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The Gaps Between the Traps
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Dayl
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12th April 2011
Old 12th April 2011
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The Gaps Between the Traps

Hi Guys,

The gaps between the traps. So I know that it is ideal to have a 4" gap with a 4" trap. But what about the side by side gaps? (on both walls and ceiling) does it help to keep things spaced? ... do the measurements tell you to do this or is it purely aesthetics?

Take this awesome room for example... it's unfinished in this pic, but you get the idea.

Taken from this great thread:
New studio from scratch/photo thread

Thanks
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The Gaps Between the Traps-studio-example.jpg  
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12th April 2011
Old 12th April 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayl View Post
Hi Guys,

The gaps between the traps. So I know that it is ideal to have a 4" gap with a 4" trap. But what about the side by side gaps? (on both walls and ceiling) does it help to keep things spaced? ... do the measurements tell you to do this or is it purely aesthetics?

Take this awesome room for example... it's unfinished in this pic, but you get the idea.

Taken from this great thread:
New studio from scratch/photo thread

Thanks
Hi Dayl,

an ETC measurement will tell you how strong the remaining reflections from the bare ceiling between the traps are. If they are below - 20 dB (or better below - 25 dB) compared to the direct signal you are safe.
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12th April 2011
Old 12th April 2011
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I think that's a good question.....

On the one hand it is often said that parallel opposing surfaces should not be left untreated.

On the other hand, it is often said that things should be as symmetrical as possible.

One doesn't really allow for the other.... and that's something I've been pondering too.

But then I guess like so many questions on what and how to treat - measurements will give you the answers - as Hannes says.
Dayl
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12th April 2011
Old 12th April 2011
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Thanks guys.

I guess we'll find out soon then, I'm heading into town to get that Behringer mic you suggested Max.

I had plans to build the front wall framed together in one unit but couldn't find many examples of this so... figured that there was something wrong there.

Can't wait to start measuring... this will be a learning curve.
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12th April 2011
Old 12th April 2011
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Originally Posted by Max Dread View Post
On the one hand it is often said that parallel opposing surfaces should not be left untreated.
Rules of thumb are always imprecise and can be misleading.

In this case, it doesn’t always apply to control room since the position of the receiver and sources are fixed. flutter echo between the rear sidewalls is not likely to occur unless the speakers and listener is moved to this area. Naturally, in a well treated control room, most of the surface area will be treated in one way or another.
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12th April 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayl View Post
So I know that it is ideal to have a 4" gap with a 4" trap. But what about the side by side gaps?
What matters most is the specific placement related to each speaker and the mix position. I'd probably put all the traps adjacent to avoid any gaps. This way the mix engineer can move around and always be in the "reflection-free" zone. But in practice it may not matter. It really depends on where sound from each speaker hits the ceiling.

--Ethan

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12th April 2011
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The 'no opposing wall' guide is generally a function of non-control room spaces. Symmetry is key in control rooms.

Regarding space between panels. Far too many variables. However, let's look at control room, first reflection reduction.

- is the gap between panels significant enough to allow ray energy to reach it? (this is not only variable by the width of the gap, but also the thickness of the panels)

- if yes, then is the thickness of the 'next' trap sufficient to contain the reflection, given angle of incidence?

-if yes, does the panel's construction allow for absorption on the sides?



Based on visual cues alone, I would hazard to guess that the photo linked in the op would be subjected to first reflections to the left and right of seated center... I.E. fine for a mix position, but inadequate for a mixing 'zone'.
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12th April 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer View Post
What matters most is the specific placement related to each speaker and the mix position. I'd probably put all the traps adjacent to avoid any gaps.
+1

This also minimizes the unwanted absorption caused by edge diffraction.
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12th April 2011
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Thanks guys.

Fun time will begin when the mic arrives.

Essentially, what I am proposing here is building a fake wall that is flush with the superchunks, that will have a 4" air gap behind but no other breathing space.
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