfo is offline
to isolate (assuming 120db inside) and depending on the house, the neighborhood, and noise laws etc you should test existing isolation and have a structural engineer review what can be done in terms of mass since you'll probably need to update the room with 10-12 tons of materials. $10K isn't even close.
__________________
Glenn

www.runnel.com
JazzDeath
Thread Starter
#3
9th June 2012
Old 9th June 2012
  #3
Gear interested
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 20

Thread Starter
JazzDeath is offline
How do I go about testing isolation?

... 10-12 tons of material?!? And how much do you reckon it would cost approximatively?
#4
10th June 2012
Old 10th June 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
John White's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 503

John White is offline
Before trying to estimate your costs, one would need to know your current layout and how far away your neighbors are. Also what the external noise environment is like now.
__________________
-john
#5
10th June 2012
Old 10th June 2012
  #5
Lives for gear
 
gullfo's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Old Tappan, NJ USA
Posts: 1,426

Send a message via Skype™ to gullfo
gullfo is offline
best bet - set up your loudest PA system inside your room and run sine sweeps, pink noise, and drums & bass music @ 120db and then use a sound level meter to assess the levels at your property lines and right outside the house. also walk out a bit further and see if you have sound coming from the roof which may be noticeable out on the street or further away. make a lot of notes about the windows, doors, etc where the sound levels are the highest. you will also want to tap around on the room surfaces with metal and rubber mallets to determine how well those sounds propagate through your structure.
finally detailed drawings of the room, photos of the house and structure ones will be important, and a property map showing neighbors etc. include your location since noise ordinances vary.
10-12 tons assumes you're building out framing and drywall. if you're going to use a concrete bunker you're probably looking at 60-70 tons easily.
JazzDeath
Thread Starter
#6
10th June 2012
Old 10th June 2012
  #6
Gear interested
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 20

Thread Starter
JazzDeath is offline
There's no way of estimating costs before having the room in question, does it vary heavily?

How much does the distance of your neighbors affect the amount of money necessary to properly soundproof a room from their hearing? Such as, is there a really huge difference between a neighbor 2 meters away and 50 meters away or is it moreso affected by the level of noise outside? I imagine when a house is really close the bass frequencies affect their foundation more easily, but I'm just guessing here...

Also is it easier to soundproof a room at ground level or in a basement, and what are the main differences?

What about soundproofing a room in a house entirely made of wood? (Logwood, wood panels inside, wooden floors..?)

We don't own the house yet, and so we are looking as to what the optimal type of house would be where we could soundproof a room from our neighbors efficiently without spending... well, over 10 grand is way too much I think, since we also need to spend money buying amps for tracking our album.

Perhaps I should reformulate my question as to what the criteria should be if we want to find a house (in this specific case, a room) that we can soundproof from neighbors at all times of day for maximum 10 000 dollars in materials, not including handiwork (we plan on doing it ourselves).

I'm sorry if my original question was not clear or specific enough (I suppose this one might not be either...) but I'm trying to grasp what this implies as well as possible before we decide to purchase a place, so that we don't find out afterwards that we have a problem with soundproofing costs... Finding the most cost-efficient and hassle-free type of environment is crucial to this project succeeding.
#7
10th June 2012
Old 10th June 2012
  #7
Lives for gear
 
gullfo's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Old Tappan, NJ USA
Posts: 1,426

Send a message via Skype™ to gullfo
gullfo is offline
so a couple of options come to mind - buying a concrete or block house with a large deep basement with a lot of distance from the neighbors will be easier to contain than a frame house with the room(s) above ground and neighbors 2m away... by an order of magnitude.

also consider this - a drum room and an amp room. if this is about recording and not wild jam fests, then properly isolating the drums and amps will be more feasible than a large open space. also using small amps or ITB amp sims will make it easier as well as preserve your hearing. where are you planning on mixing all this?
#8
10th June 2012
Old 10th June 2012
  #8
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,980

2manyrocks is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by gullfo View Post
so a couple of options come to mind - buying a concrete or block house with a large deep basement with a lot of distance from the neighbors will be easier to contain than a frame house with the room(s) above ground and neighbors 2m away... by an order of magnitude.

also consider this - a drum room and an amp room. if this is about recording and not wild jam fests, then properly isolating the drums and amps will be more feasible than a large open space. also using small amps or ITB amp sims will make it easier as well as preserve your hearing. where are you planning on mixing all this?
When I read the OP, this ought to be #1 on your shopping list.
JazzDeath
Thread Starter
#9
10th June 2012
Old 10th June 2012
  #9
Gear interested
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 20

Thread Starter
JazzDeath is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
When I read the OP, this ought to be #1 on your shopping list.
Thank you for the concern, but my band jams with not only in-ear monitors but earcups on top of those to protect our hearing...

The room will serve both for tracking and for regular jamming/show preparation for my band, because of this it requires enough soundproofing to control the sound of a whole band playing at once. The tracking itself will most likely not cause much noise until the re-amping stage itself, it is uncertain whether we will be recording the actual drums on site, it heavily depends on the natural acoustics of the room and whether it's workable for the sound that we want/pricing involved to make a viable drum room. Also separate is whether a full kit of drum mics will be in our budget, after all other expenses considered.

There will be a dry booth for vocal recording elsewhere in the house.

When it comes to live jam recording the idea is not to release these recordings it's moreso as a personal reference for the band and perhaps some performance videos/drum videos.

Of course our second option now might be to play with a real drum during the day and past a certain hour (Depending on local noise regulations and neighbor's sleep schedules, I imagine) we could play with our in-ear monitors and with an electronic drumset hooked up to Superior Drummer, for example, and run back through a console and into the auxiliaries for the in-ears, it is not the most ideal setup but most likely a much more cost-effective solution and will allow us to jam late at night without investing over 10k on a room...

Just to be clear, when I said "buying amps" I meant mic pre-amps, not guitar amplifiers, we already have full racks for that.

The mixing stage will most likely be done elsewhere with someone else, as we have no experience mixing and we are looking for a high quality job.

Thank you for all the tips Gulfo, very much appreciated. We will try to direct our real estate agent towards concrete/block houses that include a basement, and as isolated as possible, and once we find something suitable for our project we'll run the tests you mentionned.
#10
11th June 2012
Old 11th June 2012
  #10
Gear interested
 
Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 20

asolutions is offline
Soundproofing a Room

The most effective way to block noise from leaving the room would be, as stated, adding very heavy material to the walls. Since you are planning on using an existing space, you will need to do some retrofitting. Vinyl sound-blocking barriers are very effective at cutting decibels, but are usually installed inside of a wall during construction. What you could do, though, is install the vinyl barrier over your existing drywall, then add another layer of drywall over it. To get even better soundproofing results, you can add ANOTHER layer of drywall over that, with damping compound like QuietGlue Pro or Green Glue. You will use a few inches of space along the walls, but that is what you get when you soundproof post-construction. Acoustical caulk will also need to be used in all corners and gaps while applying these new layers, any small spaces you miss can let through up to 50% off the sound. Illustration With Green Glue, Sound Barrier and Isolation Clips | Acoustical Solutions, Inc.
#11
11th June 2012
Old 11th June 2012
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,980

2manyrocks is offline
Since you haven't bought anything yet, is a house with a basement your best option? Literally, I could have bought a 1960's brick and block elementary school building with a gym/auditorium, four classrooms, a paved parking lot, and a couple of acres for $40K, but passed because it was too big. It needed a roof, too, but the price per SF was cheap.

So are there other spaces besides a house with a large underground basement that would be worth looking at?

Or do you only want residential living space that you can practice in, too?
JazzDeath
Thread Starter
#12
11th June 2012
Old 11th June 2012
  #12
Gear interested
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 20

Thread Starter
JazzDeath is offline
It absolutely needs to be residential, yes. The idea is to have a workable headquarters for my band.
#13
12th June 2012
Old 12th June 2012
  #13
Lives for gear
 
avare's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2004
Location: Hamilton, On Canada
Posts: 4,733

avare is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by asolutions View Post
Vinyl sound-blocking barriers are very effective at cutting decibels, but are usually installed inside of a wall during construction. What you could do, though, is install the vinyl barrier over your existing drywall, then add another layer of drywall over it. To get even better soundproofing results, you can add ANOTHER layer of drywall over that, with damping compound like QuietGlue Pro or Green Glue.
Vinyl is not cost effective in that application. Just use extra layers of drywall.

Andre
__________________
Good studio building is 90% design and 10% construction.
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+ 
 
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
FunkyProduction / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
5
pkautzsch / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
1
Jimbo / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
2
andrewj / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording
11

Forum Jump

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.