Building computer isobox. Suggestions for fans to use.
BobSchwenkler
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#1
9th September 2006
Old 9th September 2006
  #1
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Thread Starter
Building computer isobox. Suggestions for fans to use.

Anyone know of a quiet fan that come with its own PS (or is easy to power) that would work well for an isobox? I'm going to build a box with a baffling system to help keep noise from getting out, so THE quietest isn't neccessary.

Or, if anyone knows of a 2nd party fan that works well for a Quicksilver dual 1ghz, that might work too.
#2
9th September 2006
Old 9th September 2006
  #2
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I would'nt if I were you. A friend of mine did exactly the same thing, I told him not to, but....... he did it anyway and killed his mac the very first day it was in there. I called it a coffin not an iso box.

You are best off moving your computer to another room and extending the cables to your workstation. Or, I used a northbridge heatsink on my older pc as the nb fan was so damn noisy.

Get a silent or near silent power supply as the power suppy is somtimes the noisiest part. Also a good quality near silent fan for your cpu. After these mods you should be very impressed by the results.

I built my new computer with these components minus the northbridge heatsink,as it has'nt been noisy so far. If you put your computer in a non-specialised home made case you are begging for a meltdown. Modify it first, it's more effort but probably less trouble.

Heathen
#3
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
  #3
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u b k's Avatar
 

stick it in a closet, or under the kitchen cabinets, or on the other side of a wall. $15 usb extender cable and $25 monitor extender cable, done.

<silence>.

ahhhhh...



gregoire
del
ubk
.
SK1
#4
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
  #4
SK1
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I'm actually thinking about getting one of these :

http://www.kkaudio.com/quietrack.html

The 14 space with maple would match my desk perfectly ....... and it is convenient having the computer right there.
BUT $1400 usd !!! ....... I'm already in deep though. I'm hoping my guy can do it for maybe $900.

Have you guys ever heard about people having problems with commercial units like the kk audio ???

I don't want to spend all that cash and have it f my computer up.




To the original poster ... maybe you could rip off some ideas from the above design.
jdg
#5
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
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jdg
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#6
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
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I've ordered a Zalman TNN500A - Totally No Noise PC case & PSU. No fans! The whole case is a giant heat sink, and the MB bolts to the case in a way that conducts the heat away. Not cheap, but I think it's worth it.

(I have always run cables to keep my PC out of the mic room, but now i'm tired of the PC noise in my control room).

Also, i'm considering a Lynx AES16 card so I can run long digital cables - and if necessary move the whole PC even further away.
BobSchwenkler
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#7
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
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Thread Starter
I need something portable, and closets fall outside of that category... I do location work, and have decided to get rid of more portable computers I've tried and use the tower. It is much more reliable. For quieter acoustic stuff where I'm in the same room (which is often) I need something quite quiet.

If I build a box and put fans in it that are creating enough airflow, there ought to be no problem. I'd also use a thermometer with it to monitor temperature.

jdg, what did you use to power the fans you used? Are most of them just 12VDC or what?

Are there any good aftermarket cooling products out there for macs? PSUs and fans out there seem to be marketed for PC users. If there is something that really works out there that I can fit my computer with, I would rather do that than build a big box...
#8
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
  #8
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Seriously - Google "Zalman TNN500A". I intend to use it for mobile stuff too. Even though it's fairly heavy, silent is silent. It has handles and castors - it's lockable. The weight should deter the casual thief.
#9
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
  #9
#10
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdg View Post
i built one.
its pretty damned big tho.
lol, oh well.

i used two of these fans:
http://www.frozencpu.com/fan-200.html
What materials did you use to build it? And how effective is it at keeping the noise in and the heat out?

I've just made some built-in cupboards out of MDF and would like to store my PCs in there if I can control the noise and heat.

Anyone else made a DIY PC ISO cabinet?

Cheers.
jdg
#11
10th September 2006
Old 10th September 2006
  #11
jdg
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i just used cabnet grade 1/2inch plywood.

air intake in the front, exhaust port in the rear.

lined the interior with aurlex foam (only thing its good for it seems )

i can not hear the G5 now over ambient room noise.
it runs 24/7 no over heating yet, 6mo later.
i'll take pics later... im a bit laid up after some emergency surgery

edit:
for powering the fans.. i use a fan controller with an external 12vdc PS.
i'll post links to it later after i remember what kind it is.
#12
11th September 2006
Old 11th September 2006
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i dont think that zalman would work with a mac though. also is not cheap...$1200.
JGP
#13
11th September 2006
Old 11th September 2006
  #13
JGP
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You can certainly get 120v fans. I've sometimes wired 2 in series so they run slow and quiet-but you must move enough air to cool the computer.
In the box I built I also found that air flow geometry is a big factor: ie place the fans/ducts so the exit is where the most hot air is (back of computer where its fans exhale) and place the intake so the new air flows towards the intake parts of the computer. I found that by doing this and also disallowing airflow to useless areas in the box I got a lower temp inside. I use a radio shack indoor/outdoor thermomoter, putting the "outdoor" sensor at the hottest place inside the box. Cost about $30. Put it where you can check it daily or more.
As an aside, in my place, I vented the box out with flexduct so that the fan ( a good sized centrifugal one) is actually in another room, so I get a huge airflow and no noise at all in my recording area. I record and mix in one big room so this was a must, but mixing in a really quiet room is really a pleasure and reduces fatigue.
SK1
#14
11th September 2006
Old 11th September 2006
  #14
SK1
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The BIG question, whether you put the computer in a closet, commercial iso box or home made iso box is .....

What temperature range is safe for our computers ?????

Also, have you noticed that is some commercial iso boxes there's an alarm that rings when the temp gets to high ????
That would be nice to have. In the closet or in a home made iso box.

But what temp is the alarm set to ??? What's too high ???

BOOM !!!!
( that's the sound of my cpu exploding )
BobSchwenkler
Thread Starter
#15
11th September 2006
Old 11th September 2006
  #15
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Thread Starter
Most computers have a specified operating temperature range. The information must be available somewhere not too inaccessible (like the manual... just need to find it).

Are most computer fans run on 12VDC?
BobSchwenkler
Thread Starter
#16
11th September 2006
Old 11th September 2006
  #16
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Thread Starter
Do you have any good leads on 120V fans that are quiet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by JGP View Post
You can certainly get 120v fans. I've sometimes wired 2 in series so they run slow and quiet-but you must move enough air to cool the computer.
In the box I built I also found that air flow geometry is a big factor: ie place the fans/ducts so the exit is where the most hot air is (back of computer where its fans exhale) and place the intake so the new air flows towards the intake parts of the computer. I found that by doing this and also disallowing airflow to useless areas in the box I got a lower temp inside. I use a radio shack indoor/outdoor thermomoter, putting the "outdoor" sensor at the hottest place inside the box. Cost about $30. Put it where you can check it daily or more.
As an aside, in my place, I vented the box out with flexduct so that the fan ( a good sized centrifugal one) is actually in another room, so I get a huge airflow and no noise at all in my recording area. I record and mix in one big room so this was a must, but mixing in a really quiet room is really a pleasure and reduces fatigue.
#17
11th September 2006
Old 11th September 2006
  #17
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#18
12th September 2006
Old 12th September 2006
  #18
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I built a box, with glass door, open bottom with filter and small openinig on rear /top. a cheap fan from kmart is 120v 6 " pretty quiet on low......
#19
12th September 2006
Old 12th September 2006
  #19
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Well, I have a P4 2,6 HT with two drives ,which makes a pretty loud and hot combination. so I took out the original Intel fan from the CPU, istalled a Ninja Scythe heatsink thingy on silver thermal "wax". Then switched the graphics card to fanless, Matrox p650, put some thick isolation foam all over the case, and installed three biggest Glacialtech fans (12 cm diameter) that move the air from the drives and the Scythe to the back of the case and out. Combine this with a Be Quiet power supply and You have a nearly dead silent computer. If You use a SE Reflection Filter while recording vocals You can get ultra clean vocal tracks.

Howgh!

Marty
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