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splitting audio into single bands
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Techno Conradi
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#1
5th February 2006
Old 5th February 2006
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splitting audio into single bands

Hi there,

nice people here, very interesting threads...

I have found this bord some hours ago, was looking for a piece of software which is similar to the VB-Audio "C10". This is a multiband compressor, it splits an audio signal into 10 bands, where each band has the width of an octave.
I am interested especially in the splitting feature, not what happens after the splitting (e.g. limiting, compressing, or whatever). But the C10 seems not to be the right tool for me because the width of its bands is fixed, you can not change.

I try to find an application where it is possible to define by myself the width of the several freqency bands. Again, it must not be a multiband compressor, it also just could have a multiple output and I would send the extracted audio from there to "normal" limiters/compressors and from there to a mixer. The main point is to split the audio signal into many bands, but to be flexible with the width of each band.

Does anybody know such an application?
It can be a standalone or a plugin (VST, AU, DirectX, ...), for Mac or also for Windows.
The processing should be done in realtime.

Thanks in advance for your ideas!
Yours,
Techno Conradi
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5th February 2006
Old 5th February 2006
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How about filters?
Techno Conradi
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5th February 2006
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is there a special one you would recommend?
#4
6th February 2006
Old 6th February 2006
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They all have their own qualities, but you could do this with, for example, the EQIII that comes with Pro Tools.

You'll need to figure out what dB/octave is best for you, but say you want to crossover at 100Hz and 1K Hz:

You'll need to set up three output pairs.

Output pair 1: Low freq. Use a Low Pass Filter set to 100Hz

Output pair 2: Mid freq. Use a Hi Pass filter set to 100Hz and a Low Pass filter set to 1K Hz

Output Pair 3: Hi freq. Use a Hi Pass filter set to 1KHz

Most DAW's should already come with the plugin you need to do this. All that's left is to assign each pair of tracks to separate outputs, and voila, you've made an active crossover!

For general purpose, I suggest 24 dB/octave as a starting point.
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