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TASCAM TM-D8000 Mixer?
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Matt Hepworth
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#1
16th April 2006
Old 16th April 2006
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TASCAM TM-D8000 Mixer?

So, these are old boys. Are they 24 Bit? Has anyone had any success using them as a DAW controller?


Thanks!
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19th April 2006
Old 19th April 2006
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Bump!
#3
19th April 2006
Old 19th April 2006
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They're 16bit. They probably send some midi signals for DAW control (I would guess pan/mute/fader/eq). You have to program this in your sequencer package and most of the time it's a pain in the ass to use (i have a Tascam digtal mixer). You can't compare this with modern controllers, you'd better buy a Behringer BCF2000 instead!
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#4
19th April 2006
Old 19th April 2006
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16 bit - bummer!

Thanks.
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19th April 2006
Old 19th April 2006
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The converters are probably 18 bit with dynamics of 104 dB.
On the mix bus the 8000 works with 24 bit fixed point. As long as you don´t cause an Over in the mix bus it sounds fine. No further headroom - if you have over sin the mix out you must lower the channel faders.

The idea with 20 PODS for editing a channel without switching through levels was great and the next desk that had it was the Sony DMX-R100.

The TM-D8000 with 32 bit floating processing and motorfaders would have been a great desk. But Tascam didn´t see the market and decided to make toys like the TM-D4000 and DM-24.
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20th April 2006
Old 20th April 2006
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Believe it or not. I still use one for mixing! Can't stand any of these new cheapo digital consoles or controllers.
It has 18 Bit converters (which I just use for efffect returns) and 24 bit internal.
It's still a great console ergonomically and my mixes work well. I have been lookin for something to replace it, but I still have not found anything. The only thing would be the Sony, which is also discontinued.
The DM2000 might be a way to go!

But believe me, this is still a great console for mixing!
#7
20th April 2006
Old 20th April 2006
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I always hated those boards....
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21st April 2006
Old 21st April 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSweetener
Believe it or not. I still use one for mixing! Can't stand any of these new cheapo digital consoles or controllers.
It has 18 Bit converters (which I just use for efffect returns) and 24 bit internal.
It's still a great console ergonomically and my mixes work well. I have been lookin for something to replace it, but I still have not found anything. The only thing would be the Sony, which is also discontinued.
The DM2000 might be a way to go!

But believe me, this is still a great console for mixing!
Cool - thanks for the post!
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21st April 2006
Old 21st April 2006
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Like someone said before, if you want an impressive looking digital console for small $$ this might be the way to go.

If you don't use the pres, converters and dynamics and don't drive the mixbus too hard, it's a pleasure to work on it. 48 hi quality faders ans 20 knobs for the whole channel strip. Many biult in in/outs and a cool meterbridge.
The main reason for finding somthing new, is that it's simply to big for me. I don't wanna turn my head to the TFTs all the time.
Another drawback might be that it's old and not supported anymore. I have used mine since 1999 EVERY DAY without ANY problems!


Oh, I almost forgot to say. I have always used TDIF (cause I work with Soundscape stuff). If you wanna use ADAT or more than 8 channels AES, it's going to be complicated!
#10
21st April 2006
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Ah, please forget using it as a DAW controller.
Tried it, does not work!
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22nd April 2006
Old 22nd April 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSweetener
Like someone said before, if you want an impressive looking digital console for small $$ this might be the way to go.

If you don't use the pres, converters and dynamics and don't drive the mixbus too hard, it's a pleasure to work on it. 48 hi quality faders ans 20 knobs for the whole channel strip. Many biult in in/outs and a cool meterbridge.
The main reason for finding somthing new, is that it's simply to big for me. I don't wanna turn my head to the TFTs all the time.
Another drawback might be that it's old and not supported anymore. I have used mine since 1999 EVERY DAY without ANY problems!


Oh, I almost forgot to say. I have always used TDIF (cause I work with Soundscape stuff). If you wanna use ADAT or more than 8 channels AES, it's going to be complicated!
Are you using the Soundscape S88's?
#12
22nd April 2006
Old 22nd April 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glitch
Are you using the Soundscape S88's?
S88? Don't know what you mean


I use a Mixpander Power Pack PCI card. I's 24 TDIF I/O from and to the TM-D8000 and works flawlessly!
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#13
26th April 2006
Old 26th April 2006
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Oops, I meant SS8 I/O.
#14
5th May 2010
Old 5th May 2010
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I have to disagree.

I owned & used a Tascam TM-D8000 for nearly 11 years, and hands down, these were just incredible consoles.

It gave you TONS of flexibility, and you could just about route 'anything' to 'anywhere' you'd like or could think of. The overall design & concept was really amazing, and quite ahead of it's time when it first came out. True, it would have been really nice to have had the automated faders, I agree - but you could at least still do automated recall & snapshots, and as long as you thought things through, you could really pull-off some incredible mixes with this board.

(plus it was built like a russian tank, beyond 'huge', and looked like it came out of one of NASA's bathrooms

Also, the built-in EQ's & dynamics were extremely useful & sounded really good - and I personally loved using the mic-pres on it all the time. They sounded great. Very 'transparent', (similar to Grace pres) but then again - if you use a lot of outboard mic-pres (especially the really 'thick-tube' sounding pres) or say, ribbon mics even - those really clean & transparent mic-pres on the TM-D8000 would simply allow for things such as those to be heard 'uncolored', and as they were meant to be heard.

However, I will agree that if you're looking for an updated DAW controller - you'd be better off looking for something else more suited for that (which the TM-D8000 was not obviously) - but if you're looking for one hell of a 'versatile' mixing console, and can't afford to spend $40,000 on one - then the TM-D8000 is probably going to be one of your best bets, seriously.

(also, this hardly ever gets mentioned anymore - but the TM-D8000 works absolute wonders in an all-analog set-up, such as running it with a multi-track, 1 or 2-inch analog reel-to-reel set-up. That console has TONS of in's & out's, and really nice EQ & compression on each channel - so it actually works out really nicely when run in conjunction with any type of analog (not just all digital set-ups, like a stack of DA-88's for example) Again, one good thing about having a really 'clean', solid & transparent sounding mixer like that, is that it allows you to hear all of the true, more vintage 'colored' and 'analog' signals & sounds, 'exactly' like they were suppose to be heard. Sometimes, (especially nowadays) we have the tendency to run 'everything' through as many tube-based products as possible, over & over & over - and before you know it, you can't even hear what that classic RCA ribbon mic was 'really' suppose to sound like to begin with


- anyways - hope that can help shed at least a 'little' light on your Tascam inquiry? I'd only say to buy one if you really want or need to do 'real mixing' and not as a DAW controller (however, you might want to look into one of those Tascam US-2400 DAW controllers - they're no longer in production of course, but for the money (on Ebay) - it's one of the VERY FEW controllers out there (under a billion dollars) that actually gives you the full 24-faders, all the way across,(so you don't have to spend the money & buy 3 units in order to daisy-chain them) plus you get a collection of rotary dials, knobs, joystick, etc.

(and it's fully automated with 24 motorized faders - so that might be worth looking into?)
#15
5th May 2010
Old 5th May 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morris1988 View Post
I have to disagree.

I owned & used a Tascam TM-D8000 for nearly 11 years, and hands down, these were just incredible consoles.

It gave you TONS of flexibility, and you could just about route 'anything' to 'anywhere' you'd like or could think of. The overall design & concept was really amazing, and quite ahead of it's time when it first came out. True, it would have been really nice to have had the automated faders, I agree - but you could at least still do automated recall & snapshots, and as long as you thought things through, you could really pull-off some incredible mixes with this board.

(plus it was built like a russian tank, beyond 'huge', and looked like it came out of one of NASA's bathrooms

Also, the built-in EQ's & dynamics were extremely useful & sounded really good - and I personally loved using the mic-pres on it all the time. They sounded great. Very 'transparent', (similar to Grace pres) but then again - if you use a lot of outboard mic-pres (especially the really 'thick-tube' sounding pres) or say, ribbon mics even - those really clean & transparent mic-pres on the TM-D8000 would simply allow for things such as those to be heard 'uncolored', and as they were meant to be heard.

However, I will agree that if you're looking for an updated DAW controller - you'd be better off looking for something else more suited for that (which the TM-D8000 was not obviously) - but if you're looking for one hell of a 'versatile' mixing console, and can't afford to spend $40,000 on one - then the TM-D8000 is probably going to be one of your best bets, seriously.

(also, this hardly ever gets mentioned anymore - but the TM-D8000 works absolute wonders in an all-analog set-up, such as running it with a multi-track, 1 or 2-inch analog reel-to-reel set-up. That console has TONS of in's & out's, and really nice EQ & compression on each channel - so it actually works out really nicely when run in conjunction with any type of analog (not just all digital set-ups, like a stack of DA-88's for example) Again, one good thing about having a really 'clean', solid & transparent sounding mixer like that, is that it allows you to hear all of the true, more vintage 'colored' and 'analog' signals & sounds, 'exactly' like they were suppose to be heard. Sometimes, (especially nowadays) we have the tendency to run 'everything' through as many tube-based products as possible, over & over & over - and before you know it, you can't even hear what that classic RCA ribbon mic was 'really' suppose to sound like to begin with


- anyways - hope that can help shed at least a 'little' light on your Tascam inquiry? I'd only say to buy one if you really want or need to do 'real mixing' and not as a DAW controller (however, you might want to look into one of those Tascam US-2400 DAW controllers - they're no longer in production of course, but for the money (on Ebay) - it's one of the VERY FEW controllers out there (under a billion dollars) that actually gives you the full 24-faders, all the way across,(so you don't have to spend the money & buy 3 units in order to daisy-chain them) plus you get a collection of rotary dials, knobs, joystick, etc.

(and it's fully automated with 24 motorized faders - so that might be worth looking into?)
I could not agree more! After having made the switch to mixing in Cubase/Soundscape completely, I realized how good the 8000 actually sounded. I just had to get rid of it's big profile, ergonomically it's so much nicer with my TFTs in front of me and just two MCs inbetween.
The built in dynamics kind of suck, the rest (EQs, pres) did a great job!

Anyway thumbsup long live the TM-D8000!
#16
5th May 2010
Old 5th May 2010
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I had one of these for a little while, They aren't too shabby. As said tons of routing available, I think there are better sounding digital consoles around today but they come at a price. Yes they are 18 bit converters and 24 bit internally (don't know why but I have a feeling it may have even been 32 bit floating but don't count on it, 24 bit sounds about right probably to early for 32 bit floating). I remember them sounding a little thin and possibly slightly grainy but it's been a while. The automation needs an old mac to run ( I'm pretty sure you can use up to an early G4 with a card to run it I think it needs a mini din connecter to run it), no moving faders but worked effectively enough.
I think I may even still have the card I'm talking about for a g4, Can't remember though the G4 is long gone now. I'm sure you'd be able to find out some more info on the net though.

Good luck.
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5th May 2010
Old 5th May 2010
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I had one in the B room quite a while ago. As usual Tascam stopped supporting WAY too early, so ended up going to their next desk, I think it was a DM25.

The DM was all the new chit...and was a descent DAW controller. Anyway...I agree with Adebar. The TDM 8000 was great to work on and had a sound. the channel strip set up wad as good as the Sony, and is something every digital console should have.

Depending on your needs...the 8000 had sort of a Neveish raked look and made folks think they were paying for something The DM24 reqardless of its more competitive specs, was half the console to work on or to listen too. I spent a lot of time trying to fidure out if it cound me updated.
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14th February 2011
Old 14th February 2011
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I have one of these that I use as my personal FOH console. I have mixed on some very expensive FOH consoles, both analog and digital, and my TM-D8000 is nothing to sneeze at.

Sure, the 16 analog mic inputs are only 18-Bit, but with a MOTU 2408 and 3 8 Channel Mic Preamps with ADAT outs (24 bit) and you have a very capable 40 channel FOH console.

This thing is incredibly easy to use and navigate, is clean, has excellent Eq capabilities, and I don't mind the compressors, as long as you don't try to make changes on the fly too much (you hear artifacts).

I love the assignable inserts (as well as analog inserts on the 16 analog inputs), and the fact that they didn't go overboard and integrate a few effect processors into it. It has 6 auxes, so you can do shows with 4 monitor mixes from FOH and still have 2 FX auxes. It also has 6 Stereo returns, allthough they have only routing (Fader, no EQ, no aux sends, inserts, etc). It has 4 Mute groups (they call them Cut Groups), and 4 VCA groups (called fader groups).

The TMD-8000 is a great console for FOH if you allready have an existing FOH rack and are looking for a great digital console. It is fairy heavy, but in a case with wheels on it, it's not bad at all. (my case is 48"x32"x16"). I would recomend this console in a heartbeat to any jobbing tech, allthough it isn't something that will be showing up on any riders anytime soon, so I wouldn't recomend it if you supply PA for others to use.

You can pick these up (used, of course) in the sub $2000 range, for that kind of dough, there isn't much that comes close to this full size console. (IMO, of course)
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