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elektricshock
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#1
7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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What do you charge?

Hey guys-- I know there's been a bunch of threads like this, but the answer always seems to be along the lines of "it varies wildly, so there's no point in answering".

Fair enough, but I think it would be helpful for amateurs crossing into the professional world to have some perspective and a general ballpark idea of what is reasonable, so if wouldn't mind sharing, post here.

Also include details (for perspective)... what you do, how you charge (hourly/daily/by project), your size and reputation (just starting out, local, regional, national), location, and the type of studio you work out of.

I think this'll be helpful to a lot of people, myself included.
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7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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+1 on this request. However I'd like to tailor my version of the request to have it be hypothetical and centered around new entrants into the professional industry.

In my case I'm initially trying to diversify rather than specialize at the get-go, to see where there's the most room in the market in my city for my services and where I might catch a break via networking etc.

So as my studio is nearing completion and I'm already starting to pick up contracts, I'm finding myself offering quite possibly "too good of a deal" because I don't see how it's possible to get contracts with few prior examples of my work, no finished studio website, etc.

For example one contract will involve writing, recording, mixing and mastering a complete song set to a vocalist's pre-written lyrics, as a test before they will sign on for more songs.

It's all being done for a few hundred dollars which will likely work out to be much less than I am used to working for per hour, especially as I will be bringing in a drummer and guitarist to do session recording.

But is this not how new studios "have" to start? Any insight/experiences much appreciated.
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7th December 2012
Old 7th December 2012
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I've always maintained that it is very important not to charge too low, because the pay you ask for is representative of where in society you see our skills ranking.

In the UK, in terms of self-employed (which assumably what you're asking, since you're asking 'how much do you charge - and when you have a salary you don't choose what you 'charge' your employer) I think you can generally split income into 3 sectors - unskilled labour, professionals, and management. Below rates are based on self employed, not salaries.

In the UK, the 'unskilled' workforce are paid between about £7 and £10 per hour. When I say 'unskilled', I don't mean that they don't have any skills. It just means, they aren't going into their job representing themselves as a professional in a skill. A checkout operator may be very skilled at quickly operating the checkout, servicing the conveyor belt and dealing with difficult customers, but they still come under the 'unskilled labour' banner, probably because skill in that region is not a pre-requisite when starting.

Then you have the 'professional' band, these are people who go into the jobs already possessing a skill, and go to work to perform that skill. Many if not most will hold some kind of qualification or chartered status in that skill, although obviously some industries - ours in particular - do not yet have a formal qualification scheme yet. This area typically earns between £10 and £30 an hour depending on the level of qualification and the amount of responsibility held in the position.

And then you have the management level, which is generally £20+ per hour. These people will have mastered the trade as a professional and are now employed to lead others and be responsible at project level rather than just for their own assigned tasks.

--------

The problem which I raise with a lot of new sound engineers etc is that they are happy to go out for like, £50-75 a day. Which, may seem better than going out as a Tesco shelf-stacker for £50-75 a day. However, what you are doing - if performing the role as a sound engineer - is basically giving people the message that sound engineers fit in the £7-10 bracket and are thus "unskilled labour". Are they? Of course they aren't. Of course, generally the quality of sound engineer going out at £50-75 is not the same as the proper freelancers going out at £250/day, but the problem is that people do start to get ideas about what sound engineers cost, and thus clients start to see sound engineers as being relatively low-skilled people. And this is where the trade falls down.

Once people think that sound engineers fit in the unskilled bracket, they will lose respect for what we do and they will not treat us as professionals. You go out at £250/day and to the client you are definitely well within the professional bracket and you will be treated as such.

So whilst you do have a business responsibility to yourself to go out at a rate that is in line with your own experience and your own abilities, you also have a responsibility to the wider sound engineering community to go out at a rate in which people know that you are, and will treat you as, a professional in a trade. Sound Engineers are trade professionals in the same way as electricians or plumbers are trade professionals.

If you do not see your abilities as such where you could go out as a self employed sound engineer and commandeer a rate of £150+ per day, maybe you are not ready to consider yourself a freelancer yet, and you need to find your place to learn the job before you begin charging as a full trade professional. I don't think my posts will change the fact that sound engineers will continue to go out for single figure hourly rates but hopefully I might make somebody at least think about the wider effect that it is having and tempt them away from winning business by undercutting the rest rather than being good at their job; because in the long term that strategy will come back to bite you in the ass.
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#4
8th December 2012
Old 8th December 2012
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That was a great reply, the problem in my case lays in the fact that I spent years apprenticing but did not build up a portfolio as I should have.

Now I'm wondering if I can charge a full rate (I can easily check what others are charging in my area for equivalent services, after all), without an existing portfolio to back up the quality I know I can deliver.

Has anyon landed themselves in such a situation? Did you have to charge less until you could reference a host of snippets of/references to previous work?

I imagine I'd have to do at least 10 contracts before I'd have a substantial enough portfolio.

The good news is that I'm still studying while trying to get the business off the ground on the side. I'll have at least two more years leeway before I want to be able to charge pro rates.

Are you saying I should try to charge pro rates from the get-go?

Thanks.
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8th December 2012
Old 8th December 2012
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Best advice I can give is this:

Always start negotiating at full rate. Say for _____, _______, and ______ it is $___. Give it to them as a quote.

Follow up soon after. If they say they don't have the money but want to negotiate, start making cuts.

If the quote is in a totally different ballpark than their budget and you want to work on it, do it for free. They'll remember that when they do have a budget for a project. Also, it doesn't lower your known set price for your services.

So far it's worked quite well.
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8th December 2012
Old 8th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcoul058 View Post
That was a great reply, the problem in my case lays in the fact that I spent years apprenticing but did not build up a portfolio as I should have.

Now I'm wondering if I can charge a full rate (I can easily check what others are charging in my area for equivalent services, after all), without an existing portfolio to back up the quality I know I can deliver.

Has anyon landed themselves in such a situation? Did you have to charge less until you could reference a host of snippets of/references to previous work?

I imagine I'd have to do at least 10 contracts before I'd have a substantial enough portfolio.

The good news is that I'm still studying while trying to get the business off the ground on the side. I'll have at least two more years leeway before I want to be able to charge pro rates.

Are you saying I should try to charge pro rates from the get-go?

Thanks.
Yes I am saying you should charge pro rates from the get go, because in the long term you will not be doing yourself any favours if you start freelancing as anything less than a pro, and if you are a pro, you deserve to be paid pro rates.

If you charge anything less than 'pro rates' you devalue the trade and the amount of money which people are prepared to pay sound engineers will drop.

If you are not ready to work as a pro yet you need to continue to work as an apprentice until you are ready. Offering sub-standard services for a reduced rate will probably work in the short term getting you off your backside and into work but it will not work out well in the long term.

Working for free is bad for you too. Getting a proper trainee position until such a time as you are ready to go independent is the way forward. I appreciate it is hard to find trainee positions, they are like gold dust, but maybe this is a good time to realise that there really aren't many jobs in the world of sound engineering - frequent paying jobs for sound engineers are like gold dust too.
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17th December 2012
Old 17th December 2012
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Charge what you are worth.

And be able to back it up.
#8
17th December 2012
Old 17th December 2012
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Thanks for all the advice everyone,

I listened to the greater consensus and it paid off. I have apprenticed for long enough, over 10 years since I first studied Audio Engineering in a 1-year program in a local recording studio's vocational school.

I won't make a list of all the work I've done but I felt it was enough to earn some amount of respect of potential clients. It's just that my work was so all over the place I never built up a portfolio of recordings that established myself in any one style (aside from classical, but that's not a service I can exactly offer at my studio).

Long story short, drove a hard but fair bargain, and the contract went through. I noticed that the initial email detailing the amount of work that would actually be undertaken for the price wasn't the seller.

It was the follow-up email that stated that I would be willing to make minor adjustments after the fact until the client was totally satisfied that sealed the deal. I can start to see now the kind of charisma that has to go into getting a foot in this market.

Again, thanks for all the advice so far. Hopefully the OP gained something from this too.
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17th December 2012
Old 17th December 2012
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Recording--$ 85.00 per hour-- 4 hour minimum or $ 600.00 for an 8 hour block
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17th December 2012
Old 17th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by analogexplosions View Post

If the quote is in a totally different ballpark than their budget and you want to work on it, do it for free.

Quote:
They'll remember that when they do have a budget for a project.

yeah, they will remember you as the "free guy" - and now that they have some money, they will think they should go with someone, you know, a little more "professional". It never fails.

Quote:
Also, it doesn't lower your known set price for your services.
Yes it does. Your known set price for your services is now "known" to be Zero.

I am sorry, but I consider this terrible advice. At "free", there is no incentive for the client to work hard, be prepared, make good use of their time with you, etc.


Plus you are seen as an amateur. Nobody expects "free"! People will ultimately be just as appreciative of a nice discount, and they will respect you more.
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#11
17th December 2012
Old 17th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcoul058 View Post
But is this not how new studios "have" to start? Any insight/experiences much appreciated.
No, no, please no. This is NOT how you HAVE to start out. It may seem like an impossible task to make your mark, and maybe it is, but if you give yourself away, you will cut your value to nothing in the eyes of your client. You will only be "the guy who works for free cause he's got nothing going on...."

A MUCH better approach would be : "Well, my one song rate is $1000. You pay it up front, and I will produce the song for you. You like the song, you contract me to do 9 more @ that price, and I will give you a 20% discount. You don't like the song, fine. I will give you back $800 and I KEEP THE RECORDING, you get no mp3's, no finished mix, nothing. They will only stiff you if they REALLY hate what you did, and if they DO hate what you did, working with them even for money is a waste of time anyway.

If you approach it in a creative way like the above, you are in the drivers seat, not the freeloading "potential" client. You young guys have to figure this out quick. If you don't, there will be no industry left for you to make ANY money in.

Best of luck to ANY and ALL starting out. It was rough 30 years ago. It's way worse now. And today's middle school and HS students with recording studio's at their middle & High Schools graduate from Full Sail, it's going to be exponentially harder than it is now.
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#12
18th December 2012
Old 18th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
yeah, they will remember you as the "free guy" - and now that they have some money, they will think they should go with someone, you know, a little more "professional". It never fails.
This is the right advice. If you work for free you will always be the free guy. If you work for cheap you wil always be the cheap guy. If you work for a lot you will always be the expensive guy. And when they can afford an expensive guy, they will go to the expensive guy. They will not go to the free guy and say 'Hey, you normally work for free but we're going to be nice and pay you this time". Nobody does that.

One of my first gigs was mixing for a guy in London who worked for a pretty influential and well connected company. He got me quite a lot of work, mixing both his own band, and bands his company dealt with. To get the first gig I charged £15/song to mix and £5 a song to master. I put my heart and soul into them and worked as hard as I could. I also bought equipment.

Now I look back and realise I wasn't getting the gigs because he liked my work, I was getting the gigs because he liked not having to pay proper money. After about 10 mixes that were successfully released, I started to realise what sort of money was available (meeting the graphics designer, attending the launch party etc). I said I wanted £100 a mix. I've not heard from him since.

£100 a mix is cheap but point being he had somebody earmarked for that bracket. I was a useful tool for him when I was cheap but once I wasn't cheap anymore, the only thing I had to offer was gone and that was that.

Also, quickly

Quote:
Originally Posted by kcoul058 View Post
But is this not how new studios "have" to start? Any insight/experiences much appreciated.
No not at all. I mean, if you start a studio and then look for clients next, then maybe. But you are already a proven idiot. In the current climate of things, you should only be opening a studio once using other peoples' is no longer economical for you. There are enough studios about that any engineer with half a brain will just work out of somebody else's studio until such a time when they have a long enough queue of work waiting that they can make more money out of their own facility.
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18th December 2012
Old 18th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elektricshock View Post
Hey guys-- I know there's been a bunch of threads like this, but the answer always seems to be along the lines of "it varies wildly, so there's no point in answering".

Fair enough, but I think it would be helpful for amateurs crossing into the professional world to have some perspective and a general ballpark idea of what is reasonable, so if wouldn't mind sharing, post here.

Also include details (for perspective)... what you do, how you charge (hourly/daily/by project), your size and reputation (just starting out, local, regional, national), location, and the type of studio you work out of.

I think this'll be helpful to a lot of people, myself included.
Someone mentioned that its important not to charge too low. I`ll add that its important not to charge beyond your capabilities. You have to know your limits. I don`t own a large space, one room actually. Most of what I do is track by track. If I`m recording a band, I have to book another room which I charge as an additional fee because bands/artists have their own preferences sometimes. The stuff I can do alone in my studio is charged according to what I know others are doing in similar settings.

Song Production for Singer-Songwriters: $1800-2500/song (+ studio fee if needed)
I write the charts, hire the players, mix and usually record or work out bkg vocals. I track the lead singer and guide them. Mix and master tune. (Arranging is an additional fee)

Tracking/Mixing/Vocals: $75/hour
This varies from project to project. Sometime its a lead vocal or bkg vocals, sometimes both. Its easier to charge per hour because it can range from 4 hours to 12. I`m often asked to mix the vocals with the rest of the track so I just add that into the fee.

Mastering: $125/song for the first 8
$75 for each additional tune.

All files are delivered upon final payment.
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#14
18th December 2012
Old 18th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Buckley View Post
Someone mentioned that its important not to charge too low. I`ll add that its important not to charge beyond your capabilities. You have to know your limits. I don`t own a large space, one room actually. Most of what I do is track by track. If I`m recording a band, I have to book another room which I charge as an additional fee because bands/artists have their own preferences sometimes. The stuff I can do alone in my studio is charged according to what I know others are doing in similar settings.
To be honest I would say for most engineers / producers I have met, the limiting factor is often / usually ability, not facility.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Before offering your services out at a price you need to be sure you're good enough to provide the service that you're offering. Fair to say when I first started I was nowhere near enough to perform the services I was offering. I made a tit of myself getting out of my depth and it all went wrong. I was lucky to find refuge in a studio where I could drop under the radar for a bit, and it was there I learnt the job which I thought I already knew.

I know for a fact there are a lot of people out there offering the service, just like I did, who really need that education. Not a couple of years of audio school, a proper education in a professional environment with somebody who already does the job for a living.

If you charge somebody $20/hour for a job you don't know how to do properly you will find yourself very unpopular very fast. You never know what you don't know, so if you haven't had several years solid experience (yes I don't mean in the studio for 2 or 3 days, two or 3 times a year, I don't mean university studios, and I don't mean running the session unsupervised) in a studio I would assume reasonably safely that you aren't as good as you think you are and should re-consider your options moving forward.
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19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tc_live View Post
To be honest I would say for most engineers / producers I have met, the limiting factor is often / usually ability, not facility.
Yes, I agree. I could have been more specific but thats what I was referring to when I said you need to know your limits. I`ve had clients ask me to overlook projects for them even though they already had an engineer and studio. Its just another something I`ll do. I guess some would call that producing in the "old sense" so yes, its not about the facility, its about the talents you bring to a project.
#16
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Buckley View Post
Yes, I agree. I could have been more specific but thats what I was referring to when I said you need to know your limits. I`ve had clients ask me to overlook projects for them even though they already had an engineer and studio. Its just another something I`ll do. I guess some would call that producing in the "old sense" so yes, its not about the facility, its about the talents you bring to a project.
I would agree. In recent times when 'producing' bands I have come to the opinion that the majority of engineers who advertise themselves as 'engineer/producers' are just engineers trying to make themselves more employable by changing the title. We had a guy the other week who insisted to the band that he could produce them to keep the cost down. I went anyway and it turns out he couldn't read sheet music. How do you produce a band with a 4-piece string section when you can't read score?
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19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Case View Post
Many rock producers can't read. Nor can the bands they record. All depends what type of music you are dealing with. If he claims to be an expert at producing symphonic music then yes he needs to read, but otherwise maybe not.
Frank_Case,

tc_live did say it was a 4 piece string section so I would imagine reading skills would come in to play. Most of the time you don`t need to read music but I find my music theory and conservatory training come in very handy at just about every session, even with a rock band. It also helps to have a deep understanding of songwriting. All of these skills are incorporated into what you bring to a project.

If I charged for each of them, I`d be charging brain surgeon fees.
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19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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I've been doing only my own stuff and a few friends in my studio for many years. Now I'm thinking about getting clients. Problem is, I work slowly and methodically and have some quirky ways of doing things. Also don't use software: all analog, console, 4 track tape, and an Alesis HD24XR. Given these limitations, I'm thinking rates as low as $15 an hour would be justified. Am I wrong?
#19
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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This has GOT to be the MOST emotionally charged issue on this forum.

[I'm talking here like we recording engineer/studio owners are similiar, so I'm using "we". I know that's not accurate.]

Unless we're on top of the food chain (what 50 people in the world?) we're constantly HOPING we're any good at what we do, then we get a little positive feedback from our clients (who usually don't have great and discerning ears) and we consider raising our rates, buying better equipment.

But we're constantly assessing our work against the great works and cringe because (even with mastering) ours doesn't sound that good. We spend years approaching asymptotically the "sound" we want to produce and are still never quite sure of our talents.

It keeps me humble but also feeling a bit underhanded, which I hate, like I'm this constant pretender who's taking work and money from the people who have put much more time in. Yet my talent is growing and my list of clients now and in the future is benefiting.

I'm sure the OP meant to just get some idea of rates around the world, and most of us are doing long-winded justifications.

$20/hour is the short answer. Me + the studio. Remote West Texas, so not much competition. Hybrid analog/digital, separate adobe structure, all equipment was about $40K, building was about $60K; will break even never.
Been doing this for about 30 years off and on, was never my only income. Maybe 80 projects produced/engineered down through the years. 60 yrs. old.

but I effin' LOVE the work and am PROUD to be in the same lineage as all of you, young and old, experienced or not.
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19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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I charge $75/ hour for the studio and myself as an engineer. The price drops to $70 assuming we do more than 3 hours. But, I'm a producer/musician who can supply the tracks and for that I charge ala carte as a musician. Generally it's an extra $160/ song for me to supply guitar, bass, keys, drums, misc. wind instruments, harmonica, mandolin, etc. I also will throw things in and will use that fee to work with the budget. Here in LA most of the studio musicians I hire are getting at least $100/hour or per song so use that in my pitch. Also, the studio itself is a very nice four room facility with good gear including PT, Logic, Reaper and Digital Performer. Finally, I've been doing it for over 20 years. I will say that it's been rough the past 2 years and I'm lucky I can stay afloat. My prices haven't changed in at least 6 years and instead of lowering my rates I've chosen to try to improve my studio and, more importantly, myself. That means that I've focused more on delivering a better product and "sticking to my guns." Generally that's paid off as the people I attract want quality results and budget is less of a factor. The hardest thing for one to sell is themselves but in reality, that's what you're trying to do as you are your biggest asset.

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#21
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Case View Post

Hiring an engineer is like hiring a lawyer. You hire a $300/hr lawyer because you know he will get five times the work done per hour compared to the lawyer charging $100.
you hire the $300/hr lawyer because you know you're guilty!
#22
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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As much as you can until you reach a price bracket where you can sometimes offer lower rates doing projects closer to your heart and still make a comfortable living...

Noone can answer the ”How much” for you...You have to be a salesman as well as an engineer.

Sometimes you charge more, simply because your client has a bigger budget, sometimes you charge less, simply because you would love working on a project or think it would benefit your career.

And thats probably the reason why some people don’t share their rates. Everyone knows rates differ, and putting it in writing is setting it in stone.
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#23
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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This sounds about right. To this:

"Sometimes you charge more, simply because your client has a bigger budget,"

I would add the corollary: and that bigger budget often means the stakes are higher in terms of quality, detail, meeting deadlines, and customer relations. Charge accordingly.

But also: make sure you know exactly what's expected (and the client knows what you understand to be the job, and what *your* requirements are) before setting a price. I have made the mistake of assuming a project was bigger (i.e. would take more work) than it actually was and have set too high a price as a result--only learning later that I missed out on good $ for a relatively easy job. Ask questions when approached: What, how, when, etc.!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Labs View Post
As much as you can until you reach a price bracket where you can sometimes offer lower rates doing projects closer to your heart and still make a comfortable living...

Noone can answer the ”How much” for you...You have to be a salesman as well as an engineer.

Sometimes you charge more, simply because your client has a bigger budget, sometimes you charge less, simply because you would love working on a project or think it would benefit your career.

And thats probably the reason why some people don’t share their rates. Everyone knows rates differ, and putting it in writing is setting it in stone.
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#24
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank_Case View Post
Well OK, that's one strategy.

A better strategy if you are good is "I always charge more because I only deal with clients that have enough budget to afford the quality I offer"

Big difference. A higher rate can be used to screen out clients you really don't want to deal with anyways.
Please note that the quote you attributed to me was actually me quoting Labs...and true--point taken.
#25
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
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Originally Posted by joeq View Post
you hire the $300/hr lawyer because you know you're guilty!
Not necessarily.
#26
19th December 2012
Old 19th December 2012
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by code green View Post
Please note that the quote you attributed to me was actually me quoting Labs...and true--point taken.
Duly noted and corrected.
#27
22nd December 2012
Old 22nd December 2012
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My initial conversation with a client whether by phone or email always goes like this:

Me: "Hello"

Client: "Hi"

small talk da di da di da

Me: "So tell me a bit about the musical arrangement of your material"

Client: "8 songs, 4 band members, vocals, acoustic, drums" etc

Me: "Are you looking to cut live multitrack or overdub?" explaining pro's and cons of both sonics & time scale for each method. Usually it's overdubbing (unfortunately)

Me: "So what's your budget for this project?"

Client: £X

Me: "Ok, I'll draw up a quote and get it over to you asap"

A non professional client by nature will always give you a low budget, probably lower than what they are prepared to pay, but, with a figure to work to you can quote to their original requirements, even if it goes over their budget. Throw in some sweetners like a mixing discount, discount from next session etc.

You can also take the figure he/she has given you and let them know what you can do for exactly that cost.

I always quote on a per job basis. I charge a 10 piece band more than a 4 piece band.. It's more taxing in both tracking and mixing and 10 people can raise much more cash than 4. If I go out on location to do some corporate work, I will be charging significantly more that I would for music. 1. cuz I hate it!. 2. Cuz I know a large corporation will have a MUCH higher budget than a 4 piece semi professional band. The corporate work will be much quicker and less intensive as well. B&B.

If I knew a very good solo musician who was broke I would have no qualms in recording them very cheap if I thought or knew their material was going to raise my profile. Or if i just liked it.
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#28
22nd December 2012
Old 22nd December 2012
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
you hire the $300/hr lawyer because you know you're guilty!
And I imagine that you hire the $100/hr engineer because you know you CANT MIX!!
#29
22nd December 2012
Old 22nd December 2012
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
you hire the $300/hr lawyer because you know you're guilty!
Quote:
Originally Posted by octanemedia View Post
And I imagine that you hire the $100/hr engineer because you know you CANT MIX!!
And these quotes just prove that, as untrue as it is, people still attach quality to prices. People, by and large, believe that more expensive products are of higher quality than cheaper products.

And so, whilst at first you may think that being cheap stops you pricing yourself out of work, you are wrong. You may not be pricing yourself out of low-budget work, but you are pricing yourself out of higher budget work. People who do have the cash to spend, and like some of what they've heard of you, will think "well if he only charges £x, and all the other proper mix engineers are charging £y, there's obviously a reason". They will.

I mean if you want something that's really good, do you buy the cheap one that's supposed to be pretty good, and wait to find out why it's cheap; or do you buy the one that's expensive and supposed to be good?

What you are also not seeing is the bigger picture of what it does to the industry as a whole. Lawyers all charge a lot. So you accept that when you want legal representation it costs you. But then if a huge proportion of lawyers (probably, more than not) all dropped their rates to like, $10 an hour, what would that do to lawyers rates in general? There would be a few who were the proper pro lawyers who will always represent celebrities and billionaires, but there will also be a huge bunch of lawyers who've worked hard their whole lives and now have to drop their rates to remain remotely competitive.

If you work for cheap, this is what you are doing to our industry.
#30
22nd December 2012
Old 22nd December 2012
  #30
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$60/hr. or $400 for a 10-hour block of time. It's not worth turning the power on for any less. If it's a project that I really like, I will work to accommodate the band's budget.

Cheers,
--
Don
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