sHOWpONY
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#1
11th October 2010
Old 11th October 2010
  #1
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Ceiling Treatment

Can anyone here please make a suggestion on the best way to treat a ceiling in a carpetted control/recording space? I record vocals up here and sometimes drums. I have a problem with flutter echo AND am considering using more hard flooring when recording. The hard flooring will add to the reflections. So while I'm digging the 'liveliness' of the harder surfaces, I also want to maintain some control. I have plenty of acoustic treatment around the control area, which is actually a small alcove off the space shown - that area sounds tight.
So I'm figuring: treat the ceiling more.

The pics below show a 3D of my space.
The elevations with 'A' and 'B' indicate ceiling treatment options.

So, in the learned opinions of those holy and graced in the black art of acoustic design...Is it better to treat the ceiling planes (option B) or the the intersections (option A)?
Attached Thumbnails
Ceiling Treatment-ceiling-treatment_3d.jpg   Ceiling Treatment-ceiling-treatment_end-elev.jpg   Ceiling Treatment-ceiling-treatment_side-elev.jpg  
#2
11th October 2010
Old 11th October 2010
  #2
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Lightbulb

A peaked ceiling benefits from absorbers hanging under the peak. A peak shape tends to focus the sound. Focusing is bad, and is the opposite of diffusion which is good. The photo below shows what I did in my home studio.

--Ethan

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sHOWpONY
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#3
12th October 2010
Old 12th October 2010
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Hi Ethan, thanks for the feedback. I've spent some time checking out your very informative web site, so thanks for that too.

I see in your photograph how you've treated your end wall. Is there any benefit in fixing an angled absorber at the intersection of wall/both ceiling planes, like I've shown in my sketch?

Thanks again.

Amos
#4
12th October 2010
Old 12th October 2010
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Amos,

Yes. Angling absorption panels at boundary junctions can make very effective trapping.

Hanging panels as suggested under the peak will help greatly, but your main problem is not floor to ceiling reflections. Even untreated with a hardwood floor, the floor - ceiling path will not create flutter echo. It is your side walls.

Never let untreated surfaces face each other. There is a lot in this simple statement, but to make a long story short, you can checker board absorption panels on two walls to cure the flutter echo, ie; front wall and side wall. Angling plywood panels will also treat flutter echo. - The idea is to eliminate untreated parallel surfaces.

Cheers,
John
sHOWpONY
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#5
12th October 2010
Old 12th October 2010
  #5
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Hi John, perfect, thanks! I get that.
I'll experiment with the a checker pattern of rigid sound absorption on the upper side walls.

Thanks for the response.

Amos
#6
26th January 2011
Old 26th January 2011
  #6
Gear interested
 

Hi I'm a frequent reader of this board for 3 years but never posted before.

I have a room quite like you have. I am using it as a control room.
I am thinking on how to treat my room, right now I am following the guidelines and examples just like described on the Realtraps website. But since my ceiling is a little different from a 'regular' room just like this room, I was wondering If I also have to trap the corners where the front wall meets the ceiling?!

Because Ethan, you only treated the peak?!
#7
26th January 2011
Old 26th January 2011
  #7
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Lightbulb

Yes, the corner where a wall meets the ceiling is a great place for bass traps. Even if that angle is not exactly 90 degrees.

--Ethan

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#8
27th January 2011
Old 27th January 2011
  #8
Gear interested
 

Thnx for your answer Ethan!

I have got one more question regarding this. I included a sketch to illustrate my situation. I was talking about the corners were a drew a red basstrap in the illustration.
In my situation there is not much space to hang panels in those corners so I thought of a sort of a stretched cube if you know what I mean. This will be made of rockwool wrapped in fabric. So it's pretty much the same as a regular basstrap only there will be no wooden frame and it won't be shaped as a panel but as a sort of stretched cube. Will this still be effective?!

They basstraps I am talking about are marked red in this sketch.
Attached Thumbnails
Ceiling Treatment-mixroom-setup-2.jpg  
#9
27th January 2011
Old 27th January 2011
  #9
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Ethan Winer's Avatar
 

Lightbulb

Yes, cube shaped traps will work well in those corners, assuming they're large enough of course.

--Ethan

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